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Although the fratricide rate in the Iraq war is likely to end up as one of the lowest in modern warfare, several incidents show how prone combat still is to equipment glitches and human errors. Despite the millions of dollars the military spent since the 1991 Persian Gulf War to reduce such incidents, some of the most advanced equipment failed to live up to its promise or never made it to the Iraqi battlefield because of budget cuts. This is likely to renew the debate concerning the extent of capability improvements necessary to mitigate fratricide rates at the level exhibited in Operation Desert Storm.

This conference will identify and assess the current plans and future developments in combat ID & IFF from an international perspective, determining the potential impact of initiatives on future warfare. More specifically, it will discuss the plans, policies and doctrine implemented by the US, NATO, UK and other key players in the combat ID arena.

In addition, the main advancements in technological capabilities in the ground-to-ground, air-to-ground, and air-to-air domains will be considered. Furthermore, this event will provide a discussion element led by a panel of experts to ascertain the key initiatives that require focus in the imminent future. Country specific case studies, and key lessons learned will also be reviewed, focussing on the recent operations in Iraq and forthcoming plans.This is the fourthconference in the series and we are aiming to build on the very successful event in March of this year.

A unique opportunity to learn from leading military and research experts including:

  • Colonel Timothy Cherry, Training and Doctrine Command System Manager, Combat Identification and Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (TRADOC), US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Gregory Palka, Chief, Concepts and Initiatives Division, Space and Missile Defense Battle Lab, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Lloyd Crosman, Product Manager, Target Identification and Meteorological Sensors, US Army
  • Colonel Christopher Gallavan, US Army Safety Center
  • William Suttie, Dstl, Ministry of Defence, UK and International Chairman Combat Identification Technical Working Group
  • Brian Hughes, US Representative, NATO Identification System Co-ordination Office (NISCO), NATO HQ
  • Dr Folk Horneck, Project Manager ZEFF Program, U31-Project Identification, Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB)
  • Michael Badger, Director, Joint Concepts Development C2D, RDECOM, US Army
  • Robert Hintz, Chairman, NATO SET
  • Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University of Abertay
  • Dr Larry Lewis, Research Staff, Center for Naval Analyses
  • Dr Charles Kirke, Lecturer, Human Factors Integration, Cranfield University

Benefits of Attending:

  • CONSIDER various country perspectives, addressing military doctrine, requirements and the challenges of military operations in the urban environment
  • ANALYSE training, deployment and modernisation issues
  • EVALUATE how technologies need to be developed for implementation in the battlespace
  • REFLECT on lessons learned whilst assessing how these should be applied in present-day and future conflict situations
  • EXPLORE advanced concepts to develop new tactics, techniques, and procedures to refine force structure requirements and train forces to adapt to the changing requirements of the 21st Century battlefield

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Malcolm Cook

Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University Of Abertay

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS
LESSONS LEARNED: US PERSPECTIVE

Lieutenant General James Mattis

Lieutenant General James Mattis, Commanding General, Marine Corps Combat Development Command/Deputy Commandant for Combat Development, US Marine Corps

  • Experiences during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm
  • Learning from the past to improve the future
  • Developments from a capability perspective
  • Forward planning in combat ID
  • 9:50 NATO PERSPECTIVE ON COMBAT ID

    Brian Hughes

    Brian Hughes, US Representative, NATO Identification System Co-ordination Office (NISCO), NATO HQ

  • Policy for prioritising goals and objectives
  • Lessons learned from previous NATO missions
  • Implementation of new capabilities: replacement for Mk XII IFF
  • Developments in strategies and procedures
  • Future initiatives co-ordinated by NATO for combat ID
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 US DEVELOPMENTS IN COMBAT ID

  • CCID ACTD and the path ahead
  • Current force and FCS
  • Joint Combat Identification Marking Systems (JCIMS)
  • Daniel Schwartz

    Daniel Schwartz, Lead Product Engineer, PM Target Identification and Meteorological Sensors, US Army

    11:40 GERMAN APPROACH TO COMBAT ID

    Dr Folk Horneck

    Dr Folk Horneck, Project Manager, ZEFF Program, U3-1 Project Identification, Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB)

  • Ground to ground identification, platforms and individual soldiers (ZEFF Program)
  • Air-to-air identification
  • Air-to-surface (ground) identification
  • Identification among coalition, combined and joint forces
  • Future plans
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 BLUE FORCE SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

    Lieutenant Colonel Gregory Palka

    Lieutenant Colonel Gregory Palka, Chief, Concepts & Initiatives Division, Space and Missile Defence Battle Lab, US Army

  • Overview of the JBFSA ACTD
  • The advantages of the JBFSA Enterprise Solution
  • Capability requirements
  • Forward thinking
  • 14:30 SITUATIONAL AWARENESS AND BATTLESPACE AWARENESS

