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The current global military climate and trend towards lower intensity, smaller-scale conflict has led to an increase in the importance of the dismounted soldier. SMi’s 4th Annual Future Soldier event will review developments within international soldier modernisation programmes including Land Warrior, FIST, MARKUS, BEST and NORMANS.

The enhancements to the five NATO specified soldier domains of lethality, survivability, C4I, mobility and sustainability will each be addressed, demonstrating their success on the battlefield and how they are being further improved and advanced.

This conference will look at the developing links within the international soldier modernisation community, assessing common standards and addressing interoperability issues. Future Soldier will also incorporate country specific case studies looking at situational awareness, human factors and will focus on the most recent developments in this field.

Future Soldier 2005 will be an ideal forum to discuss how best to provide our soldiers with key technology to enhance mobility, survivability and mission success.

A unique opportunity to learn from leading military and research experts including:

  • Michael Tryon, Deputy TRADOC System Manager, Land Warrior, US Army Infantry Center
  • Colonel Silas Suchanek, IPT Leader, Defence Clothing IPT, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Colonel Lloyd McDaniels, Project Manager, Close Combat Weapon Systems Project Office (Javelin, TOW and LOSAT Programs), US Army
  • Colonel Per-Eric Gustavsson, Chairman, MARKUS Project, Swedish Armed Forces
  • Lieutenant Colonel Charles Dean, US Army Liaison, The Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies
  • Major Steve Mannings, SO2c, Individual Close Combat Systems, DEC GM, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Major Jan Coupe, Program Leader, BEST, Belgian Army
  • Major Martin Dankert, Project Officer, IdZ, German Army
  • Lee-Ann Barkhouse, Head, Operations Cell, Future Force Warrior Busines Management Team, RDECOM, Natick Soldier Center
  • Dr Lee Hively, Senior Research Staff, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Johan Braanen, Scientist, Lead C4I Developer, NORMANS, FFI, Norway
  • Emma Sparks, Land Systems, Dstl

Benefits of Attending Future Soldier:

  • EVALUATE country perspectives, focussing on current military doctrine and individual solder modernisation programmes including the Land Warrior, FIST and MARKUS
  • ASSESS the key soldier capability requirements
  • DISCUSS the enhancements to the five NATO specified soldier domains of lethality, survivability, C4I, mobility and sustainability
  • EXPLORE issues surrounding situational awareness and human factors in regards to implementation of soldier technologies.
  • NETWORK with the key military, academic and commercial representatives within the field of Land Warrior, FIST, MARKUS, BEST and NORMANS

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

William Owen

William Owen, Military Science Editor & Military Thinker, Defence Analysis

9:10 SOLDIER AS A SYSTEM

Michael Tryon

Michael Tryon, Deputy TRADOC Systems Manager-Soldier, US Army Infantry Center

  • US Army’s Core Soldier Program
  • US Army’s Land Warrior Program
  • US Army’s Mounted Warrior Program
  • US Army’s Air Warrior Program
  • Improving the combat effectiveness of the soldier
  • The soldier as a weapons platform
  • 9:50 THE FIST PROGRAMME

    Major Steve Mannings

    Major Steve Mannings, SO2c, Individual Close Combat Systems, DEC Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Introduction to the aims and objectives of the FIST programme
  • Implications of FIST for the dismounted close combat soldier
  • Review of the programme stages
  • Lessons learned from recent missions
  • Forward planning, what does the future hold for the soldier system?
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 A EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVE ON FUTURE SOLDIER PLANS

    Colonel Per-Eric Gustavsson

    Colonel Per-Eric Gustavsson, Chairman, MARKUS Project, Swedish Armed Forces

  • Analysing the capability requirements for the soldier in Sweden
  • The budget and timescale of present programmes
  • The MARKUS programme
  • Approach to the protection and information superiority of soldiers
  • Application of changes and results from test trials
  • Implementing tests for the future and the aims and objectives
  • 11:40 BELGIAN SOLDIER MODERNISATION

    Major Jan Coupe

    Major Jan Coupe, Program Leader, BEST, Belgian Army

  • Acquisition of new technologies and incorporation into the Belgian Army
  • Forward planning initiatives
  • Studies involving human performance, doctrine and operational techniques
  • Policy implications for training within the Belgian Army
  • Forthcoming studies and requirements to be addressed
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 GERMAN IdZ PROGRAMME

