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Next Generation Soldier Technology 2006 will be an ideal forum to review updates on international soldier modernisation programmes and to discuss how best to provide our soldiers with key technology to enhance mobility, survivability and mission success. The current global military climate and trend towards lower intensity, smaller-scale conflict has led to an increase in the importance of the dismounted soldier. The range of tasks that the infantry are expected to perform is constantly growing and, subsequently to meet this multitude of often differing requirements, a new approach to the design and procurement of soldiers’ equipment has been adopted and must continue to evolve.

There will always be a need for troops to physically occupy the ground and to engage the enemy in close combat. The 5th event in our Future Soldier series, Next Generation Soldier Technology 2006, will provide an up-to-date review of soldier systems and technologies available. It will discuss the development of off-the-shelf purchases of next generation soldier systems, examining the current, as well as the future, capability of the dismounted soldier. This conference will look at the developing links within the international soldier modernisation community, incorporating country-specific case studies, key lessons learned and forthcoming plans.

The exceptional speaker line-up includes…

  • Colonel Per-Eric Gustavsson, Chairman, MARKUS Project, Swedish Armed Forces
  • Colonel Michael Russo, Chair, Cognitive Performance, Judgement, Decision-Making Research Program, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command - Military Operational Medicine Directorate, Aeromedical Research Laboratory, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Craig Oakley, Project Director, LAND 125 - Soldier Combat System, Soldier Support Systems Program Office, Land Combat Systems Branch, Land Systems Division, Defence Materiel Organisation, Australia
  • Major Howard Newson, SO2c FIST and Individual Systems – DEC GM, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Commandant Eric Michiels, Directorate General Material Resources, Communication and Information Systems Division, Operations C3 Systems and Deployable Systems Section, Belgian Army
  • Colonel (Ret) Vince Goulding, Director, Sea Viking Division, US Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory
  • Dr Steven Savage, Deputy Research Director, Department of Functional Materials, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI)
  • Frank Simonis, Director of Future Technology Centre, TNO Netherlands
  • Tim Young, Head of Unmanned Land Systems, QinetiQ
  • Philippe van Nedervelde, Executive Director, Foresight Nanotech Institute

SMi’s Next Generation Soldier Technology conference will…

  • DISCUSS international soldier modernisation programme requirements and future objectives
  • REVIEW the latest innovations in technology that are enhancing soldier capability
    EXAMINE soldier modernisation developments facilitated through R&D and new technology
  • ANALYSE system integration, interoperability and application issues and challenges
  • EXPLORE the use of nanotechnology for the next generation soldier

*Subject to final confirmation

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Danny Crossman

Danny Crossman, Director, Strategic Business Development, Med-Eng Systems

9:10 PROJECT LAND 125

  • LAND 125 Soldier Modernisation Program – overview
  • Evolutionary enhancement
  • Technology and TTPs
  • User critical in development and evaluation
  • Warrant Officer Class 2 Brett Raymond  Corney

    Warrant Officer Class 2 Brett Raymond Corney , Trials Warrant Officer, Project Land 125, Australian Defence Material Organisation

    Major Robin Glyndwr Davies

    Major Robin Glyndwr Davies, Project Leader, Trials, Project Land 125 , Australian Defence Material Organisation

    9:50 UK MOD’S VISION FOR ITS FUTURE SOLDIER SYSTEM

    Howard Newson

    Howard Newson, SO2c FIST and Individual Systems – DEC GM, DCC IPT

  • Update on Future Integrated Soldier Technology (FIST) and Personal Equipment and Common Operational Clothing (PECOC) programmes
  • Future Dismounted Close Combat programmes
  • Linking to the network
  • UK Next Generation Small Arms programme
  • Integration
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE MARKUS PROGRAMME

    Per-Eric Gustavsson

    Per-Eric Gustavsson, Chairman, MARKUS Project, Swedish Armed Forces

  • A European perspective on future soldier plans
  • Analysing the capability requirements for the soldier in Sweden
  • The budget and timescale of present programmes
  • The MARKUS programme
  • Approach to the protection and information superiority of soldiers
  • Application of changes and results from test trials
  • Implementing tests for the future and the aims and objectives
  • 11:40 BELGIAN SOLDIER TRANSFORMATION FROM AN ARMY-C4I PERSPECTIVE

    Eric Michiels

    Eric Michiels , Directorate General Material Resources, Communication and Information Systems Division, Operations C3 Systems and Deployable Systems Section, Belgian Army

  • Scope of the BEST programme
  • NEC in the Belgian Army (focus on the C4I chain at tactical level)
  • BEST functionalities / equipment architecture
  • BEST choices and challenges
  • Radio communication (including frequency management)
  • SA and BFT
  • Vehicle integration
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE, JUDGEMENT, DECISION-MAKING IN NEXT GENERATION WARRIORS

    Michael Russo

    Michael Russo, Chair, Cognitive Performance, Judgement, Decision-Making Research Program, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command - Military Operational Medicine Directorate, Aeromedical Research Laboratory, US Army

