Home
overview
With the current world climate forcing the requirement for higher levels of efficiency and flexibility in defence maintenance, this conference will focus on the implications of recent military operations on national maintenance policy. As the military expands to meet the global demands, the conference will address how nations are meeting this challenge of operational deployment, by looking at near term military requirements, fleet readiness and the trend of partnering with private sector.

This conference will discuss in detail the key maintenance concepts, showing how best to optimise process technologies, demonstrating this through lessons learned on the battlefield. It will also discuss how to minimise total life cycle cost ownership, exploring the variety of maintenance support structures available and showing how they can help achieve a maximum return on your assets. It will also address the latest maintenance technology developments, which are aiming to improve reliability, maintainability and supportability.

OBTAIN policy forecasts on national maintenance strategy and development
LEARN cutting edge solutions to improve operations
ACHIEVE maximum return on your assets through asset management
HEAR lessons learned from the battlefield
UNDERSTAND the latest maintenance strategies and how they can help you deliver optimal efficiency

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Colonel Tracy Ellis, Commander, Tobyhanna Army Depot, United States Army
  • Colonel Graham Hughes, Chief Engineer, DEME (A), Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Sherman, IPT Leader, Helicopter and Islander Combined, Rotary Wing Cluster, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel Dave Painter, Head of Future Business, Ministry of Defence UK, ABRO
  • Major Spike Cope REME, Officer Commanding, Equipment Support Squadron, Commando Logistics Regiment, Royal Marines
  • Major Stefan Eerlingen MSc Eng, Directorate General Material Resources Systems Division, Chief Material Manager Helicopters, Belgian Ministry of Defence
  • David Greemore, Head, Naval Shipyard Management Systems Engineering Division, Naval Sea Systems Command
  • Albert Stam MSc, Head, Maintenance Engineering, Royal Netherlands Navy Maintenance Establishment
  • Dr John Stavenuiter, Head, System Management, Royal Netherlands Navy Maintenance Establishment
  • Tim Russell, Manager, Strategic Business Development, NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency (NAMSA)
  • Dennis Hoyland, Assistant Director, Corporate Technical Services, Customer Support Services, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Steve Collom, DDSA TLM Team, Ministry of Defence, UK

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

8:50 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Derek Wright

Dr Derek Wright, Director, Derek Wright Associates Ltd

9:00 THE TOBYHANNA ARMY DEPOT

Colonel Tracy Ellis

Colonel Tracy Ellis, Commander, Tobyhanna Army Depot, US Army

  • Introduction to the largest, full service communications and electronics maintenance facility
  • TYAD’s critical role in US defence maintenance
  • Equipment and systems supported
  • Forward repair activities
  • The future of maintenance at TYAD
  • 9:40 OPTIMISING DEFENCE MAINTENANCE

    Major Stefan Eerlingen

    Major Stefan Eerlingen, Chief Material Manager Helicopters, Belgian Ministry of Defence - Directorate General Material Resources

  • Organisation BMOD
  • Integrated Management of Material resources
  • Maintenance models and indicators
  • Modular & flexible operational needs
  • Re-engineering the support organisation
  • Impact of ERP tools
  • 10:20 UNITED STATES NAVAL SHIPYARDS

    David  Greemore

    David Greemore, Head, Naval Shipyard Management Systems Engineering Division, Naval Sea Systems Command

  • Background and overview
  • Aligning to Sea Power 21 – US Navy vision
  • One shipyard - transformation strategy
  • Applying Lean/Six Sigma, theory of constraints and Business Process Reengineering (BPR)
  • Establishing the governance process
  • Discipline to process is key
  • Partnering with industry
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Chaired by: Dr Derek Wright, Director, Derek Wright Associates Ltd

    Tim Russell

    Tim Russell, Manager,Strategic Business Development, NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency

    Colonel Tracy Ellis

    Colonel Tracy Ellis, Commander, Tobyhanna Army Depot, US Army

    Albert Stam MSc

    Albert Stam MSc, Head of Maintenance Engineering, Royal Netherlands Navy Maintenance Establishment
    View Bio

    Graham Hughes

    Graham Hughes, Chief Engineer, DEME (A), Ministry of Defence UK

    12:00 ENHANCING SUPPORTABILITY

    Julian Dayment

    Julian Dayment, Consultant, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Assessment of maintenance performance
  • Analysis of feedback data
  • Determining trends
  • Identifying threats and opportunities
  • Simulation of enhanced operation
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 OPTIMISED MAINTENANCE

    Mark Lee

    Mark Lee, Executive Consultant, LSC Group

  • Increasing availability through improved reliability and sustainability
  • The importance of end-to-end, Through life maintenance management
  • The benefits of service-based, value-adding maintenance strategies
  • Understanding the costs and risks involved in delivery<\LI>
  • 14:40 THE NATO MAINTENANCE AND SUPPLY AGENCY