    Major Martin Dankert

    Major Martin Dankert, Project Officer, IdZ, German Army

  • Technological capability requirements for the German Army
  • German IdZ Programme, status quo
  • Trials and subsequent results on the IdZ
  • Lessons learned from previous missions and incorporation of findings into the German Army
  • The further way ahead
  • 14:30 THE ROLE OF C4I FOR THE INFANTRYMAN

    Johan Braanen

    Johan Braanen, Scientist, Lead C4I Developer, NORMANS, FFI, Norway

  • Developments within the NORMANS programme
  • Results from the Norwegian winter exercise Battle Griffin 2005
  • Connecting peripherals to the soldier data bus
  • Multimedia in the soldier network
  • The future of C4I in Norway
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE SOLDIER MODERNISATION RESEARCH PROGRAMME

    Emma Sparks

    Emma Sparks, Land Development, Dstl, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Enhancing the capability of the dismounted close combat soldier within the 2020 timeframe
  • The application of systems tools and techniques to define future soldier system needs
  • How to deal with complex integration and interface issues
  • An example of work to date
  • Future plans
  • 16:20 ENHANCING SOLDIER CAPABILITY WITH COMMUNICATIONS

    Tony Reed

    Tony Reed, Director, Government and Defence, Stratos

  • Communication of information to improve tactical and situational awareness
  • Reducing friendly fire incidents 'blue on blue'
  • Command and control of forward deployed units
  • Importance of welfare communications with the modern soldier
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    William Owen

    William Owen, Military Science Editor & Military Thinker, Defence Analysis

    9:10 THE JAVELIN PROGRAM

    Colonel Lloyd McDaniels

    Colonel Lloyd McDaniels, Project Manager, Close Combat Weapon Systems Project Office (Javelin, TOW and LOSAT Programs), US Army

  • Javelin’s performance in OIF/OEF
  • Establishing what future capabilities will be required through an assessment of current operations
  • An overview of the current Javelin modernisation projects
  • Use of Javelin with future combat systems
  • The way forward for Javelin
  • 9:50 NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Lieutenant Colonel Charles Dean

    Lieutenant Colonel Charles Dean, US Army Liaison, The Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies

  • Forward thinking to use nanotechnologies to enhance soldier protection
  • Hands on collection of current combat data to best understand the realities of soldiering
  • The Modern Warrior’s Combat Load – study of dismounted combat loads in Afghanistan
  • The Modern Aviator’s Combat Load – study of aviation combat loads in Iraq and Afghanistan
  • Findings of the studies forthcoming plans for implementation of initaitives
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 CASE STUDY: FOREWARNING OF BIOMEDICAL EVENTS

    Dr Lee Hively

    Dr Lee Hively, Senior Research Staff, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  • Overview of the aims of the work
  • Handling multiple streams of data
  • Graphical user interface and the execution of robust software
  • Integration into field use
  • Forward looking initiatives
  • 11:40 THE FUTURE FORCE WARRIOR ATD PROGRAM

    Cynthia Blackwell

    Cynthia Blackwell, Human Performance/MANPRINT/SSI Lead, Future Force Warrior Technology Program Office, RDECOM, Natick Soldier Center

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 MOBILITY FACTORS FOR THE DISMOUNTED INFANTRYMAN

    Colonel Silas Suchanek

    Colonel Silas Suchanek, IPT Leader, Defence Clothing IPT, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The present situation and subsequent capability requirements
  • Test trial results involving clothing of the future and its integration into the armed forces
  • Lessons learned from recent operations and forthcoming technological advancements
  • Future proposals for lighter clothing
  • 14:30 IMPROVING SOLDIER VISION

    Randy Milbert

    Randy Milbert, President, Soldier Vision

  • Current limitations and capability requirements
  • The incorporation of combat ID equipment to reduce friendly fire incidents
  • Linking the infantryman with supporting forces
  • Safely routing soldiers around combat obstacles
  • 15:10 CLOSE COMBAT CRITICAL EQUIPMENTS

    Christian Hawthorne

    Christian Hawthorne, International Marketing Manager, Insight Technology

  • Assessing the fine line between technology advancement in soldier systems and what the soldier can cope with in combat at the critical time
  • Tendency to spend less time on human factors issues then on fielding the new technology
  • The influences of military science, fashion, government/corporate, asymmetrical warfare, and user requirements on technology development
  • Critical equipment such as targeting devices must enhance, not inhibit performance at highly stressed times
  • The importance of human/equipment interface considerations when choosing advanced technology solutions
  • Operating at maximum efficiency at the critical time
  • 15:50 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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