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The increasing complexity and uncertain nature of the modern threat makes international military co-operation both politically and militarily desirable. However, coalition success is much harder to achieve if systems, doctrine, and command of the individual forces are different. Militaries of allied nations must work together towards operating more effectively in the theatre and beyond by becoming increasingly interoperable.

The Joint and Coalition Interoperability conference will pay special attention to the current status of recent NATO accession nations and their ongoing programmes to achieve full interoperability with fellow alliance members. The conference will highlight the many facets of Coalition Interoperability, illustrating country specific approaches, updates on technical developments and outline technological and architectural considerations.

Delegates at SMi's Joint and Coalition Interoperability conference will benefit from meeting experts in the field and the opportunity not only hear about the obstacles they are facing but also to identify the latest solutions in which to overcome these.

A unique opportunity to hear from leading experts:

  • Richard Williams, Deputy Director, NATO International Staff, Armaments, Defence Investment Division, NATO Headquarters
  • Rostislav Kotil, Director, Defence Policy and Strategy Division, Ministry of Defence, Czech Republic
  • Colonel Mark Vincent, Assistant Director, Command Support Development Applications, Signal Officer in Chief, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Colonel Chuck Pattillo, Chief, Multinational Operations, The Joint Staff, Department of Defense, USA
  • Alexander Urrutia, Deputy Director, Joint Interoperability and Integration, Joint Forces Command, USA
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hans H Strunz, Chief Executive, Data Responsible Agency GAF CCIS / Project Manager BALTCCIS, Ministry of Defence, Germany
  • Ricardo Vellespin, Capability Manager Manoeuvre, European Defence Agency
  • Ionel Hornea, Chief, Ministry of National Defence, Republic of Romania
  • Wayne Parks, Chief, Command Systems Operations Division, US Department of Defense
  • Dr Larry Lewis, CNA Representative, Joint Center for Operational Analysis, USA
  • Dr Cyrus Azani, Senior Systems Engineer, Open Systems Joint Task Force/NGC, Department of Defense, USA
  • Brigadier General Algis Vaiceliunas, Commandant, Baltic Defence College, Estonia
  • Professor Dr Ladislav Burita, University of Defence, Czech Republic

Chaired by:

Colonel (Ret’d) Jeremy Barrett, Head, Strategic Development, The Salamander Organization

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett

Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett, Head, Strategic Development, The Salamander Organization

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Richard Williams

Richard Williams, Deputy Director, NATO International Staff Armaments, NATO HQ

10:30 Morning Coffee

11:00 INTEROPERABILITY AND THE EUROPEAN DEFENCE AGENCY

Richard  Vellespin

Richard Vellespin, Capability Manager Manoeuvre, EDA Capabilities Directorate, European Defence Agency

11:40 THE MULTINATIONAL INTEROPERABILITY COUNCIL (MIC)

Colonel Chuck Pattillo

Colonel Chuck Pattillo, Chief, Multinational Operations Division, Department of Defense, USA

  • The MIC
  • The coalition operating environment
  • Considerations
  • logistics
  • medical
  • host nation
  • media relations
  • civil-military
  • Observations from recent events
  • The way forward
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 UK ARMY PERSPECTIVE ON INFORMATION INTEROPERABILITY IN THE LAND ENVIRONMENT

    Colonel Mark Vincent

    Colonel Mark Vincent, Assistant Director Command Support, Development Applications, Signal Officer in Chief, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The information challenge
  • UK Land Environment Command and Battlespace Management Programme
  • Information Interoperability within UK LE CBM Programme
  • Multinational Interoperability
  • 14:30 DEATH BY 1000 ANT BITES

    Dr Larry  Lewis

    Dr Larry Lewis , CNA Representative, Joint Center for Operational Analysis, Department of Defense, USA

  • Interoperability challenges in recent operations:
  • Challenges in managing operations (operational challenges, interoperability challenges at the JTF headquarters level)
  • Challenges in executing operations at the tactical level
  • Parting thoughts
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 COMMAND AND CONTROL IN JOINT OPERATIONS

    Alexander Urrutia

    Alexander Urrutia, Deputy Director, Joint Battle Management Command and Control, Joint Forces Command , Department of Defense, USA

  • Highlighting the challenges to cohesive C2 capabilities
  • Defining JBMC2, scope and context
  • Update of the new approach to organising, training and equipping the force with JBMC2 capabilities
  • USJFCOM role in JBMC2 in support of DoD priorities
  • Programs, concepts, initiatives and the JBMC2 roadmap
  • 16:20 ENABELING INTEROPERABILITY THROUGH THE INTEGRATED NETWORK OF OPEN ARCHITECTURES

