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Air power’s ability to contribute to the joint battle has increased. Not only can modern air power arrive quickly where needed, it has become far more lethal in conventional operations. Equipped with advanced munitions, either in service or about to become operational, and directed by modern C3I systems, air power has the potential to destroy enemy ground forces either on the move or in defensive positions at a high rate while concurrently destroying vital elements of the enemy’s war fighting infrastructure. In short, the mobility, lethality, and survivability of air power makes it well suited to the needs of rapidly developing regional conflicts.

This conference will address the major issues within the evolving battlespace, looking at the future requirements and government policies for Airborne Strike. The recent advances in platform design, in particular, the emphasis on future concepts and supportability will be a key area of evaluation at the conference. Furthermore, it is evident that the decreasing funding of national defence budgets has had a major impact on the development of precision weaponry, forcing a drive towards procurement of ‘the most capable’ ‘for the least cost’. System technology is also a key factor in the fullest possible exploitation of the precision weapon capability and revolutions in targeting, sensor and radar technology. This will undoubtedly continue to shape the future evolution of the precision guided munition and therefore, this conference will give a valuable insight into these emerging capabilities.

A unique opportunity to hear international case studies and expert perspectives from leaders in the field including:
Major General Felix Dupré, Commander, Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center
Group Captain Robert McAlpine, Station Commander, RAF Marham*
Colonel Terence Szanto, System Program Director, Air and Space Operations Center, United States Air Force Electronic Systems Center
Colonel Rudy Rudolph, Director of Operations, Air Force Command & Control Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Center (AFC2ISRC)
Colonel Jarmo Lindberg, Assistant Chief of Staff, Operations Division, Finnish Defence Staff
Lieutenant Colonel Robert Daugherty, Director, JSF Operations, United States Air Force
Major Bill Rones, Chief, F-15E Strike Eagle Team, United States Air Force
Major John Brennan, Director, Aerospace Studies Simulation Lab, Canadian Forces School of Aerospace Studies
Carol Frazier, Project Manager, Aviation Rockets and Missiles Project Office, US Department of the Army
Colonel Mark Neice, Chief, Laser Division, Air Force Research Laboratory
Lieutenant Colonel John Oxford, Product Manager, Submunitions, Precision fires, Rockets and Missile systems Program Executive Office, US Department of the Army

* Subject to Final Confirmation

Benefits of Attending:
ANALYSE the role of airborne strike in the modern battlespace
IDENTIFY operational requirements for future strike capability
EXPAND your knowledge of current and future platforms, weapon systems and equipment
DISCOVER methods and capabilities for modelling, simulation and testing
INCREASE your awareness of emerging technologies and their impact on future airborne strike

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes, Aerospace Analyst, International Institute for Strategic Studies

9:10 AIR POWER AND THE MODERN BATTLESPACE

Major General Felix Dupré

Major General Felix Dupré, Commander, Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center

  • The strategic and tactical concept
  • Enhanced capacity - firepower - flexibility - speed - reach - ubiquity
  • Task/Mission distribution
  • Non-combat uses
  • The future
  • 9:40 AIRBORNE STRIKE IN PRACTICE

    Group Captain Robert McAlpine

    Group Captain Robert McAlpine, Station Commander, RAF Marham

  • The centrality of intelligence in Operation Iraqi Freedom and predictive battlefield awareness
  • How this strategic assessment of the enemy affected military operations
  • Iraq as a conceptual and organisational transformation
  • Seamless integration – air power as part of joint structures and operating concepts
  • The humanitarian aspect - avoiding widespread collateral damage and the post-conflict contribution
  • The long-term impact of Op Iraqi Freedom on military and airborne operations
  • 10:20 AIR AND SPACE OPERATIONS CENTER

    Colonel Terence Szanto

    Colonel Terence Szanto, System Program Director, Air and Space Operations Center, United States Air Force Electronic Systems Center

  • Coalition Command and Control - overview of AOC Operations - information Management - infrastructure
  • Interoperability Issues between U.S. and partners - policy & Technology Issues
  • Way ahead - staffing of new policies - key technologies - examples of current initiatives - ideas on processes for finding areas for interoperability
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER

    Speaker to be confirmed

    Speaker to be confirmed, ,

  • Stealth strike fighters for the next generation
  • Performance, lethality, survivability, supportability
  • Affordability
  • Using matured/demonstrated technology
  • Interoperability and commonality
  • Foreign industry involvement
    Progress and the way ahead
  • 12:00 FINNISH FIGHTER OPERATIONS

