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Building on the success of ‘The Offset Summit’ (Washington, January 1999) and ‘Middle East Defence Procurement’ (London, February 1998), SMi have produced this highly topical and important conference to address and identify the current and future procurement issues, offset demands and joint venture opportunities in Turkey.

It will also examine the procurement processes in Turkey and explore the changing demands and capabilities of the Turkish defence industry. Case studies from a number of key Turkish industry representatives will also be presented.

As a senior executive, you will be aware of the importance and potential of this market, the fifth largest in the world. Furthermore, recent figures suggest that the Turkish defence market will be worth some $150 billion over the next 20 years.

This conference offers you the opportunity to network with key defence officials and industry experts. Benefit from the practical insight and hard advice provided by an outstanding panel of speakers. If you are involved in any aspect of defence industry business with and/or in Turkey, you cannot afford to miss this unique event.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Lale Sariibrahimoglu

Lale Sariibrahimoglu, Ankara Correspondent, Jane’s Defence Weekly

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS - THE UNDERSECRETARIAT FOR DEFENCE INDUSTRIES (SSM)

Yalçin Burçak

Yalçin Burçak, Undersecretary, SSM

  • The role of the SSM in defence procurement - how it relates to the other organisations
  • The organisational structure of the SSM - the key personnel identified
  • An analysis of the existing projects being undertaken by the SSM
  • The future for the SSM and its role in defence procurement in the 21st Century
  • 9:40 TURKISH DEFENCE INDUSTRY POLICY AND STRATEGY PRINCIPLES

    Professor Dr Hasan Kazdagli

    Professor Dr Hasan Kazdagli, President, Pamukkale University

  • An overview of the aims and objectives of the Turkish defence industry policy
  • Developing critical technology domestically - the need to reduce dependence on foreign companies and encourage domestic industry involvement
  • The move towards increased involvement in European arms consortia
  • An examination of the government’s ten - year procurement plan
  • The future of the Turkish defence sector - industry and military assessments
  • 10:20 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT - THE FUTURE OF TURKISH DEFENCE

    Dr Cemil Arikan

    Dr Cemil Arikan, Vice President, Tubitak (The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey)

  • The organisations - their structure and personnel examined
  • The aims and objectives of Turkish research and development policy
  • Key areas of development - which areas of specialisation are being undertaken?
  • The move towards digitisation - how does this affect RandD policy in Turkey?
  • Modernisation or new technologies? - What does the future hold?
  • Technology transfer discussed - the needs of Tubitak and SAGE in the 21st Century
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PROJECT REQUIREMENTS

    Mustafa Kaya

    Mustafa Kaya, Head of Projects Department, SSM

  • The need for feasible and continuous investment projects
  • Well-balanced capital formation - a closer look at the balance between domestic and foreign partners
  • Technology transfer - the existing technology, the requirements and the objectives
  • An overview of existing industrial capabilities and human resources
  • The need for quality assurance - the NATO compliant system explained
  • An examination of the importance of credit opportunities, third party sales, offsets and countertrade
  • 12:00 FOREIGN RELATIONS - DOMESTIC PROCUREMENT

    Sitki Egeli

    Sitki Egeli, Director of Foreign Affairs, SSM

  • International relations and their effect on defence industry trade
  • The existing international agreements and Memorandum of Understanding assessed
  • An analysis of the international organisations dealing with the Turkish defence sector
  • The developing markets - an examination of the principle contracting bases
  • Political and regional factors - what should the new entrant into the Turkish Market be aware of?
  • What does the future hold for Turkish defence procurement?
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 AN OVERVIEW OF TURKISH DEFENCE DEMANDS

    Metehan Demir

    Metehan Demir, Diplomatic and Defense Correspondent, Hurriyet

  • An examination of the issues which will affect Turkish defense procurement in the 21st Century
  • Political geographical factors assessed - the implications for the Armed Forces
  • Predictions for the future - what are the main objectives for Turkey’s Armed Forces in the 21st Century
  • 14:20 TURKISH POLITICS, TURKISH DEFENCE

