Home
overview
This is SMi’s Second Annual Dismounted Close Combat Conference. It will analyse the changing role of the dismounted soldier, as combat operations have become increasingly lower intensity and smaller scale. It will focus on future dismounted soldier requirements in terms of technology capability requirements and mission effectiveness in light of the new and emerging threats to the 21st century dismounted soldier. Dismounted Close Combat will look at how to enable the dismounted soldier to be more lethal, better protected and better camouflaged in a combat scenario. It will also look at how the 21st century Infantrymen will fit into the battlefield digitalisation process as a whole. This conference will give case studies on country specific soldier modernisation programmes. It will also analyse individual country soldier requirements, the status of the individual programmes in terms of technology achieved, timescales met and the future vision for the dismounted soldier.

Gain an insight from key industry speakers in the field:
Lieutenant Colonel Jim Storr, SO1 Doctrine, DGD&D, Ministry of Defence, UK


Lieutenant Colonel Tai Theron, Project Officer, Project African Warrior, SANDF
Wing Commander Chris Abbott, Director of Joint Warfare, Nuclear Biological Chemical 2, Ministry of Defence, UK
George Mordica II, Senior Military Analyst, Center for Army Lessons Learned
Major Johan Benson, OC, HQ/Log Coy, Royal Guards, Swedish Armed Forces
Captain Johan Ström, Instructor, TTP Department, Swedish Army Combat School
Bob Barbier, Deputy Programme Manager, Small Unit Operations, TNO Defence Research
Tim Young, Business Group Manager, Vehicle Sub-Systems & Robotics, QinetiQ, Future Systems Technology
Christina Patterson, Research Staff Member, Institute for Defense Analyses

Benefits of Attending:
IDENTIFY key technologies for soldier modernisation
ASSESS dismounted close combat requirements for the 21st century
UNDERSTAND the importance of simulation and training
DISCOVER the latest developments for the dismounted soldier
MAXIMISE networking opportunities in a globally attended forum

"The conference was very beneficial and informative"
Major Thomas S Bowers, Equipment Requirements Division, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, United States Marine Corps

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Nicholas Stanbridge

Dr Nicholas Stanbridge, Dismounted Studies Team, Dstl Land Systems

Dr Nicholas Stanbridge

Dr Nicholas Stanbridge, Dismounted Studies Team, Dstl Land Systems

9:10 URBAN OPERATIONS: LESSONS LEARNED

  • Urban operations at the combat training centers
  • Actual urban operations - JUST CAUSE, Mogadishu, Grozny, Jenin and ENDURING FREEDOM
  • Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTP) and their importance for future tactical operations
  • CALLs’ collection techniques and methodology for TTP development
  • CALLs’ mission to disseminate TTP and lessons to the US Army
  • George Mordica II

    George Mordica II, Senior Military Analyst, Center for Army Lessons Learned

    George Mordica II

    George Mordica II, Senior Military Analyst, Center for Army Lessons Learned

    9:40 EXERCISE SEA WALL

  • Revision of infantry company structures and tactics
  • Infiltration as a fundamental approach
  • Results of force-on-force field trials at company level
  • Implications for tactics and trials methodologies
  • Lieutenant Colonel Jim Storr

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Storr, SO1 Doctrine, DGD&D, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Storr

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Storr, SO1 Doctrine, DGD&D, Ministry of Defence, UK

    10:20 HOW TO ADDRESS THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE DISMOUNTED SOLDIER THROUGH A PHASED APPROACH

  • Project African Warrior - background
  • The requirements of the South African dismounted soldier
  • Project African Warrior challenges
  • Project African Warrior phased approach
  • Lieutenant Colonel Tai Theron

    Lieutenant Colonel Tai Theron, Project Officer, Project African Warrior, SANDF

    Nico Ras

    Nico Ras, Programme Manager, Project Warrior, ARMSCOR

    Lieutenant Colonel Tai Theron

    Lieutenant Colonel Tai Theron, Project Officer, Project African Warrior, SANDF

    Nico Ras

    Nico Ras, Programme Manager, Project Warrior, ARMSCOR

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 EQUIPPING THE US SOLDIER

    Ross Guckert

    Ross Guckert, Director of Systems Integration, Program Executive Office for Soldier, US Army

    12:00 THE INCUBATOR PROCESS

  • Overview
  • Role of modeling and simulation
  • Subject matter expert workshops
  • Implementation experience
  • Lessons learned
  • Christina M. Patterson

    Christina M. Patterson, Research Staff Member, Institute for Defense Analyses

    Christina M. Patterson

    Christina M. Patterson, Research Staff Member, Institute for Defense Analyses

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 URBAN OPERATIONS TACTICS AND TECHONOLOGIES

    Alon Guttel

    Alon Guttel, Deputy Vice President for Research and Development, Israel Military Industry

  • The threat and how it is likely to develop
  • The tactics and technologies that apply to urban warfare
  • Minimising civilian casualties, collateral damage and fratricide
  • The use of less than lethal weapons and munitions
  • Enhancing lethality and survivability
  • What technologies are needed for the future “soldier weapon system”
  • 14:40 NUCLEAR, CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

  • Evaluate present and projected chemical and biological warfare threats in the dismounted battlefield
  • Current state of technologies, tactics and procedures for the dismounted soldier
  • Potential operational interactions
  • Ensuring operationally effective capabilities
  • Wing Commander Chris Abbott

    Wing Commander Chris Abbott, Director of Joint Warfare, Nuclear Biological Chemical 2, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Wing Commander Chris Abbott

