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Effective mission planning systems are allowing planning for missions to take place in only a few hours, and incorporate 3-D landscape and terrain visualisation, multiple route planning, re-routing during the mission and interoperability between forces. The digitisation of defence, which incorporates the best of new information technology and artificial intelligence, allows mission planning systems to obtain information from assets on the battlefield and then present it to a strike group in an interactive format. The time taken to plan missions are reduced as tasks such as calculating fuel consumption, threat ranges and best way points can now be accomplished with the aid of computers.

This conference looks at these mission planning systems, which provide knowledge of terrain, location of target, best approaches, defences, weather, collateral hazards and the aggressor’s strengths and weaknesses, and looks at current and future developments, and how they can be applied to any mission - land, air or sea. It will look at how to plan operational missions from conception to completion.

Benefits of attending: Benefits of Attending:
· DEVELOP an awareness of doctrine and policy surrounding mission planning systems
· GAIN an invaluable insight into country specific mission planning and management programmes
· DISCOVER the key enablers to establishing joint and service specific planning initiatives
· LEARN the inherent differences in Force and Unit level planning initiatives
· IDENTIFY the next generation of systems and processes driving military planning

A unique opportunity to gain an insight from leading experts in the field including:
· Colonel Mike Lithgow MBE, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Royal Military Academy of Science Shrivenham
· Lieutenant Commander Mark Gooden, US Navy
· Lieutenant Colonel JW Cooper, R SIGNALS, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine, Command Support Development Centre, HQ Signal Officer in Chief, British Army
· Lieutenant Colonel John M Hill PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, United States Military Academy
· Senior Representative, Exercise Division, NATO
· Captain (Ret'd) Michael Dunaway, Program Manager, Human Systems S&T Department, Office of Naval Research
· Professor Berndt Brehmer, Professor of Command and Control Decision Making, Swedish National Defence College
· Valdur Pille, Group Leader, Metrics and Experimentation, System of Systems Section, Defence Research and Development, Canada
· Andrew Webster, Technical Leader for Rotorcraft Mission Decision Systems, QinetiQ
· Kai Finck, Development Manger, Defense Forces & Public Security SAP AG
· Joel Daniels, Program Manager, Information Dominance Systems, BAE SYSTEMS
· Senior Representative, Northrop Grumman, IT Europe

“Exceeded my expectations with great topics covering a spectrum beyond Mission Planning”
Juan Perez, Director, Modelling and Simulation, Joint Precision Strike Demonstration Project Office, Army-previous SMi delegate

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor Roberto Desimone

Professor Roberto Desimone, Corporate Technical Director, Network-Enabled Systems, QinetiQ

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Colonel Mike Lithgow MBE

Colonel Mike Lithgow MBE, , Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Royal Military Academy of Science Shrivenham

  • Planning and force generation - negotiation and compromises - training - led nation or junior partner? - end-state/exit strategy
  • Meeting and managing expectations
  • Command and control in a joint and coalition operation - how do you make it happen?
  • National sensitivities - freedom or constraint?
  • Implications for future structures and equipment
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Lieutenant Colonel JW Cooper

    Lieutenant Colonel JW Cooper, R SIGNALS, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine, Command Support Development Centre, HQ Signal Officer in Chief, British Army

  • From the introduction of Bowman, Land command and battlespace management will be progressively developed and upgraded on an annual basis
  • Over the next decade commanders will, therefore, expect to see a step change in CBM capability and a progression toward Network Enabled Capability (NEC)
  • The Communications and Information System (CIS) support capability, however, will span a number of differing network infrastructures being rolled out between now and 2012
  • There will also be a gradual draw-down of existing/legacy network infrastructures and the Battlefield Information Infrastructure (BII) will be based upon an amalgam of differing network level capabilities for the foreseeable future
  • CIS mission planning must ensure that differing types of network infrastructure are melded into a coherent capability
  • This demands that effective G6 and CIS C2 arrangements be set in place
  • 10:20 EXERCISE NORTHERN LIGHT

    Senior Representative

    Senior Representative, Exercise Division, NATO

  • Operational capability of participating forces in responding to a crisis situation
  • Remote Environmental Monitoring Units (REMUS)
  • NATO Response Force
  • Nations practising how to carry out objectives under a UN mandate
  • Joint Analysis and Lessons Learned Centre (JALLC)
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COLLABORATIVE INTER-SERVICE MISSION PLANNING - JOINT MISSION PLANNING SYSTEM

    Lieutenant Commander Mark Gooden

    Lieutenant Commander Mark Gooden, , US Navy

  • Collaborative development effort between the Navy, Air Force, Army, Marine Corps and Special Operations Command
  • Provision of a framework to support co-ordinated mission planning within and between the services including coalition partners
  • Defense Information Infrastructure Common Operating Environment (DII COE), C4ISR and Joint Technical Architecture (JTA) compliant
  • Program objectives; ease of use, versatility, integration and cost effectiveness
  • Reducing development, migration and life cycle costs through extensible components, common processes and automated tools
  • Software migration currently used in TAMPS and AFMSS
    Single entry point for weapons planning
  • 12:00 MPS CONNECTIVITY WITH OTHER SYSTEMS

    Alan Thompson

    Alan Thompson, Business Development Manager, Mission Planning Systems, EDS Defence

  • Need for connectivity
  • MPS to MPS
  • MPS to other C2 systems
  • Case study: Trial Heretic
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 INTEGRATED APPROACH FOR AIR MISSION PLANNING

