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THE HELICOPTER EVENT OF 2005 IS HERE

Military Rotorcraft - attaining 24/7 capability to meet the future requirements of a force

The increased need for speed and agility within future military operations has resulted in the helicopter's involvement changing dramatically to incorporate a more overall role regarding logistical support, military support and increased firepower, surveillance and peacekeeping. Military helicopter forces in the last few years have been at the forefront of operations in the Balkans, Afghanistan and Iraq.

With the current 'state of play' of military helicopters currently uncertain within the majority of defence forces there is great interest as to what is going to happen and when. I.e. to what extent in the future should a force utilise the rotorcraft, which rotorcraft should they concentrate upon to ensure operational success and how this can be enhanced through training and maintenance?

Military Rotorcraft will address the many issues pertaining from Iraq and Afghanistan, looking at lessons learned and the requirements that have since been identified. The conference will also address the role of the helicopter in force transformation, country specific policy and doctrine towards helicopter programmes, updates on these programmes, avionics, logistical support, training and research and development.

Military Rotorcraft will provide the perfect forum for discussing the future of rotorcraft and should therefore not be missed by anyone in the industry.

PLUS...

A newly added presentation from Air Commodore Hamed Nasser, Commandant, Sultan Qaboos Air Academy, Royal Air Force of Oman on their experiences with the NH-90

Hear from THE leading military and industry experts including…

  • Air Vice Marshal Paul Luker OBE AFC, Commmander, Joint Helicopter Command
  • Brigadier General William Phillips, Deputy Program Executive Officer, Army Aviation, US Army
  • Brigadier Nick Knudsen, Team Leader, Attack Helicopter Integrated Project Team, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Commodore Ian Tibbit, Director, Logistics (Rotary Wing), DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Air Commodore Hamed Nasser, Commandant, Sultan Qaboos Air Academy, Royal Air Force of Oman
  • Group Captain Jim Goodbourn, Search and Rescue Force Commander, RAF
  • Commander Mark Sheehan, Commanding Officer, Lynx Helicopter Force, Royal Navy
  • Commander Mark Deaney, Team Leader, HUMS Integrated Project Team, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Commander David Lilley, Requirements Manager, UKMFTS Integrated Project Team, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Pelczynski, Program Manager, CH-47F Improved Cargo Helicopter, PEO Aviation, US Army 
  • Lieutenant Colonel Bruce Ploughman, Commanding Officer, 423 Maritime Helicopter Squadron, Canadian Air Force
  • Squadron Leader Sean O'Connor, Air Operations Branch (A3 OAC), NATO Air Component Command
  • Raymond Pietruszka, Deputy Project Manager, Aviation Electronic Systems, US Army
  • Dr Jon Cook, Head, Aircraft Health Monitoring Group, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry Of Defence, UK
  • Nick Carter, Head of Enablers, UKMFTS Integrated Project Team, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

Conference chaired by...

  • Captain Elfan Ap Rees, Publisher/Editor, Helicopter International, Military Helicopter News and HeliData News

The aims and objectives of the conference:

EXPLORE the changing role of the Military Helicopter within force transformation
LEARN from recent conflicts and operations the current and future operational requirements of helicopter missions
HEAR updates on the key international helicopter programmes
UNDERSTAND the growing importance of sustainability and self-defence
IDENTIFY tactical developments and logistical challenges in helicopter operations
EXAMINE technology advancements to meet 24/7 capability

THIS CONFERENCE SHOULD NOT BE MISSED BY ANYONE IN THE INDUSTRY!

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Captain Elfan Ap Rees

Captain Elfan Ap Rees, Publisher & Editor, Helicopter International and Military Helicopter News, Avia Press Associates

9:10 THE CHANGING ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MILITARY ROTORCRAFT

Air Vice Marshal Paul Luker OBE AFC

Air Vice Marshal Paul Luker OBE AFC, Commander, Joint Helicopter Command

  • The future of military rotorcraft – the need to restructure and develop a helicopter force within a future force
  • Current helicopter capabilities and ensuring future 24/7 capabilities
  • Can there be integration of attack, tactical transport, heavy lift and civil role capabilities (exploration, fire fighting, law enforcement) in the future helicopter?
  • The role of the Joint Helicopter Command in the future
  • The importance of commonality within military rotorcraft programmes
  • 9:50 ESTABLISHING, MAINTAINING AND DEVELOPING A ROTORCRAFT COMMAND WITHIN A FORCE