    Dr Cyrus Azani

    Dr Cyrus Azani, Senior Systems Engineer, Open Systems Joint Task Force/NGC, Department of Defense, USA

    17:00 COALTITION INTEROPERABILITY

  • The baseline capture process
  • Capability gap analysis
  • Technology insertion
  • Interoperability comparison
  • Capability roadmap development
  • Andrew  Park

    Andrew Park, Command & Battlespace Management, Lockheed Martin STASYS

    Dr Chris  Copland

    Dr Chris Copland , Principal Consultant, CIS Management, Lockheed Martin Stasys, Lockheed Martin STASYS

    17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett

    Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett, Head, Strategic Development, The Salamander Organization

    9:10 MULTINATIONAL INTEROPERABILITY EDUCATION

    Colonel Olle Ljung

    Colonel Olle Ljung, Deputy Commandant and Course Director, Joint Command and General Staff Course, Baltic Defence College

  • The importance of an international approach to officer education
  • Explaining and promoting NATO interoperability guidelines
  • Educating officers of future NATO members in preparation for alliance interoperability requirements
  • 9:50 THE ROMANIAN PERSPECTIVE

    Colonel Ionel Hornea

    Colonel Ionel Hornea, Chief, Office of Strategic Planning Directorate,, General Staff, Republic of Romania

  • Interoperability - the principal factor of the accession and main element of full integration of Romania into NATO
  • The approach of the interoperability concept in the transformation and modernisation process of the Romanian armed forces
  • The relation between the modernisation and acquisition to achieve the interoperability in the Romanian armed forces
  • The main fields of the interoperability achievement in the Romanian armed forces
  • The operational interoperability in the Romanian armed forces
  • Technical interoperability in the Romanian armed forces
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 INTEGRATING TECHNICAL AND NON-TECHNICAL INTEROPERABILITY FOR INFORMATION SHARING

    Dr Karen Carr

    Dr Karen Carr, Director, Enterprise Capability, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Understanding the operational value of information
  • Requirements for situational awareness
  • Coalition constraints
  • Technical and non-technical inter-dependencies
  • Evidence from experiments and exercises
  • A framework for integration
  • 11:30 BRIDGING THE GAP IN SECURE COALITION INFORMATION ECHANGE THROUGH FLEXIBLE, EFFICICIENT AND TRUSTED SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS

    Brigadier General (Ret.) Bernie  Skoch

    Brigadier General (Ret.) Bernie Skoch, Consultant, Sigaba

  • Definition/importance of secure coalition information sharing
  • Challenges facing the coalition in sharing information
  • Recent steps forward in securing coalition information exchanges
  • How to get to the next level in security by leveraging software solutions
  • Best practices in information sharing
  • 12:10 Networking Lunch

    14:00 BALTCCIS - BALTIC COMMAND & CONTROL INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans H Strunz

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans H Strunz, Chief Executive Data Responsible Agency GAF CCIS/ BALTCCIS Project Manager, Ministry of Defence, Germany

  • The problem of interoperability
  • Connecting incoherent systems
  • To handle the uncertainty of future coalition structure and information requirements
  • BALTCCIS - a story of success
  • The generic prototype for a future flexible CCIS
  • 14:30 NATO RESPONSE FORCES (NRF) – C2 INTEROPERABILITY

    Bert Tiems

    Bert Tiems, Chief, Land Systems and Interoperability, Operations Research Division, NATO Consultation, Command and Control Agency (NC3A)

  • Introduction to NRF concept
  • NRF C2 Interoperability requirements and challenges
  • Legacy and emerging C2 interoperability mechanism
  • Assessment of C2 interoperability status of current and planned NRF rotations
  • Summary and conclusions
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NATO C3 INTEROPERABILITY THEMES

    Dr Ladislav Burita

    Dr Ladislav Burita, Professor , University Of Defense, Czech Republic

  • NATO C3 architecture approach
  • The metadata repository for data administration and integration
  • Cross-sectional information system
  • 17:00 MESSAGING INTEROPERABILITY FOR COALITION FORCES

    Tim Freestone

    Tim Freestone, Technical Architect , Nexor

  • The approach for interoperability between different trust environments
  • Protecting the domain
  • Use of chat in a coalition environment
  • Crossing the strategic and tactical divide
  • 17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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