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Building on the success of our second event, we are once again bringing together the international specialists within the logistics field and tackling the issues that matter. SCM 2000 offers a unique opportunity to hear from a leading international panel of speakers on the current development in supply chain management. Following the comments of last year’s speakers and delegates, SCM 2000 shall address such issues as the strategies required to take SCM into the 21st century and the importance of data management systems in the supply chain.

As a senior industry executive, you will be aware of the importance and potential of this field. We would therefore like to invite you to register now for SCM 2000, as organised by SMi conferences.

Leading industry speakers will include:

  • Jeffrey Jones, Deputy Commander, Defense Logistics Support Command, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Nancy Johnson, Director JTAV Office, US Department of Defense
  • John Stephenson, Managing Director, Multipart
  • Siem van Merrienboer, Force Structure Studies Land-Air, Operations Research Division, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory
  • David Mellor, Business Development Director, Product Support
  • Dr David Moore, Director (Acquisition), Acquisition and Logistics Unit, Department of Defence Management and Security Analysis, Cranfield University
  • Christian Lapaque, Head of Logistics Mission, Giat Industries

Please register now to guarantee your place at this important conference.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Glyn Parry

Glyn Parry, Chairman, UKCIC Logistics and Support Working Group

9:10 STRATEGY

Jeffrey Jones

Jeffrey Jones, Deputy Commander, Defense Logistics Support Command, Defense Logistics Agency

  • The 21st century logistics challenge
  • Best commercial practices and emerging technologies
  • Supply chain integration opportunities for the Warfighter
  • Industry’s future role in commodity and combat system support
  • The way ahead, how DLA’s strategic plan meets the challenge
  • 9:40 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Siem van Merrienboer

    Siem van Merrienboer, Force Structure Studies Land-Air, Operations Research Division, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory

  • What are the developments in Supply Chain Management from a viewpoint of distribution systems?
  • Demand Chain Management and Category Management
  • Basics for distribution systems within the Royal Netherlands Army present and future
  • New concepts for distribution systems within the Royal Netherlands Army
  • Examples on the structure of the supply chain for the Royal Netherlands Army
  • Demands on information technology and control concepts
  • 10:20 COMMERICAL DEMAND CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    John Stephenson

    John Stephenson, Managing Director, Multipart Defence Managed Services

  • The Ministry of Defence as a commercial customer
  • The apparent differences between military and commercial supply chains
  • Integrating the supply chain - end to end
  • Moving from supplier to service provider to supply chain partner
  • Managing information - the key to control
  • The cultural changes and benefits for both the Ministry of Defence and Commerce
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 KEYNOTE ADDRESS - SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT IN THE MINISTRY OF DEFENCE

    Brigadier Ian Rees

    Brigadier Ian Rees, Director Defence Physical Supply Chain, Ministry of Defence

  • An overview of the current tri-Service approach
  • The characteristics and components of the proposed system
  • Possible commercial involvement in the supply chain process
  • Associated issues and initiatives
  • 12:00 OUTSOURCING NON-CORE ACTIVITIES IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN

    David Mellor

    David Mellor, Business Development Director, Product Support

  • Overview of current issues surrounding outsourcing
  • The options available using cost effective logistics solutions
  • How outsourcing can result in savings to customers
  • The legislative requirements of in-house maintenance
  • How a third-party company can help
  • Skills and training requirements for personnel
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES

    Nancy Johnson

    Nancy Johnson, Director JTAV Office, US Department of Defense

  • Joint Vision 2010 and Focused Logistics
  • Stovepipes and Interoperability
  • The GCSS Strategy
  • JTAV -- The first GCSS Application
  • Merging GCSS and GCCS
  • 14:40 INTEGRATED LOGISTIC SUPPORT DEVELOPMENT

    Tony Davies

    Tony Davies, Integrated Logistic Support Manager, Babcock Defence Systems

  • The current situation within Babcock Defence Systems
  • Developing the cost effective support programme
  • Convincing the designers - Tools at your disposal
  • Initiatives in maintenance
  • Through life costs (TLC) benefits
  • Future developments for ILS in the defence industry
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE OPERATIONAL SIDE OF AN ERP AT MILITARY DEPOTS