    Wing Commander Chris Abbott, Director of Joint Warfare, Nuclear Biological Chemical 2, Ministry of Defence, UK

    15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 SIMULATING CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT FOR THE DISMOUNTED SOLDIER

  • The effects of chemical, biological and radiological weapons on modern battlefields must be considered in the development of operational and contingency plans
  • Effects of Chemical, Biological and Radiological weapons on non combatants
  • Assessment of the civilian population for urban warfare and peace keeping and peace making operations
  • Emerging simulation technologies
  • Providing commanders and their staffs with tools that facilitate far more detailed and realistic assessments of friendly and enemy courses of action
  • Identifying the pacing technologies necessary to achieving success
  • C Russell Stout

    C Russell Stout, Vice President, Region Manager, OptiMetrics

    C Russell Stout

    C Russell Stout, Vice President, Region Manager, OptiMetrics

    16:20 SIMULATION TECHNOLOGY FOR CLOSE COMBAT TRAINING

  • MOUT and dismounted close combat - Training requirements MOUT - Possible intersections of MOUT and DCC - Operational equipment - Personal skills, teamwork and leadership
  • MOUT training equipment - From CTC to close combat training - Central and distributed intelligence concept - Weapon simulation requirements - Effect simulation requirements - Exercise control and after action review in urban terrain exercises - Data flow aspects
  • Conclusions for dismounted close combat - Synergy for dismounted close combat - Future steps
  • Ernst Christians

    Ernst Christians, Director Sales & Marketing, C.O.E.L

    Ernst Christians

    Ernst Christians, Director Sales & Marketing, C.O.E.L

    17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Francis Tusa

    Francis Tusa, Editor, Defence Analysis

    Francis Tusa

    Francis Tusa, Editor, Defence Analysis

    9:10 THE SWEDISH URBAN RIFLE BATTALION APPROACH TO DISMOUNTED CLOSE COMBAT

  • The Urban Rifle Battalion
  • Training of the conscripts
  • Techniques used by the squad/platoon when fighting in built up areas
  • Future requirements
  • Captain Håkan Jönsson

    Captain Håkan Jönsson, Platoon leader and FIBUA Instructor, Royal Lifeguards, Swedish Armed Forces

    Captain Håkan Jönsson

    Captain Håkan Jönsson, Platoon leader and FIBUA Instructor, Royal Lifeguards, Swedish Armed Forces

    9:40 DEVELOPING DISMOUNTED CLOSE COMBAT TACTICS

  • Development on tactics, techniques and procedures for military operations in urbanised terrain
  • How to verify techniques, methods and equipment
  • How to win the fight: making tacticians of soldiers
  • The future Swedish dismounted soldier: Markus
  • Captain Johan Ström

    Captain Johan Ström, Instructor, TTP Department, Swedish Army Combat School

    Captain Johan Ström

    Captain Johan Ström, Instructor, TTP Department, Swedish Army Combat School

    10:20 NETHERLANDS SOLDIER MODERNISATION

  • The changing role of the soldier
  • Identifying operational needs
  • Modelling small unit operations
  • Analysis of new technology
  • Bob Barbier

    Bob Barbier, Deputy Programme Manager, Small Unit Operations, TNO Defence Research

    Bob Barbier

    Bob Barbier, Deputy Programme Manager, Small Unit Operations, TNO Defence Research

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ORGANISING INFANTRY

  • The fire team
  • The section
  • The close combat company
  • Target finders and snipers
  • Re-organisation
  • William Owen

    William Owen, Military Science Editor, Defence Analysis

    William Owen

    William Owen, Military Science Editor, Defence Analysis

    12:00 BATTLEFIELD ROBOTICS: FRIEND OR FOE?

  • Problems associated with close combat
  • US DoD and UK MoD activity
  • Close combat robotic missions and requirements
  • Semi autonomous or full autonomy
  • "State of the art" vs "state of the practical"
  • Conclusions
  • Tim Young

    Tim Young, Business Group Manager, Vehicle Sub-Systems & Robotics, QinetiQ, Future Systems Technology

    Tim Young

    Tim Young, Business Group Manager, Vehicle Sub-Systems & Robotics, QinetiQ, Future Systems Technology

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 LATEST ADVANCES FOR THE DISMOUNTED SOLDIER

  • Thales involvement in soldier modernisation programmes
  • Advanced voice and data communications: electronic benefits for all areas of dismounted combat
  • The soldier systems provides a seamless link to the army assets: robots, vehicles
  • Utilising commercial technologies to effectively meet harsh operational requirements
  • Tim Hooper

    Tim Hooper, Business Development Manager, Thales Communications

    Tim Hooper

    Tim Hooper, Business Development Manager, Thales Communications

    14:40 TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE DISMOUNTED COMBAT SOLDIER CAPABILITY

  • Image intensifiers - "our old friend"
  • Thermal imagers for dismounted infantry
  • Image fusion approaches
  • Developing solutions - "best of the best" vs "does the job"
  • Steve Rickard

    Steve Rickard, Business Development Manager - Infantry Business Group, Thales Optics

    Steve Rickard

    Steve Rickard, Business Development Manager - Infantry Business Group, Thales Optics

    15:20 DISMOUNTED RSI

    Derrick Van Wyk

    Derrick Van Wyk, Manager, CSIR Defencetek

  • An overview of RSI within dismounted combat
  • The key role and need for RSI
  • Operational challenges
  • The future of RSI within these operations
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea
    Close Of Conference

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.