    Colonel Jarmo Lindberg

    Colonel Jarmo Lindberg, Assistant Chief of Staff, Operations Division, Finnish Defence Staff

  • Finnish Fighter CONOPS
  • Dispersed employment - centralized command
  • Finnish Fighter Link in operational use
  • Network-centric approach to Command and Control
  • Fighter Pilot Training
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 STRIKE EAGLE

    Major Bill Rones

    Major Bill Rones, Chief, F-15E Strike Eagle Team, United States Air Force

  • A tactical fighter with an expanding role
  • Superior potential in ground attack role
  • Missions - strategic (deep) strike - interdiction - OCA - DCA
  • Enhancements to tactical capabilities
  • Weaponry
  • Challenges
    Progress
  • 14:40 MODELLING AND SIMULATION TO ENHANCE EDUCATION, TRAINING AND OPERATIONS

    Major John Brennan

    Major John Brennan, Director, Aerospace Studies Simulation Laboratory, Canadian Forces School of Aerospace Studies

  • M and S techniques
  • The move towards integrating M and S into all defence processes as viewed from a system life cycle
  • How M and S technology can enhance learning, planning and distributed mission training
  • How this use of M and S equates to enhanced strike capability
  • Verification and Validation of Models and Simulations
  • Affordability versus cost effectiveness
  • 15:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks, followed by Afternoon Tea.
    Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Colonel (Ret’d) John Goodsir CBE

    Colonel (Ret’d) John Goodsir CBE, Defence Consultant, Training Systems Technology

    9:10 OVERVIEW OF HELLFIRE AND ADVANCE PRECISION KILL WEAPON SYSTEM

    Carol Frazier

    Carol Frazier, Project Manager, Aviation Rockets and Missiles Project Office, US Department of the Army

  • Advantages of precision weapons on the battlefield
  • Operational employment
  • Operational experiences
  • Possible future employments concepts
  • 9:40 LASER TECHNOLOGY IN AIRBORNE STRIKE

    Colonel Mark Neice

    Colonel Mark Neice, Chief, Laser Division, Air Force Research Lab

  • Operational mandate
  • Mission scope
  • Targeting – stationary and moving ground targets
    Platforms
  • Surveillance and acquisition sensors
    Lethal and non-lethal engagement
  • Progress
  • The future
  • 10:20 ARMY HUNTER-KILLER

    Lieutenant Colonel John Oxford

    Lieutenant Colonel John Oxford, Product Manager, Submunitions, Precision Fires, Rockets and Missile Systems Program Executive Office – Tactical Missiles, US Department of the Army

  • Overview of Eagle Eyes and Viper Strike airborne submunitions
  • Videos of three highly successful demonstrations
  • Lessons learned from “Iraqi Freedom”
  • Multiple platform applications
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 DEVELOPMENTS IN AIR TO SURFACE WEAPONS

    Ed Whalen

    Ed Whalen, Deputy Director, Product Development, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control

  • Networked Weapons
  • Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile and Spirals (JASSM)
  • Loitering lethal and non-lethal munitions
  • Improved penetrator weapons
  • Future weapons systems concepts
  • 12:00 SEEKERS FOR FUTURE AIR-TO-SURFACE REQUIREMENTS

    Dr Adrian Britton

    Dr Adrian Britton, Millimetre Wave Radar Technical Manager, Radar Imaging Systems BG, Advanced Processing Centre, Sensors and Electronics, QinetiQ

  • Requirements
  • Inclusion within NEC
  • Design issues and performance trades
  • Recent seeker developments and concepts
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 OPEN SYSTEMS – SIMPLIFYING WEAPONS INTEGRATION

    Keith Rigby

    Keith Rigby, Head of Weapons Control and Integration, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Systems integration today
  • Open systems
  • Modular applications
  • Easing the upgrade programme
  • Conclusions
  • 14:40 SENSOR FUZED WEAPON

    Tom Harrington

    Tom Harrington, Vice President, Air Launched Weapons, Textron Systems

  • Overview
  • Operational employment
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom experience
  • 15:20 MISSILE, MUNITION AND PROJECTILE FUTURE GUIDANCE AND NAVIGATION SYSTEMS

    John Mesier

    John Mesier, Director, Missiles and Munitions Programs, Honeywell International

  • Precision-guided munitions and projectiles as discriminators in the field
  • Guidance technology developments
  • Current solutions - tactical grade inertial measurement devices - GPS - air data - altimeters
  • Future solutions -micro-electromechanical (MEMS)-based inertial measurement devices integrated with: - GPS receiver - anti-jam capability - communications links
  • Honeywell’s vision for future integated guidance and control capabilities
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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