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In recent years there have been considerable changes in the way in which wars are fought by all three Services. However, the fundamental factors of dismounted close combat have not. It is still a chaotic, frightening and bloody experience in which the courage, intelligence and morale of the Infantryman are of paramount importance. Nevertheless, if soldiers are to succeed on the modern battlefield, they require more than courage and high morale. In fact they require significantly enhanced capability procured in a timely and cost effective manner.

The advent of the 21st Century battlefield, coupled with reducing numbers of soldiers, means that an individual soldier has to move, communicate and be supported across a larger area than before. However, the battle will still continue to require the concentration of combat power in order to defeat the enemy with minimum casualties.

Therefore this conference will aim to assess, through operational analysis of recent conflicts where the current soldiering system needs to be improved and what the future requirements are likely to be. Future Soldier 2004 will then deliver key presentations of the soldier modernisation programmes currently in development and ascertain what initiatives are being developed. This conference will cover the key issues of lethality, survivability, C4I and mobility for the individual combat soldier, and will leave you with a comprehensive understanding of the major issues within the field of soldier modernisation.

Benefits of Attending:
· UNDERSTAND the future requirements for the 21st Century combat soldier
· GAIN an insight into the latest soldier modernisation programmes currently in development
· IDENTIFY the main challenges that are driving the soldier programmes of tomorrow
· ANALYSE the key components of soldier modernisation; lethality, mobility, survivability, command and control and sustainability
· DEVELOP your knowledge of the most up to date training techniques for the combat soldier
· MAXIMISE your networking opportunities at this globally attended forum

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· Colonel George P Garrett, Transformation Strategist, Office of Force Transformation, United States Department of Defense
· Colonel Silas W G Suchanek, IPT Leader, Defence Clothing IPT, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer, Deputy Chairman, Topical Group 1, NAAG, NATO
· Lieutenant Colonel Tom Beckett, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, British Army*
· Lieutenant Colonel Philip Carey, Product Manager, Javelin Program, United States Army
· Major Howard Newson, Requirements Manager - FIST, DCC IPT, Defence Procurement Agency
· David Hansen, Project Manager, Marine Expeditionary Rifle Squad, USMC Systems Command
· Ross Guckert, Director, Systems Integration, PEO Soldier, United States Army
· Dr Michael Siebrand, Regierungsdirektor, Programme Manager, Team Leader, BWB
· William Ullern-Manguin, Coherence Architect, Soldier Systems and Interoperability, DGA
· Per Arvidsson, Chief Engineer, Product Manager, Small Arms System, FMV
· Cynthia Blackwell, Human Performance and Training/MANPRINT, Objective Force Warrior Technology Program Office, United States Army
· Dr Neil Shepherd, Principal Operational Analyst, dstl
*Subject to final confirmation

“Outstanding assembly of various countries with similar concepts of infantry tactics, techniques and procedures. I learned a lot.”
Michael Loewe, Division Chief, Infantry, US Army Test and Evaluation

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Chairman to be confirmed

Chairman to be confirmed, ,

9:10 THE 21ST CENTURY NATO SOLDIER

Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer

Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer, Deputy Chairman, Topical Group 1, NAAG, NATO

  • An overview of the way in which NATO’s role is changing and how this effects the modernisation process of the dismounted close combat soldier
  • An analysis of current national soldier modernisation programmes
  • Operational assessments of recent initiatives
  • The co-operation between NATO TG/1 and the industry
  • Future developments for NATO soldier modernisation
  • 9:40 FORCE TRANSFORMATION WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    Colonel George P Garrett

    Colonel George P Garrett, Transformation Strategist, Office of Force Transformation, United States Department of Defense

  • Establishing the ultimate goal of an overwhelming and competitive military advantage and transferring this concept to the individual soldier
  • Analysing the information age implications for the future requirements placed upon the US infantry soldier and what developments need to be put in place
  • The way forward for the transformation of the individual soldier within the DoD
  • Individual combat soldiers within network-centric warfare
  • Where does the future lie for soldier modernisation within the DoD?
  • 10:20 THE MODERNISATION OF THE UNITED STATES INFANTRY

    Lieutenant Colonel Peri A Anest

    Lieutenant Colonel Peri A Anest, 1 OIC, Task Force Soldier Operations, Task Force Soldier, U.S Army

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 A SWEDISH PERSPECTIVE ON FUTURE SOLDIER WEAPONS

    Per Arvidsson

    Per Arvidsson, Chief Engineer, Product Manager, Small Arms System, FMV

  • Developing the technology solutions of the dismounted close combat soldier
  • An analysis of the current systems in use: - Small arms - Grenade launchers - Shoulder fired anti armour weapons - Hand grenades
  • What can be expected in the next 5, 10 and 15 years
  • 12:00 THE TRANSITION OF THE JAVELIN PROGRAM

    Lieutenant Colonel Philip Carey

    Lieutenant Colonel Philip Carey, Product Manager, Javelin Program, United States Army

  • Understanding the problems with the current project and areas that need to be improved upon
  • Establishing what future capabilities will be required through an assessment of current operations
  • An overview of the current Javelin modernisation projects
  • Adapting Javelin to the new drive towards a fully network-centric force
  • The way forward for Javelin, future research, development and testing
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 ADDRESSING THE ISSUE OF LETHALITY

    Alon Guttel

    Alon Guttel, Deputy Vice President for Research and Development, Israel Military Industry