    Jo Wildermuth

    Jo Wildermuth, Director of Consulting for Government, Western Data Systems

  • How these requirements must be reflected in the software,
  • The architecture required for legacy interfaces,
  • How to combine more than one commercial package to cover/breath and depth
  • Some lessons learned
  • 16:20 GLOBAL RESTRUCTURING

    John Whalley

    John Whalley, Chief Executive, North West Aerospace Alliance

  • The effect on manufacturers of industry consolidation
  • How the supply chain is affected.
  • The importance of communication and networking
  • How will people exchange information?
  • Changes in working practices
  • Future requirements
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Drinks Reception for Speakers and Delegates

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Brigadier Gerald Blakey

    Brigadier Gerald Blakey, Senior Defence Editor, Defence Procurement Analysis

    9:10 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (SCM) IN THE ARMED SERVICES

    Group Captain Nick Chandler

    Group Captain Nick Chandler, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation, Royal Air Force

  • Logistics analysis and research in the Defence Logistics Organisation
  • Seeking out and promoting best practice
  • Thinking ‘out of the box’
  • Critical success factors
  • Measuring performance and progress
  • Lessons learned: enablers or millstones?
  • 9:40 THE IMPACT OF E-COMMERCE ON THE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Dr Mike Southworth

    Dr Mike Southworth, General Manager, Unipart Defence Logistics, Unipart

  • The impact of change culture
  • The importance of people and technology
  • Pitfalls and pooh traps
  • Partnership issues
  • Information
  • Benefits of e-commerce as part of the supply chain
  • 10:20 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT CRITIQUE

    David Moore

    David Moore, Director (Acquisition), Acquisition and Logistics Unit, Department of Defence Management and Security Analysis, Cranfield University

  • Evolution of UK defence procurement in response to external changes
  • Circumstances which stimulated the smart procurement study
  • Review and classification of the published smart procurement policies and it’s effects on supply chain management
  • Discussion of those policies which are controvertible
  • Issues insufficiently emphasises by the smart procurement study
  • Wider implications of smart procurement polices
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 LOGISTICS DATA MANAGEMENT

    Christian Lapaque

    Christian Lapaque, Head of Logistics Mission, Giat Industries

  • Overview of current technology for electronic data management
  • The importance of e-business in supply chain management
  • Advanced LOGISTICS INFORMATION SYSTEM
  • Integrating information technology for the development of the defence industry
  • Assigning responsibility for data management
  • Product life cycle support
  • 12:00 THE ‘E-BUSINESS’ REALITY

    Tony Munton

    Tony Munton, Senior Consultant, IBM Consulting Group

  • The principles of e-procurement and SCM exploiting web technologies
  • Managing a large supplier base over the Internet
  • Managing small suppliers over the Internet
  • Integration with downstream supply chain partners
  • Data management and communications
  • Balancing cost and service quality
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT FOR SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT PROCESSES

    David Macleod

    David Macleod, Managing Director, Logistics Training International

  • Overview of training processes
  • Developing logistics potential through people
  • Implementing an effective training initiative
  • Understanding the needs of the customer fully
  • Using technology to optimise learning
  • 14:40 SUPPORT CHAIN MANAGEMENT - A USERS PERSPECTIVE

    Ian Horseman

    Ian Horseman, Consultant, Integrated Logistic Support and Supply Support Management, BMT Reliability Consultants

  • The effect on manufacturers of industry consolidation
  • How the supply chain is affected.
  • The importance of communication
  • How will people exchange information?
  • Changes in working practices
  • Future requirements
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 SOURCING AND SUPPLY CHAIN DEVELOPMENTS IN AVIATION MAINTENANCE

    Kevin Parker

    Kevin Parker, Managing Consultant, PA Consulting

  • Component support strategies - what are today's visions
  • Supply chain opportunities - (out)sourcing more than the individual parts and materials
  • Delivering the opportunities - some of the lessons learned
  • 16:20 USING THE NEW CONCEPT OF THE VALUE CURVE TO UNDERSTAND RELATIONAL POWER IN THE PROCUREMENT FUNCTION

    David Ward

    David Ward, Managing Director, The Wansbeck Consultancy

  • Ways to inprove value inprocurement; matching cultures in the buyin-supplying organisations
  • Matching power and ownership in the procurmement process
  • Integgeted operations as ways ways of improving value
  • Using e-commerce to help improve value - the internet and multimedia in bid bid and proposal work
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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