    Michael Badger

    Michael Badger, Director, Joint Concepts Development C2D, RDECOM, US Army

  • The advantages of situational awareness
  • Tracking ground objects
  • Real time data for tactical decision-makers
  • Interoperability between services and coalition partners through net-centricity
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 GROUND-TO-GROUND TECHNOLOGIES

  • Trials and the results obtained
  • Co-ordinating allied participation
  • Limitations of present capabilities
  • Future plans and initiatives
  • William Suttie

    William Suttie, Dstl, Minstry of Defence, UK and International Chairman, Combat Identification Technical Working Group

    16:20 AN IFF CAPABILITY FOR AIRCRAFT, SHIPS AND MISSILE AIR DEFENCE SYSTEMS

    Phillip Dawson

    Phillip Dawson, Head, Airborne and SIFF Programmes, Raytheon

  • Overview of the programme
  • Advantages of the system in addressing technological requirements
  • Integration into the armed forces
  • The way ahead
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:00 N-DIMENSIONAL EYESAFE IMAGING LADAR TECHNOLOGY

  • Overview of the RTG-45 LADAR ATR Workshop
  • Examples of laser radar signatures from a variety of military targets
  • Various levels of automatic target recognition
  • LADAR to perform combat identification function for radar and passive IR sensors
  • State of the art for LADAR ATR and 3-5 year projections
  • Dr Rudy Buser

    Dr Rudy Buser, Member at Large SET Electro-Optics Programs, RGB Associates

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Malcolm Cook

    Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University Of Abertay

    9:10 THE US ARMY’S PERSPECTIVE ON COMBAT ID

    Colonel Timothy Cherry

    Colonel Timothy Cherry, Training and Doctrine Command System Manager (TRADOC), Combat Identification and Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below, US Army

  • Awareness and Target ID
  • Findings from the Army-Marine Corps CID study
  • Situational awareness gaps and recommendations
  • Target ID gaps and recommendations
  • TRADOC involvement in the CCID ACTD
  • Future plans and initiatives
  • 9:50 THE VIEW FROM THE SKY: THE AIRMAN'S PERSPECTIVE OF COMBAT ID

    Jack Hayes

    Jack Hayes, (Titan Corp), Combat ID Senior Operations Analyst, Directorate of Requirements, Systems Support Division, HQ Air Combat Command, US Air Force

  • The US Air Force perspective on combat ID in the joint battlespace
  • Current capabilities and limitations
  • Technologic and procedural opportunities
  • Combat ID in doctrine and rules of engagement
  • The way ahead
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 LESSONS LEARNED FOR FRATRICIDE

  • The relationship between fratricide and mission effectiveness
  • IFF, interoperability, and fratricide
  • Lessons learned for air-to-ground fratricides
  • Lessons learned for ground-to-air-fratricides
  • Near-term and long-term recommendations
  • Dr Larry Lewis

    Dr Larry Lewis, Research Staff, Center for Naval Analyses

    11:30 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Chaired by: Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University of Abertay
    Lieutenant Colonel Gregory Palka

    Lieutenant Colonel Gregory Palka, Chief, Concepts & Initiatives Division, Space and Missile Defence Battle Lab, US Army

    Michael Badger

    Michael Badger, Director, Joint Concepts Development C2D, RDECOM, US Army

    William Suttie

    William Suttie, Dstl, Minstry of Defence, UK and International Chairman, Combat Identification Technical Working Group

    12:30 Networking Lunch

    13:50 HUMAN FACTORS IN COMBAT IDENTIFICATION

    Dr Malcolm Cook

    Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University Of Abertay

  • Cognitive and task analytic approaches to combat ID
  • Human error in combat ID
  • Automation of combat ID
  • Visual identification in combat ID
  • Targeting tasks in future unmanned combat systems
  • 14:30 HUMAN FACTORS

    Claire Outteridge

    Claire Outteridge, Consultant Psychologist, QinetiQ

  • The size of the problem
  • Examining historical evidence of fratricide
  • Understanding fratricide causality
  • Historical case study analysis
  • Exploiting human factors to reduce the risk of fratricide
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 COMBAT ID: COCKTAIL OR STRUCTURE?

  • Review of approaches to combat ID in UK over past 30 years
  • Analysis of principles and trends
  • The systems engineering approach
  • Discussion: does such an approach offer a viable alternative?
  • Dr Charles Kirke

    Dr Charles Kirke, Lecturer, Human Factors Integration, Cranfield University

    16:20 FUTURE PLANS TO PREVENT FRATRICIDE

    Colonel Christopher Gallavan

    Colonel Christopher Gallavan, , US Army Safety Center

  • Policies and doctrine for forthcoming combat ID
  • Training capability improvements
  • Technological requirements
  • The U.S Army Safety Center’s future plans in combat ID
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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