    Valdur Pille

    Valdur Pille, Group Leader, Metrics and Experimentation, System of Systems Section, Defence Research and Development, Canada

  • Canadian Air Force Command and Control Information System (AFCCIS)
  • Meeting and validating requirements for mission support - Wing and Squadron Planner (WASP) - functionality and status
  • Development and integration of a common data model – Air Environmental Data Model (AEDM)
  • Technologies involved in WASP
  • International collaboration
  • WASP future
  • 14:40 JMPS - JOINT MISSION PLANNING SYSTEM

    John Spurgeon

    John Spurgeon, Business Development Manager, Northrop Grumman IT Europe

    15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NAVAL TRAINING AND MISSION PLANNING SYSTEMS

  • Virtual at sea training
  • Battle group operations
  • Co-ordinated ASW / USW
  • Joint urban operations
  • Captain (Ret'd) Michael Dunaway

    Captain (Ret'd) Michael Dunaway, Program Manager, Human Systems S&T Department, Office of Naval Research

    Dr Harold Hawkins

    Dr Harold Hawkins, ONR Program Officer, Virtual At Sea Training System Project, US Navy

    16:20 MISSION LOGISTICS SUPPORT

    Senior Representative

    Senior Representative, , Manugistics

  • Improving short and long-term operations planning
  • Reliance placed on IT to successfully plan, execute and analyse operations
  • Optimising mission logistics support
  • Strategic Network Design (SND) to test and validate solutions
  • Logistics planning; generation and application
  • Reducing reaction time for unforeseen situations
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Roberto Desimone

    Professor Roberto Desimone, Corporate Technical Director, Network-Enabled Systems, QinetiQ

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

    Joel Daniels

    Joel Daniels, Program Manager, Information Dominance Systems, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Air Vehicle Mission Planning Systems for the US Air Force Air Mobility Command (AMC)
  • USAF AMC mission planning CONOPS for Tanker, Airlift and Special Mission Aircraft (TASM)
  • Mission Planning Tools Architecture
  • Portable Flight Planning System and the Aircraft Components (TASM AWE)
  • Air Refuelling (KC-135, KC-10) Planning Tools
  • Airlift (C-17, C-130J) Planning Tools Update on USAF CNS/ATM Navigation Database certification (for KC-135, KC-10, C-5 and C-130 AMP)
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Berndt Brehmer

    Berndt Brehmer, Professor of Command and Control Decision Making, Swedish National Defense College

  • Improvements to former command and control architectures
  • Recognising C2 requirements
  • Implementation
  • Ways to proceed
  • C2DC for strategic command and control functions; enabling warfighters to plan, execute and manage military operations
  • 10:20 TACTICAL DECISION TOOLS

    Andrew Webster

    Andrew Webster, Technical Leader for Rotorcraft Mission Decision Systems, QinetiQ

  • In-flight situation awareness and re-routing tools
  • Decision tools for use with an integrated DAS
  • Reconnaissance Planning Tools
  • The Real-time onboard MPS requirement
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SIMULATION SUPPORT FOR MISSION PLANNING

    Lieutenant Colonel John M Hill PhD

    Lieutenant Colonel John M Hill PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, United States Military Academy

  • The OneSAF simulation System
  • Use of simulations for research in mission planning
  • Determining mission planning aspects for intelligent missile swarms
  • 12:00 MISSION SUPPORT SYSTEM

  • Modular architecture based on network IT system
  • Planning, Briefing and Debriefing functions
  • Software architecture and controlled application interfaces
  • Automated Mission Planning capabilities
  • Incorporating new technologies and capabilities
  • Fulvio Salzone

    Fulvio Salzone, EF2000 ILS Technical Programme Manager, Alenia Aeronautica

    Olindo Pecce

    Olindo Pecce, EF2000 MSS Technical Responsible, Alenia Aeronautica

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 IT-SUPPORT FOR PLANNING OF DEPLOYED OPERATIONS

    Dipl. Ing. Kai Finck

    Dipl. Ing. Kai Finck, Development Manager, Defense Forces & Public Security, SAP AG

  • Resource transparency as a key for effective planning
  • Capability based planning of task forces
  • Planning process for personnel and materiel
  • Seamless integration from planning to execution
  • Organisational flexibility
  • Interfaces to NATO - and national systems
  • 14:40 CREATING A NATIONAL M&S/SE FRAMEWORK

    Stephane-Michel Albert

    Stephane-Michel Albert, Business Development Manager, CAE MS&T, New Technologies / Modelling and Simulation

  • Objectives and strategic plan
  • Policy, standards and requirements
  • Operational collaborations
  • Maximising efficiency and effectiveness
  • HLA and interoperability
  • Research
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE RECOGNISED ENVIRONMENT PICTURE (REP)

    JJ Bowley

    JJ Bowley, Business Manager, TENET Defence

  • Impact of the environment on recent missions
  • How can REP can be achieved
  • Future capability
  • 16:20 MILITARY MISSION PLANNING IN 3D

    Jonathan Shears

    Jonathan Shears, Senior Defence Consultant, Infoterra Defence

  • A problem of data and not tools - deriving multi-scale 3D database content for military Mission Planning in a precision engagement environment for; - navigation - targeting - situational awareness - Special Ops
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS); gaining greater intelligence through efficient data integration for military operations to achieve optimal information superiority
  • 3D visualisation technologies - distributed battlespace visualisation to enhance situational awareness
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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