Home
overview
This conference will address the emerging and future demands of the military in supporting national and multinational deployments. This conference will also analyse solutions being offered by contractors in supporting forward deployments in future operations. It will analyse the advantages and perceived risks and challenges associated with contracting out support solutions. Supporting the Forward Deployment 2003 will give case studies focusing on deployment experiences for recent operations, specifically looking at the various logistical aspects, challenges and future requirements. Case studies will also include supporting individual platforms, analysis of logistical projects and programmes as well as individual country perspectives. The underlying theme will be how to provide cost effective means to support the 21st Century soldier in the field.

A two day intensive conference which will help you:
· UNDERSTAND the future requirements of forward deployment
· IDENTIFY the emerging trends of logistic support
· ASSESS feasible and cost-effective logistic strategy
· MAXIMISE your capacity for supporting the forward deployed forces
· GAIN insider knowledge and LEARN lessons from case studies of topical operations

Gain an insight from the key industry speakers in the field:
· Brigadier Andrew Stewart, Director of Overseas Military Activity, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Phil Naylor, Director of Operations, Defence Storage and Distribution Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Nick Knudsen, Head of Logistics, Joint Helicopter Command Headquarters, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Johannes Amting, Branch Chief Concepts and Plans, German Air Force Material Command
· Group Captain Ron Simpson, Assistant Director, Business Improvements (Information), ES (Air), Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Steve Miller, Division Chief, Mobility Division J-4, US Department of Defense
· Lieutenant Colonel David Adams, Head of International Defence Training (Army), International Defence Training (Army)
· Lieutenant Colonel Richard Wakefield, SO1 Systems, E&AM CCT, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Commander Brian Nelson, Chief of Policy, RHQ AF SOUTH
· Hakon Thuve, Chief, Applications Development Branch, NATO C3 Agency
· Don Trautner, Program Manager, Logistics Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP), Operations Support Command, Army Material Command, US Army
· Peter Jones, Chief Executive, Medical Supplies Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Randal Lewis, Senior Logistics Analyst for Contractors accompanying the Force, US Army
· Dr Derek Wright, Director of Logistics, Acquisition & Logistics Unit, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science
· Ray Schaible, Program Director, Operational Logistics Group, Logistics Management Institute
· Jan Lauridsen, Managing Director, DCS Group
· Per-Olov Pettersson, Director of Business Development ILS, Ericsson Microwave Systems
· Augden W. Short, Program Manager, Dyncorp International… A CSC Company

Confirmed chairmen:
· Major General (Ret’d) Murray Wildman CBE, Director, Defence Business Solutions
· Major General (Ret’d) John Stokoe CB CBE, Managing Director, Amey Defence

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Major General Murray Wildman (rtd) CBE

Major General Murray Wildman (rtd) CBE, Managing Director , Defence Business Solutions

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS THE REQUIREMENTS OF 21ST CENTURY SUPPORT

Colonel Raymond V. Mason

Colonel Raymond V. Mason, Deputy Director for Power Projection & Sustainment, J-4, US Department of Defense

  • Identifying the spectrum and nature of future conflict
  • Introducing new logistical limitations facing deployment support
  • New processes to combat such challenges: - Emerging trends - Innovative technologies - New support programmes - Industry requirements
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS SUPPORTING FUTURE FORWARD DEPLOYMENT WITHIN JOINT OPERATIONS OVERSEAS

    Brigadier Andrew Stewart

    Brigadier Andrew Stewart, Director of Overseas Military Activity, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Strategic context of forward deployment overseas
  • UK military deployments since 2000 – CASE STUDIES - Sierra Leone - Afghanistan
  • Support measures: - General training - Medical - Transport - Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance - Communications - Planning - Life support
  • Future support to enhance future capability
  • 10:20 SPECIAL ADDRESS NATO DEPLOYMENT SUPPORT

    Commander Brian Nelson

    Commander Brian Nelson, Chief of Policy, RHQ AF SOUTH

  • The need for multinational as opposed to national logistics
  • Identifying and resolving problems within joint support operations
  • Recognising the global future
  • Potential solutions
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 NATO DEPLOYMENT SUPPORT - THE ADAMS CONCEPT

    Hakon Thuve

    Hakon Thuve, Chief, Applications Development Branch, NATO C3 Agency

    12:00 SUPPORTING FUTURE AIR MANOEUVRE FORWARD DEPLOYMENT

    Colonel Nick Knudsen

    Colonel Nick Knudsen, Head of Logistics, Joint Helicopter Command Headquarters, MoD UK

  • The range and scale of air manoeuvre operations
  • The support requirements
  • Developing economic and resilient logistic support
  • Integrating new commercial support solutions
  • Developing joint service integrated support – the future
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 LOGISTICAL SUPPORT WITHIN FORWARD DEPLOYMENT - CASE STUDY

    Colonel Johannes Amting

    Colonel Johannes Amting, Branch Chief, Concepts and Plans, German Air Force Material Command

  • Emerging possibilities for deployment in the 21st Century
  • Changes in support requirements
  • Lessons learnt and how to benefit from them
  • Ways of implementing solutions into future operations
  • 14:40 IDENTIFYING THE CONTRACTOR’S DUTY AND RESPONSIBILITY IN FORWARD DEPLOYMENT

    Randy Lewis

    Randy Lewis, Senior Logistics Analyst for Contractors Accompanying the Force, US Army