    Brigadier General William Phillips

    Brigadier General William Phillips, Deputy Program Executive Officer, Army Aviation, US Army

  • Are rotorcraft programs independent of one another or should the focus be on inter-linked programs producing a collective force?
  • Key progressions within the US Army’s rotorcraft programs
  • With the continuing development and progression of rotorcraft technology and mission involvement, should we keep one eye on maintaining what we already have?
  • Transforming the force – the role the rotorcraft will play and how ‘fleet’ modernisation can help further this role
  • Deciding upon the correct path for rotorcraft modernisation and force transformation
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 LOGISTIC SUPPORT FOR ROTARY WING

    Commodore Ian Tibbit

    Commodore Ian Tibbit, Director, Logistics (Rotary Wing), Defence Logistics Organisation

  • The importance of effective logistic support within the battlefield
  • UK Rotary Wing logistics – smoothing the end-to-end process
  • How have the requirements for rotary wing support changed and what have we learned from recent operations/conflicts?
  • An emerging trend – outsourcing some aspects to commercial helicopters and crews
  • 11:40 THE ROLE OF ROTARY WING AVIATION IN THE NEW NATO ENVIRONMENT

    Squadron Leader Sean O'Connor

    Squadron Leader Sean O'Connor, Air Operations Branch (A3-OAC), NATO Air Component Command

  • Combined helicopter operations in support of ISAF Afghanistan (rotary wing CAS, Quick Reaction Force operations, combat recovery, mixed force operations)
  • Command and control challenges (scarce assets require central tasking and control, communications and re-tasking, conflicting national criteria and standards)
  • Emerging roles (the psychological dimension, Effects Based Planning, targeting)
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 FROM THE SEA

    Senior Representative

    Senior Representative, Fleet Air Arm, Royal Navy

  • Current rotorcraft capabilities and options for the future
  • Royal Navy rotorcraft force structures for optimised deployable capability
  • Operations from the sea – the challenge
  • 14:30 THE UK MILITARY FLYING TRAINING SYSTEM (UKMFTS)

  • The boundaries of UKMFTS, UKMFTS concept, holistic pipeline-design considerations and the integration of Rotary Wing (RW) requirements
  • RW requirement analysis and capture – the necessary training requirements for aircrews operating in the future digitised joint battlefield
  • Bridging the gaps in capability, quantitative training versus qualitative training and achieving the optimised live/synthetic balance of training
  • Building on best practice and experience of training provision at the Defence Helicopter Flying School (DHFS) and the links with key stakeholders in Fleet, JHC and industry
  • The next step in the programme – where and what next for the UKMFTS?
  • Commander David Lilley

    Commander David Lilley, Head Requirements Manager, UKMFTS Integrated Project Team, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence UK

    Nick Carter

    Nick Carter, Head of Enablers, UKMFTS Integrated Project Team, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence UK

    15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 ROTOR WING AVIATION SURVIVABILITY EQUIPMENT (ASE)

    Raymond Pietruszka

    Raymond Pietruszka, Deputy Project Manager, Aviation Electronic Systems, US Army

  • The changing environment and its impact on ASE systems
  • The case for integrated systems
  • The challenge integrated systems have on testing
  • The evolving threat and its impact on ASE design
  • The case for integrated systems
  • The challenge integrated systems have on testing
  • The evolving threat and its impact on ASE design
  • What the future helicopter must have
  • 16:20 HELICOPTER HEALTH AND USAGE MONITORING SYSTEMS (HUMS)

  • An overview of HUMS, including certification issues
  • The potential benefits of advanced HUMS for future helicopters
  • Benefits from using HUMS – examples from the RAF Chinook fleet
  • Problems and failures so far and how we can overcome these in the future
  • The future of HUMS (aircraft lifting, data fusion, predictive maintenance)
  • Commander Mark Deaney

    Commander Mark Deaney, Team Leader, HUMS Integrated Project Team, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Dr Jon Cook

    Dr Jon Cook, Head, Aircraft Health Monitoring Group, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence UK