  • Review recent research by US Army Medical Research Command with regard to prevention of catastrophic failure, injury, and death by identifying and mitigating impairments in cognitive processing
  • Discuss the quantification of the cognitive effects of operational biomedical stressors, and how judgement and decision-making are being studied
  • 14:30 PRIMORDIAL SOLDIER

    Randy Milbert

    Randy Milbert, President, Primordial

  • Ground guidance: routing soldiers around combat obstacles
  • Unit detection: differentiating friend from foe in a helmet-mounted display
  • Target hand-off: enabling soldiers to quickly request fire support
  • United States Army funding: supporting the development of a geographically-enabled augmented reality system for dismounted soldiers
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NEW DEVELOPMENT IN BALLISTIC VISOR APPLICATION

    Pierre  Vallée PEng

    Pierre Vallée PEng, Vice President Engineering and Manufacturing, Revision Eyewear Inc

  • Requirements review
  • Human factor design consideration
  • System integration
  • Ballistic characteristics
  • Optical characteristics
  • End-user validation
  • 16:20 RAPID DEVELOPMENT FOR OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM

    Danny Crossman

    Danny Crossman, Director, Strategic Business Development, Med-Eng Systems

  • Rapid development of infantry protection
  • Transforming urgent operational needs into the proven solutions
  • Integrated armor versus armor components
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Randy Milbert

    Randy Milbert, President, Primordial

    9:10 FUTURE FORCE WARRIOR

    Senior Representative

    Senior Representative, Future Force Warrior TPO, RDECOM, Natick Soldier Center, US Army

    9:50 BALANCING CURRENT REQUIREMENTS WITH FUTURE CAPABILITY DEVELOPMENT

    Colonel (Ret'd) Vince Goulding

    Colonel (Ret'd) Vince Goulding, Director, Sea Viking Division, US Marine Corps War Fighting Laboratory, US Marine Corps

  • Role of experimentation (Sea Viking Series)
  • What experimentation and combat lessons learned are telling us
  • Enhancing today's Marine for tomorrow's fight
  • Future requirements and challenges
  • Human performance and virtual training
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE BENEFITS OF UNMANNED LAND SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY FOR THE NEXT GENERATION SOLDIER

    Tim Young

    Tim Young, Head of Unmanned Land Systems, QinetiQ

  • Next generation warfare
  • Problems associated with urban warfare
  • Urban warfare robotics requirements
  • Urban warfare robotics missions
  • QinetiQ-Foster-Miller robotics
  • Urban warfare robotics concept
  • Conclusions
  • 11:40 INTERACTIVE PANEL DISCUSSION

    Per-Eric Gustavsson

    Per-Eric Gustavsson, Chairman, MARKUS Project, Swedish Armed Forces

    Colonel (Ret'd) Vince Goulding

    Colonel (Ret'd) Vince Goulding, Director, Sea Viking Division, US Marine Corps War Fighting Laboratory, US Marine Corps

    Eric Michiels

    Eric Michiels , Directorate General Material Resources, Communication and Information Systems Division, Operations C3 Systems and Deployable Systems Section, Belgian Army

    Tim Young

    Tim Young, Head of Unmanned Land Systems, QinetiQ

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    14:00 IMPACT OF NANOTECHNOLOGY ON SOLDIERS

    Philippe van Nedervelde

    Philippe van Nedervelde, Executive Director, Foresight Nanotech Institute Europe

  • Where are we with nanotech? Synoptic overview of the state of the art
  • Near-term: upgrades w. subtle & gradual impact -- lighter, tighter, faster, simpler, stronger, safer… and more comfortable
  • Medium-term: invisible foes -- deadlier battlefields & booby-traps
  • Accelerating Nano-Bio-Info-Cogno convergence yields exponentially increasing Asymmetric Destructive Capability (ADC)
  • Longer-term: the disappearing soldier – soldier-bots & bunkers
  • Mutually Assured Permanent & Pervasive Surveillance (MAPPS) to smoothen dangers-fraught transitions
  • 14:40 REDUCED WEIGHT THROUGH NANOTECHNOLOGY

  • Lightweight protective clothes
  • Lightweight helmet
  • Lightweight power
  • Lightweight weapon systems
  • Frank  Simonis

    Frank Simonis, Director, Future Technology Centre, TNO

    Steven Schilthuizen

    Steven Schilthuizen, , TNO Netherlands

    15:20 MATERIALS, (NANO)TECHNOLOGY AND THE SOLDIER

    Steven Savage

    Steven Savage, Deputy Research Director, Department of Functional Materials, Swedish Defence Research Agency

  • Examples: advanced materials and (nano)technology can make an important contribution to equipment for the future soldier
  • New materials and material concepts will be essential for the soldier to function effectively, and to survive in the dynamic situations likely to be met on future missions
  • The soldier and his/her equipment will be considered as a complete concept, where power, protection, camouflage, health monitoring, logistics and other functions are considered as a whole
  • Ethical aspects and possible legal requirements of the future mission, which may affect the materiel and equipment needed
  • soldier power
  • protection
  • health monitoring
  • logistics
  • accessories
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing followed by afternoon Tea

    16:10 Close of Conference

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