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Building on the success of SMi’s previous related conferences, this event is a more specific look into this particular concept of warfare.

The nature of warfare is changing rapidly as real-time information enhances situational awareness, decisions are swifter and the pace at which tactical and strategic targets are engaged quickens. Behind this acceleration are the technological advances in target locating, tracking and targeting via a host of multi-platform sensors and systems.

The decision-making timelines are shortening as procedures of engagement and battlespace display systems are enhanced. The need for interoperability is also a major factor for sensor-to-shooter systems as air, land and sea forces are further required to collaborate and share information on a real-time basis.

‘Sensor-to-Shooter’ has incorporated all of these factors into a two-day event incorporating air, land and sea systems integration and case studying the most up-to-date projects. Many projects covered are entering trials stage so you will be one of the first to hear the progress, future requirements and directions of these lead ventures.

‘Sensor-to-Shooter’ is organised and produced by SMi’s Defence Division: we specialise in providing senior executives and officials with timely, strategic and focused information. SMi conferences are leading-edge events offering delegates the opportunity to meet senior industry and government figures and seek their advice, opinions and future needs.

Please register now to guarantee your place at this timely and informative conference.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Andy Pickup

Andy Pickup, Centre for Defence Analysis, DERA

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Captain Robert Huddleston

Captain Robert Huddleston, Director TENCAP, US NAVY

  • Navy and Air Force combining TCT/TCS efforts
  • Attacking mobile targets within the ATO cycle
  • Reducing the kill chain timeline
  • Centralized control / decentralized execution
  • Exploiting Network Centric Warfare for the TCS/TCT problem
  • 9:40 US SENSOR-TO-SHOOTER INTEGRATION

    Ronald Mutzelburg

    Ronald Mutzelburg, Deputy Director for Air Warfare, Office Of The Under Secretary Of Defense

  • US continues to develop and field an excellent array of guided weapons
  • US continues to enhance surveillance, reconnaissance capabilities
  • US ability to find targets and destroy them in a timely manner is still a challenge
  • What are the barriers to closing this loop?
  • Institutional; Doctrinal; Financial
  • Technological;Cultural
  • 10:20 THE ATTACK OF HIGH VALUE MOBILE TARGETS:

    Peter Stockel

    Peter Stockel, Technical Manager - Future Systems Acquisition Studies, Centre for Defence Analysis, DERA

  • Operational effectiveness drivers for total system solutions in attacking HVMTs
  • Risk drivers for the target detection, acquisition, and attack - the impact of collateral damage
  • The need for a holistic approach to air weapon system, ISTAR system, C2 architecture & operational concepts
  • Concepts for closing the sensor-decision maker-shooter loop
  • Quantifying effectiveness via a C2 centred modelling approach
  • Effectiveness challenges for technological and operational conceptsq
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SMARTER THAN JUST SMART

    Robert Kemp

    Robert Kemp, Business Development Manager, Sensor Systems Division, BAE Systems, Avionics

  • FLIR’s
  • E-O targeting
  • Trackers
  • Laser illumination
  • Target identification
  • Weapons and guidance packages
  • 12:00 US NAVY NETCENTRIC WARFARE EXPERIMENTATION

    Captain Stephen Black

    Captain Stephen Black, Deputy Director, Maritime Battle Center, US Navy

  • Fleet Battle Experiment survey
  • Sensor to shooter in USN experimentation
  • Organization, technology and training to enable sensor to shooter
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 SURFACE LAND ATTACK

    Commander Steve Swicegood

    Commander Steve Swicegood, NFCS Requirements Officer, US Navy

  • Overview of the US Navy Surface Land Attack Program; Requirements; Land Attack Roles
  • Land Attack Programs (ERGM, LASM, TACTOM, NFCS, ALAM, AGS, DD 21)
  • Naval Fires Control System (NFCS) - bridge between sensors and shooters
  • System architecture; Interoperability and Connectivity; Threads of Execution
  • Potential application of Direct Sensor To Weapon Network (DSTWN) concepts in NFCS
  • Ongoing sensor to shooter initiatives during Fleet Battle Experiments; Future Initiatives in Surface Land Attack
  • 14:40 FUTURE NAVAL CAPABILITY:

    Commander Stephen D. Hancock

    Commander Stephen D. Hancock, Director Strike Technology Division, Office of Naval Research, U.S. Navy

  • Future naval capability (FNC) process
  • Concept/definition of Time Critical Strike, Kill Chain, Capability Gaps, Enabling Capabilities (EC’s)
  • Program formulation, workshops, website and investment strategy
  • Technologies funded in program
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 ADVANCED AIR AND MISSILE DEFENCE ENGAGEMENT CONCEPTS

    Tony Cosby

    Tony Cosby, Chief Engineer, Program Executive Office for Air and Missile Defense, US Army