    17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Captain Elfan Ap Rees

    Captain Elfan Ap Rees, Publisher & Editor, Helicopter International and Military Helicopter News, Avia Press Associates

    9:10 ATTACK HELICOPTERS WITHIN THE BRITISH ARMED FORCES

    Brigadier Nick Knudsen

    Brigadier Nick Knudsen, Team Leader, Attack Helicopter Integrated Project Team, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The capabilities of the Attack Helicopter and the benefits to the UK Defence Capability
  • From Initial Operating Capability to Full Operating Capability
  • The Aviation Battle Group – how is support progressing?
  • Operational experience so far and lessons learnt from the US programme
  • 9:50 CURRENT AND FUTURE SEARCH AND RESCUE (SAR) WITHIN THE BRITISH ARMED FORCES

    Group Captain Jim Goodbourn

    Group Captain Jim Goodbourn, Station Commander, R A F St Mawgan

  • Current SAR capability within the British Armed Forces (Sea King Mk3,3a,5)
  • UK SAR operating techniques
  • What have we learned from recent operations, including the necessary future requirements of SAR helicopters?
  • Maintaining our current capabilities – the logistical and maintenance roles within the SAR fleet
  • The future of UK SAR - harmonisation
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE NH-90 WITHIN THE ROYAL AIR FORCE OF OMAN (RAFO)

    Air Commodore Hamed Nasser

    Air Commodore Hamed Nasser, Commandant, Sultan Quaboos Air Academy, Royal Air Force of Oman

  • Current and future rotorcraft capabilities of the RAFO
  • Meeting the future requirements (airborne mine countermeasures, AH, Combat SAR)
  • What capabilities does the RAFO believe will most beneficial within the future battlefield and how the NH-90 will attain these?
  • The procurement process – deciding upon the NH-90
  • The future of the NH-90 and indeed rotorcraft within the RAFO and the Middle East as a whole
  • 11:40 THE ROLE OF THE LYNX HELICOPTER WITHIN THE CURRENT AND FUTURE BATTLEFIELDS

    Commander Mark Sheehan

    Commander Mark Sheehan, Commanding Officer, Lynx Helicopter Force, Royal Navy

  • The current capabilities of the Maritime Lynx
  • Maintaining what we already have – logistical support challenges for the current fleet of Lynx
  • Will the Lynx feature as a force within the future of the Royal Navy?
  • What are the future requirements of the Royal Navy in new rotorcraft – what has emerged from operational experience?
  • Are there other alternatives beside the Lynx, and if so, what?
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE CAPABILITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MARITIME HELICOPTER (MH) WITHIN THE CANADIAN AIR FORCE AND A FUTURE COALITION FORCE

    Lieutenant Colonel Bruce Ploughman

    Lieutenant Colonel Bruce Ploughman, Commanding Officer, 423 Maritime Helicopter Squadron, Canadian Air Force

  • Evolution of the MH role and responsibility
  • The current and future capabilities of the MH within the Canadian Air Force
  • The MH's performance in recent operations (Op Friction, Op Deliverance)
  • Emerging future requirements for the MH from these operations
  • The future MH and its anticipated operational role with the Canadian Air Force and a coalition force
  • 14:30 CH-47F IMPROVED CARGO HELICOPTER (ICH)

    Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Pelczynski

    Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Pelczynski, Program Manager, CH-47F Improved Cargo Helicopter, PEO Aviation, US Army

  • The importance of effective support for the future battlefield
  • The past, present and future role of the Chinook
  • Capability enhancements and fleet modernisation - preparing for upgrades and retrofits
  • What capabilities are still needed in order to meet all future requirements?
  • The future of the program - where do we go after the CH-47F?
  • Joint Heavy-lift vs. Chinook
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THE HELICOPTER INDUSTRY?

    Roberto Garavaglia

    Roberto Garavaglia, Vice President Marketing, Agusta Westland

  • Ensuring technical innovation and application
  • Co-operating to optimise research and development progress - what must the helicopter industry consider in the future?
  • Operational feedback from the EH101
  • The next step for the EH101 – emerging requirements for the future
  • What does the future hold for both the military helicopter and Agusta Westland?
  • The role of Finmeccanica
  • 16:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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