    Umit Enginsoy

    Umit Enginsoy, Ankara Correspondent, Defense News

  • The politics of defence - how the political system affects the defence procurement mechanisms
  • Turkey in the international arena - how Turkey’s relations with the international community affect its procurement demands
  • An outline of the current military procurement programs
  • Future partners - potential national co-operation and coalition agreements assessed
  • The Turkish defence sector - some predictions for the future
  • 15:00 GREEK AND GREEK CYPRIOT REARMAMENT POLICY AND TURKISH DEFENCE REQUIREMENTS

    Dr Hasan Unal

    Dr Hasan Unal, Department of International Relations, Bilkent University

  • Greece’s rearmament policy within the context of the ‘Common Defence Doctrine’
  • Greek Cypriot rearmament policy
  • The impact of Greek and Greek Cypriot procurement policy on Turkey’s defence requirements
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 TURKISH DEFENCE PROCUREMENT FUNDING ASSESSED

    Burak Bekdil

    Burak Bekdil, Defense Analyst, Turkish Strategic Studies Group

  • Funding the procurement objectives
  • What are the sources for funding and how does political theory affect the procurement cycle in practice?
  • What are the sources of conflict in funding between various government agencies?
  • Is forming a defence industry export co-ordination office obtainable?
  • Does the local industry require a central government agency for better export performance?
  • 16:30 POLITICAL RISK AND TURKISH PROCUREMENT

    Professor Michael O’Leary

    Professor Michael O’Leary, Director, Political Risk Services

  • What political factors should be addressed in marketing and business development strategies?
  • The major political factors which can influence government spending on defence
  • What is the political risk outlook in Turkey? What are the peculiarities of the marketplace?
  • Addressing political and economic factors in military sales predictions
  • Achieving market share - how can non-indigenous companies compete with the Turkish defence industry?
  • The political and economic future for Turkey and its defence market
  • 17:00 ‘OFFSETS AND FREE TRADE?’

    Brad Botwin

    Brad Botwin, Director, Strategic Analysis Division, US Department of Commerce

  • The US Government’s policy towards offset agreements
  • Commerce’s Annual Report on the US industrial base
  • The impact of offsets on the US industrial base
  • Offsets and the US defense trade ‘surplus’
  • Bilateral and multilateral opportunities for negotiation
  • 17:30 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chair's Opening Remarks

    Edward Manukian

    Edward Manukian, President, Simplified Solutions

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

    General (Ret.) Yilmaz Küçükseyhan

    General (Ret.) Yilmaz Küçükseyhan, Deputy Secretary General for Foreign Affairs, SaSaD (Defence Industry Manufacturers Association)

    9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS - TURKISH OFFSET EXAMINED

    Mustafa Egeli

    Mustafa Egeli, Director, Offset Programs, SSM

  • How the future policy will differ from the old? - What are the aims of the new policy?
  • The future policy’s effect on existing offset agreements and its terms and conditions discussed
  • Incentives for Turkish offset agreements discussed
  • A case study of successful offset agreements to date
  • Lessons learned from other offset programmes
  • The future opportunities in offset agreements outlined
  • 10:20 TURKISH OFFSET - TURKISH INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE

    Nurdan Selcuk

    Nurdan Selcuk, Marketing Manager, ELSAN Defense and Communications

  • What does Turkish offset stand for? - What are its aims?
  • Direct and indirect offsets - what are the differences for industry?
  • Is the current Turkish offset policy effective? Where does it fail to meet its objectives?
  • Developing an effective Turkish offset policy for the 21st Century - what changes can be made?
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MULTINATIONAL JOINT VENTURES