  • What are the future requirements driving current developments in the field of future soldier lethality?
  • How are Israeli Military Industries dealing with the current problems?
  • An analysis of the current research and development programmes
  • The need to co-operate with government organisations to deliver an effective product
  • Future implementation goals and the way forward for future research
  • 14:40 PREPARING THE SOLDIERS OF TOMORROW FOR THE FUTURE CONFLICTS

    Cynthia Blackwell

    Cynthia Blackwell, Human Performance and Training/MANPRINT, Objective Force Warrior Technology Program Office, United States Army

  • Understanding the interaction and the limitations of the man and machine relationship
  • The need to develop the human factors of the future soldier with the same attention to detail as the technology side
  • Ways in which the human element of the future combat soldier can be tested, evaluated and developed
  • The current system
  • Embedded training and the Future Soldier
  • 15:20 TRAINING THE SOLDIERS OF THE FUTURE

    Petter Kellgren

    Petter Kellgren, Manager, Infantry Systems, Saab Training Systems

  • What improvements need to be made to the current training system in use to meet the future requirements
  • Can future training overcome the issues of cost and logistical problems
  • How can live training and simulation complement each other for maximum training result?
  • What benefits will a training system embedded in the new future soldier systems bring?
  • Future training developments
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One, followed by Afternoon Tea

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer

    Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer, Deputy Chairman, Topical Group 1, NAAG, NATO

    9:10 THE UNITED KINGDOM’S FIST PROJECT

  • Overview of the FIST programme’s systems engineering approach
  • Developing the individual infantryman into a weapons platform at the centre of a coherent and complementary weapons and equipment suite
  • Increasing the individual soldier’s fighting and survivability capability
  • Creating an effective systems architecture, integrating the dismounted soldier with the various supporting platforms
  • Recent testing and evaluation results
  • The future for the FIST programme
  • Major Howard Newson

    Major Howard Newson, Requirements Manager - FIST, DCC IPT, Defence Procurement Agency

    Stephan Pattoni

    Stephan Pattoni, Head of Business Development Soldier Systems, Thales Defence

    9:50 ANALYSIS OF THE LAND WARRIOR PROGRAMME

    Speaker to be confirmed

    Speaker to be confirmed, ,

  • Establishing what the future US soldier will require and what impact this will have on future developments
  • Overview of the Land Warrior Programme, main aims and objectives
  • Land Warrior’s place within the Future Combat System
  • The latest results from the operational analysis of Land Warrior
  • Key development areas within the programme
  • Looking to the future, target dates for implementation
  • 10:30 MARINE EXPEDITIONARY RIFLE SQUAD

    David Hansen

    David Hansen, Project Manager, Marine Expeditionary Rifle Squad, USMC Systems Command

  • Why the Squad?
  • What the USMC has done to date
  • Where the USMC is headed
  • Specific work being accomplished
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:30 A EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVE ON SOLDIER MODERNISATION

    Speaker to be confirmed

    Speaker to be confirmed, ,

  • Calculating what the requirements will be for the German soldier in the 21st Century
  • Applying these requirements to development concepts and initiatives
  • An analysis of the current soldier modernisation programme within the German Army
  • Results of operational testing and evaluation
  • Future implementation targets
  • 12:10 A FRENCH PERSPECTIVE ON SOLDIER MODERNISATION

    William Ullern-Manguin

    William Ullern-Manguin, Coherence Architect, Soldier Systems and Interoperability, DGA

  • The needs of the 21st Century French dismounted soldier – an operational approach
  • The DGA organisations that are working towards the future of FELIN – a management approach
  • FELIN version 1 presentation – a technical approach
  • Preparation for the future, the link between FELIN version 1 and FELIN version 2 among the BOA programme
  • The operational contact “bubble” of the infantryman
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:00 ANALYSING THE NEEDS OF THE FUTURE SOLDIER

    Dr Neil Shepherd

    Dr Neil Shepherd, Principal Operational Analyst, dstl

  • Role of operational analysis in the FIST programme (the 4 strands)
  • Analysis tools and techniques for the assessment of the future soldier, across the full spectrum, including urban
  • Requirement for instrumented field experimentation to underpin modelling and simulation
  • Challenges and opportunities presented during field experimentation
  • Requirement trade-off analysis of individual soldier capability
  • Integrating capabilities into flexible future soldier systems
  • 14:40 IMPROVING DISMOUNTED MOBILITY

    Colonel Silas W G Suchanek

    Colonel Silas W G Suchanek, IPT Leader, Defence Clothing IPT, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Current limitations of the present clothing system
  • Reducing the load carried by the combat soldier by equipping him with a clothing suit for all seasons
  • The challenges presented by the demanding requirements of 21st Century combat
  • Lessons learnt from the recent conflict in Iraq and their implications on future developments
  • Technological development programmes dealing with clothing the future soldier
  • Ways forward in the area of soldier clothing
  • 15:20 IMPROVING VISION SYSTEMS FOR SOLDIERS

    Randy L Milbert

    Randy L Milbert , President, Soldier Vision

  • What are the limitations of the Land Warrior’s current vision system?
  • How can one address these limitations?
  • Unit detection – differentiating friend from foe and alerting soldiers of imminent attack
  • Ground guidance – leveraging information about terrain, topology and obstructions to direct ground manoeuvre
  • Balancing precision infantry movements with precision supporting forces
  • The future technological advancements in the situational awareness arena and their implication on future war fighting capabilities
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference followed by Afternoon Tea

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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