  • Contracting as an effective force multiplier
  • Identifying the necessary attributes of a contractor
  • Establishing the areas where contractor support is essential
  • Understanding the implications of involving contractors in deployment operations
  • Examining ways to maximise contractor potential
  • Case studies and examples of contractor support of deployed operations
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 RAPID DECISIVE OPERATIONS TO ACHIEVE EFFECTIVE MEDICAL SUPPORT

    Peter Jones

    Peter Jones, Chief Executive, Medical Supplies Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Assessing capabilities and priorities
  • Material management – receipt, storage and distribution.
  • Facility management
  • Capital planning processes and portfolio management
  • 16:20 CONTRACTOR LOGISTIC SUPPORT WITHIN FORWARD-DEPLOYED OPERATIONS

    Jan Lauridsen

    Jan Lauridsen, Managing Director, DCS Group

  • The contractor as a logistical necessity in forward deployment operations
  • Supply-chain dynamics of world-wide deployment
  • Developing a responsive support infrastructure
  • Stand-by concept – free choice from the menu
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One.
    Followed by a DRINKS RECEPTION Sponsored by SAP AG

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Major General John Stokoe (Rtd) CB CBE

    Major General John Stokoe (Rtd) CB CBE, Managing Director, Amey Defence

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS CURRENT SUPPORT PROCEDURES

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Visiting Professor, Acquisition and Logistics Unit, Department of Defence Management Security Analysis, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science

  • A research-based overview of current support capabilities
  • Evolution of support procedures in response to external changes
  • Improvements and solutions
  • Discussion on policies and issues emphasised by support procedure studies
  • 9:40 BASE LOGISTIC SUPPORT TO DEPLOYED OPERATIONS

    Colonel Phil Naylor

    Colonel Phil Naylor, Director of Operations, Defence Storage and Distribution Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Base storage and distribution capabilities
  • Operational demand profiles
  • Support activities
  • Areas for development
  • 10:20 POLICIES FOR RAPID DEPLOYMENT

    Ray Schaible

    Ray Schaible, Program Director, Operational Logistics Group, Logistics Management Institute

  • Understanding the requirements for rapid deployment
  • US measurements to enhance rapid deployment capability - US infrastructure - Airlift - Sealift - Prepositioning - Contingency contracting
  • Future steps
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE LOGCAP PROGRAM

    Don Trautner

    Don Trautner, Program Manager, Logistics Civil Augmentation Program, LOGCAP, Operations Support Command, Army Material Command , US Army

  • Logistics Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP) – background and history
  • The contractor and operational planning
  • The contractor as an essential capability for future military operations
  • Case study – contractor support within a specific operation
  • LOGCAP progress
  • 12:00 CASE-STUDY - EMPLOYED CONTRACTOR SUPPORT

    Per-Olov Pettersson

    Per-Olov Pettersson, Director of Business Development ILS, Ericsson Microwave Systems

  • Peace enforcement mission - rapid deployment to fulfil the requirements
  • Establishing the support and supply chain
  • Fulfilling the promise of a contractor
  • How issues were identified and dealt with
  • Lessons learnt for the future
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 PLANNING AND SUPPORT OF DEPLOYED OPERATIONS

    Dipl. Ing. Kai Finck

    Dipl. Ing. Kai Finck, Development Manager, Defense Forces & Public Security, SAP AG

  • Commanding troops in the field requires information about resources to be highly visible and accessible
  • SAP Defense Forces & Public Security offers the ability to plan and build up operating forces that are prepared for action. The SAP solution is flexible to support changes concerning the order of battle or support relationships Moreover, it complies with a system architecture that is appropriate for military purposes. All relevant processes are integrated with administration, logistics, and controlling
  • The IT-solution helps with managing the organisational structure as well as personnel, materiel and financial resources
  • With respect to deployment and exercises it is possible to carry out the logistic and administrative core processes of an organisational element even when the connection to a central IT-system is broken
  • To ensure this processing, SAP is developing a number of functions based on SAP Mobile Engine technology
  • 14:40 MOBILE COMPUTING IN THE DEPLOYMENT AREA

  • Exploiting IT across the logistic-business space and managing the user information need
  • Logistics: certainty of information or certainty of supply
  • Logistics IS in a fractured communications environment
  • Emerging innovative hardware to be employed on the battlefield
  • Assessing communication systems’ ability to effectively handle the daily non-secure internet, teleconferencing and voice communications
  • Group Captain Ron Simpson

    Group Captain Ron Simpson, Assistant Director, Business Improvements (Information), ES (Air), Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Lieutenant Colonel Richard Wakefield

    Lieutenant Colonel Richard Wakefield, SO1 Systems, E&AM CCT, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    David Kendrick

    David Kendrick, Support Director e-Capability, BAE SYSTEMS

    15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE FUTURE OF TRAINING PROCEDURES

    Lieutenant Colonel David Adams

    Lieutenant Colonel David Adams, Head of International Defence Training (Army), International Defence Training (Army)

  • The increased co-operation between the military and the private sector
  • Contractors as a means of support to meet training requirements
  • The impact of training on international operations
  • Case studies to demonstrate successful partnerships
  • 16:20 CONTRACTORS WITHIN INTEGRATED LOGISTIC SUPPORT

    Augden W Short

    Augden W Short, Program Manager, DynCorp International… A CSC Company

  • Developing and implementing an effective support programme
  • Fulfilling the promise of a contractor
  • The capability of contractor support as an integral part of integrated logistic support
  • Key risks of deployed contractor support
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.