    Huseyin Esenergul

    Huseyin Esenergul, Assistant General Manager, FMC-Nurol

  • The objectives of a joint venture - satisfying individual demands through co-operation
  • Developing the capability to design and develop new products in the domestic market - the importance of indigenous research and development
  • The partners in FMC-Nurol - what do the parties contribute?
  • Technology transfer issues addressed - the issue of licensing examined
  • The current status of the joint venture - a case study - the success of Piranha analysed
  • Some predictions for the growth of joint ventures in the Turkish defence industry
  • 12:00 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Professor Dr Ahmet Denker

    Professor Dr Ahmet Denker, General Manager, Havelsan (Aviation Electronics Industries)

  • An overview of the aims and objectives in setting up high technology indigeous companies and capabilities
  • The demand for high technology products in the domestic economy
  • Incorporating high technologies into an existing industrial company
  • The issues to be considered in bringing advanced software into the country - establishing a software development centre
  • The financial and business development advantages of high technology hardware and software production in Turkey
  • The future for Havelsan and the implications for future technology transfer of existing developments
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 DEVELOPING A LONG-TERM APPROACH TO TURKISH DEFENCE BUSINESS

    Phillip Poole

    Phillip Poole, Regional Marketing Manager, GEC Marconi

  • Selling Turkey back home - UK perceptions - Foreign Office view
  • MARCONI KOMINIKASYOU
  • A British or Turkish company?
  • Barriers to setting up a company in Turkey
  • Turkish or English management?
  • The role of agents
  • 14:20 BUSINESS IN TURKEY - THE FOREIGN PERSPECTIVE

    Major General (Ret.) Peter McVey

    Major General (Ret.) Peter McVey, Vice President, International Tank Sales, General Dynamics International

  • An overview of General Dynamics’ past and present involvement in the Turkish defense industry
  • The why and how of pursuing defense business in Turkey
  • Then was then, Now is now - the need for corporate accommodation of the changing needs of the Turkish Armed Forces
  • A two-edged sword - meeting the needs of Turkish Armed Forces while strengthening Turkish industrial and RandD capability for the future
  • An imperative - strong, flexible and capable Turkish partners in industry
  • The challenge - unrelenting quality of product: unflagging evolution of industrial base
  • 15:00 PRIVATE FINANCE INITIATIVES IN TURKEY

    Ted Jensen

    Ted Jensen, Director, Europe and Middle East Marketing, Evans and Sutherland

  • An overview of PFI success in the defence industry
  • The structure of a PFI project
  • Advantages of a PFI procurement as compared to a conventional procurement
  • The proposed Turkish Military helicopter training centre (HELSEM)
  • Current status of the HELSEM PFI project
  • The future for PFI project within the Turkish Military
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 JOINT VENTURE - THE KEY TO SUCCESS

    Orhan Erisen

    Orhan Erisen, National Executive, Turkey, General Electric Aircraft Engines

  • The objectives of a joint venture - meeting common objectives through co-operation
  • Joint ventures as a means of maximising the return for the domestic economy
  • Key elements for success
  • Technology transfer issues addressed - an overview of licensing matters
  • The current status of the joint venture - a case study
  • Some predictions for the growth of joint ventures in the Turkish defense industry
  • 16:40 STM (Defense Technologies Engineering) - A CASE STUDY OF A TURKISH COMPANY

    Dr A Haluk Nalbantoglu

    Dr A Haluk Nalbantoglu, Vice President, STM

  • Why was STM established? What were the aims and objectives of the Company?
  • Who are the shareholders of STM?
  • Development of areas of specialisation and core areas of business in Turkey
  • An overview of recently completed projects
  • Considerations on co-operation with other companies
  • The future and expectations of STM, and the Turkish Defence Industry
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Political Risk in the Turkish Defence Sector
    Workshop

    Political Risk in the Turkish Defence Sector

    Ankara Hilton
    26th April 1999
    Ankara, Turkey

    Ankara Hilton

    Tahran Caddesi No 12
    Kavaklidere
    Ankara TR 06700
    Turkey

    Ankara Hilton

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

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    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

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    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

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