    Tim Russell

    Tim Russell, Manager,Strategic Business Development, NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency

  • Background – Support since first NATO operation in 1995
  • NAMSA Host Nation Support for NATO Capability Packages
  • NATO Security Investment Program Contracting Support
  • Future Directions
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 COST EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT CONTROL OF CAPITAL ASSETS

    Dr John Stavenuiter

    Dr John Stavenuiter, Head System Management, Royal Netherlands Navy Maintenance Establishment

  • Goals to achieve
    -operational performance needed
    -control on total cost of ownership
    -minimum owners risks
  • Problems to tackle
    -Operational needs are often insufficiently defined, or subject to permanent changes
    -Logistic results are not clearly related to the operational needs and therefore difficult to measure
    -Inconsistent and unreliable management information to control the logistic processes
    -A lack of corporate vision, mindset and attitude
  • 16:20 THE DUTCH PERSPECTIVE

    Albert Stam MSc

    Albert Stam MSc, Head of Maintenance Engineering, Royal Netherlands Navy Maintenance Establishment
    View Bio

  • Why: motivation for structured maintenance
  • From concepts to implementation
  • Organisation
  • Information modelling
  • Lessons learned
  • Results
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Benjamin Dobson

    Benjamin Dobson, Naval Support Business Development Manager, Devenport Management Limited

    9:10 WHOLE LIFE COSTING IN THE MOD

  • What is whole life costing (WLC) and Through Life Management (TLM) ?
  • How WLC complements Through Life Management Plans(TLMPs)
  • Benefits of WLC
  • Future challenges for WLC and TLM
  • Graham Watson

    Graham Watson, Training Manager, DDSA TLM Team

    9:50 THE ROLE OF STANDARDS IN DEFENCE MAINTENANCE

    Dennis Hoyland

    Dennis Hoyland, Assistant Director Corporate Technical Services, Customer Support Services, Ministry of Defence

  • Background to DSTAN 00-60
  • The use of standards in defence maintenance
  • The link between Through Life Supporting instructions, guidance and contracting standards
  • Replacement to Defence Standard 00-60
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 BATTLEFIELD MAINTENANCE

    Graham Hughes

    Graham Hughes, Chief Engineer, DEME (A), Ministry of Defence UK

  • Problems of maintaining equipment in the field
  • Is CLS compatible with the operational environment
  • Overcoming maintenance problems
  • The future of "in theatre" maintenance
  • 11:40 AN EQUIPMENT SUPPORT PERSPECTIVE OF OP TELIC

    Spike Cope

    Spike Cope, Officer Commanding Equipment Support Squadron, Commando Logistics Regiment

  • Introduction to the Equipment Support Squadron
  • Assets used in the field
  • Ensuring the reliability of frontline equipment under strict time constraints
  • Particular challenges encountered
  • Lessons learned in field maintenance during OP TELIC
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 MISSION SUPPORT IN PRACTISE

    Ari Tolonen

    Ari Tolonen, Maintenance Manager, Patria

  • Key factors of mission support maintenance
  • Co-operation between parties in mission support
  • Lessons learned during 20 years of mission support
  • Mission support in practise today – Lebanon, Syria, Kosovo, Iraq and others
  • Ways of the future
  • 14:30 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) TO MEET DEFENCE AVIATION MAINTENANCE NEEDS

    Matthew Tobin

    Matthew Tobin, Vice President, Mxi Technologies Ltd.

  • Meeting the needs of maintenance
  • Linking maintenance and logistics: getting field data to thesupply chain
  • Handling deployed/detached operations
  • The case for COTS: Maintenance IT for Joint Strike Fighter
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CONTRACTING FOR AVAILABILITY WITH MILITARY HELICOPTERS

    Lieutenant Colonel John Sherman

    Lieutenant Colonel John Sherman, IPT Leader, Helicopter and Islander Combined, Rotary Wing Cluster, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministy of Defence

  • The evolution from CLS to contracting for availability
  • Some current examples
  • The benefits for Defence
  • Lessons learned from the helicopter experience
  • How far can we go?
  • 16:20 MEETING LAND SYSTEMS MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS

    Lieutenant Colonel Dave Painter

    Lieutenant Colonel Dave Painter, Head of Future Business, ABRO

  • The role of industry and ABRO
  • Introducing lean processes
  • The civilian and military mix
  • Challenges
  • The future
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Reliability and Maintainability: Reliability Centred Maintenance
    Workshop

    Reliability and Maintainability: Reliability Centred Maintenance

    Jurys Great Russell Street Hotel
    1st March 2005
    London, United Kingdom

    Human Factors in Defence Maintenance
    Workshop

    Human Factors in Defence Maintenance

    Jurys Great Russell Street Hotel
    4th March 2005
    London, United Kingdom

    Jurys Great Russell Street Hotel

    16-22 Great Russell Street
    London WC1B 3NN
    United Kingdom

    Jurys Great Russell Street Hotel

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.