  • Threat characteristics influencing development of Advanced Engagement Concepts
  • Limitations of Current Engagement Concepts in achieving warfighter force protection goals
  • Description of Advanced Engagement Concepts
  • Warfighting advantages obtainable with Advanced Engagement Concepts
  • Challenges in implementing Advanced Engagement Concepts
  • 16:20 GOING BEYOND SENSOR TO SHOOTER

    Will Kramer

    Will Kramer, Manager, C3I Business Development, BAE Systems

  • Overview of Link-16
  • Why Link-16 as a weapon data link
  • Operational concept
  • Current weapon data link efforts
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Andy Pickup

    Andy Pickup, Centre for Defence Analysis, DERA

    9:10 MULTI-SENSOR ARCHITECTURES FOR BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE

    Alan Steinberg

    Alan Steinberg, Technical Director, Utah State University Space Dynamics Laboratory

  • Theater and national missile defense: Concepts and systems
  • Sensor coverage and battlespace
  • Robustness issues: Threat, diversity and countermeasures
  • Multi-sensor data fusion: Opportunities and issues
  • 9:50 PROJECT LIGHTNING

    Dr. Andrew McDonald

    Dr. Andrew McDonald, Project Manager - Project LIGHTNING, DERA - Malvern

  • An overview of the work to investigate, develop, and demonstrate near-real time information flow for situational awareness, tasking of tactical air assets, and battle damage assessment
  • Scenario development
  • Synthetic environment experimentation
  • Collaborative working
  • Flight trial to demonstrate capability
  • Future developments in context of Joint Battlespace Digitization
  • 10:30 INTEGRATED AIR DEFENCE

    Ronnie Harrison

    Ronnie Harrison, Director Engineering & Future Business, Shorts Missiles Systems

  • Early warning requirements and benefits
  • Command and control of air defence assets
  • Integrated fire-control system solutions
  • Multi-role missile system effectiveness
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:20 HELMET MOUNTED DISPLAYS (HMD)

    Harry Waruszewski

    Harry Waruszewski, Avionics Systems Engineer/F22 JHMCS IPT Lead, Lockheed Martin Aero - Marietta

  • Sensing, cueing & targeting without moving the aircraft; Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) as a sensor
  • Cueing airborne sensors with the HMD; Targeting weapons with the HMD
  • Greater responsiveness to threats
  • Look - Lock – Launch; Multiple kills - First pass
  • Key system integration issues
  • Integrating the HMD into the Joint Battlefield Operation
  • 12:10 SYNTHESIS OF THE SINGLE INTEGRATED AIR PICTURE (SIAP)

    Dr. Anton Gecan

    Dr. Anton Gecan, Engineering Fellow, Raytheon

  • Definition of the SIAP - determining where and who
  • Components necessary to synthesize SIAP
  • Co-ordinate frame issues - the desirability of absolute co-ordinates
  • Use of a normalized data base; Correlation among links, track-to-track correlation
  • The necessity for kinematic stability; Deducing ID
  • Exporting results to operational units
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:00 CASE STUDY:

    Dr. Tony Kinghorn

    Dr. Tony Kinghorn, Fire Control Radar Systems, BAE SystemS, BAE Systems, Avionics

  • Air-to-air and air-to-ground long range detection and tracking
  • Rapid assessment and target identification
  • Beyond Visual Range (BVR) weapons: Meteor and AMRAAM
  • Simultaneous multiple target engagement
  • Low pilot workload through intelligent automation
  • Close integration with other Eurofighter Typhoon sensors
  • 14:40 ADVANCES IN FIRE CONTROL RADAR

    Frank Filardo

    Frank Filardo, Director, Advanced F-16 Radar Programs, Electronics Sensors and Systems Division, Northrop Grumman

  • Current capabilities of mechanically scanned radars
  • Performance and reliability improvements to mechanically scanned radars
  • Introduction to electronically scanned arrays to current rotary and fixed wing aircraft
  • Emergence of electronically scanned arrays
  • Advantages of electronically scanned arrays over mechanically scanned systems
  • Performance trades of active versus passive electronically scanned arrays
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED AIR VEHICLES

    Erik Lie

    Erik Lie, Project Manager - Mission Planning, SAAB Bofors Dynamics

  • An unmanned vehicle and Mission Planning System of today, TAURUS KEPD 350
  • Visions about Dynamic Mission Control
  • Challenges in the vision
  • Our evolutionary approach to reaching the vision
  • 16:20 SKYSHIELD AIR DEFENCE SYSTEMS IN A SENSOR-TO-SHOOTER SCENARIO

    Peter Blumer

    Peter Blumer, Sales Director, Oerlikon Contraves

  • Skyshield basic system layout: Own sensors, fire control, weapons (guns & missiles)
  • System performance: Threat, defence-power, limitations
  • Information data requirements from outside of system: type, quality, rate, etc
  • Netting Skyshield systems: High-speed real-time battle-management of such a cluster:
  • Description of solution and performance comparison; Defining the further requirements of a cluster for information data: Performance gain potentials
  • Comparison of the versions presented : Trade-off and optimum
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

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    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

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