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As a defence specialist you will be aware of recent developments within the naval aviation field. We would therefore like to invite to register for the Future of Naval Aviation Conference, as organised by SMi Conferences.

The conference will focus on the fundamental changes that are underway within the naval aviation sector. The conference will address the changing and evolving naval environment, looking specifically at the future requirements for aircraft carriers and future carrier borne aircraft. It will show how smart procurement methods will be used to initiate future programmes and how new and future technology will shape our naval forces in the 21st Century.

Since the Cold War, the role of the aircraft carrier has become one of upmost importance where there is greater uncertainty of access to suitable air bases in the modern battlefield. Mobility, sustainibility and interoperability are key elements of the modern force as well as the capability to respond rapidly and flexibly to crises over the world. The 21st Century will see the birth of the joint combat force as well as the ability to project power over long distances, effectively.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Antony Preston

Antony Preston, Editor, Navint

Dr Eric Grove

Dr Eric Grove, Director, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Air Vice Marshal Steve Nichol CBE, AFC, BA, RAF

Air Vice Marshal Steve Nichol CBE, AFC, BA, RAF, ACDS OR (Air), UK Ministry of Defence

9:40 SPECIAL ADDRESS - UNITED STATES RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS

Rear Admiral Paul G. Gaffney II

Rear Admiral Paul G. Gaffney II, Chief of Naval Research (CNR-00), United States Navy

  • How to achieve the delivery of precise high volume firepower
  • How important is the mobility and sustainability of future aircraft carriers?
  • The role of future aircraft carriers as joint command and control centres
  • Survivability: dealing with the modern day threat - Flexibility and growth potential
  • Affordability: The adoption of proven commercial methods and technologies for reduced manning, maintenance and production costs
  • Rapid and affordable reconfigurability for enhanced damage control
  • 10:20 SMART DEFENCE PROCUREMENT

    Jon Swift

    Jon Swift, Assistant Director, Procurement Management Policy, Ministry of Defence

  • Previous reforms of UK procurement practice and the results
  • Strategic Defence Review - the birth of smart procurement
  • Successful fulfilment for future aircraft carrier requirement
  • Perceived difficulties with working in partnership with the private sector to initiate smart procurement
  • Delivering value for money
  • The perceived problems of achieving required in service dates
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 KEYNOTE ADDRESS - US DESIGN CONCEPTS

    Rear Admiral William V. Cross

    Rear Admiral William V. Cross, Programme Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers, United States Navy

  • Power source considerations in the design of alternative energy catapults
  • The benefits to the ski jump design concept
  • Automated weapon selection and movement concepts
  • Advanced systems for flight operations management in the future
  • 12:00 FUTURE DESIGN

    Charles Curnock

    Charles Curnock, Project Services Manager, Marconi Marine

  • The role of computer aided design and build techniques
  • Virtual reality to design and verify structural designs and manufacturing processes
  • Product realisation through a virtual prototype
  • Building on past experience - HMS Bulwark and HMS Albion
  • The importance of cost effectiveness within construction
  • Future problems caused by size of platform
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 SMART PROCUREMENT IMPLEMENTATION

    Simon Webb

    Simon Webb, Team Leader, Smart Procurement Initiative Implementation, Ministry of Defence

  • Smart defence procurement - an overview of the current situation
  • Current government policies for smart procurement
  • The importance of this process for the CVF project
  • The implementation of smart procurement to achieve the required results
  • Lessons that have been learnt from the procurement of HMS Ocean
  • Tailoring smart procurement processes to future government requirements
  • 14:20 BOEING AND THE JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER

    Jim Schoene

    Jim Schoene, Joint Strike Fighter Office, Boeing Military Aircraft and Missile Systems

  • Integrating the best technology available
  • Creating an intensive process of research, testing and debates
  • The importance of value for money during the design process
  • Rejecting a ‘business as usual’ policy while emphasising on innovation
  • The use of rapid prototyping, innovative design and integrated product teams
  • Using advanced material and commercial manufacturing processes to cut costs
  • 15:00 Afternoon Tea

    15:20 FRENCH NAVAL VIEW

    Captain Patrick Hebrard

    Captain Patrick Hebrard, Aircraft Carrier Programme Officer, French Navy

  • An overview of current French aircraft carrier requirements
  • Charles De Gaulle case study
  • What are France’s plans for future procurement projects?
  • Consideration in design and the alternatives for future aircraft type
  • Opportunities for USA, UK and European co-operation
  • Future demands of the mobile command centre
  • 16:00 COMMONALISED DESIGN DEVELOPMENT APPROACH

    Xavier Lebacq

    Xavier Lebacq, Programme Manager, Charles de Gaulle Aircraft Carrier, DCN International

  • Future development at major system and subsystem levels
  • Aspiring to project power over long distances
  • The role of French industry in future Aircraft Carrier programs
  • Developing a commonalised design model - Development of efficient procurement strategy
  • The ability to deliver value for money
  • Future opportunities for co-operation and cost reduction across French carrier programme and UK CV(f) project
  • 16:30 SOME POLICY IMPLICATIONS

    Jeremy Stocker

    Jeremy Stocker, Department Fellow, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

  • Carriers and the Strategic Defence Review
  • Carriers and Doctrine
  • The fundamental choices and their implications
  • The limitations of the joint approach
  • The effect of new carriers on the rest of the fleet
  • Future prospects - The international dimension
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS - MAINTAINING POWER OF NAVAL FORCE

    Bruce George MP

    Bruce George MP, Chairman of the Commons Defence Select Committee / President, House of Commons / OSCE Parliamentary Assembly

  • Current situation with the UK aircraft carrier fleet
  • How will the government achieve required in service dates?
  • Government interim studies into design, layout, planning and cost elements
  • Allowing for and providing for delay situations
  • The feasibility of refitting the current fleet
  • The cost effectiveness of refitting the current fleet
  • 9:40 SPECIAL ADDRESS - FUTURE CARRIER BORNE AIRCRAFT

    Rear Admiral Craig Steidle

    Rear Admiral Craig Steidle, Vice Commander, Naval Air Systems Command, United States Navy

  • Maximisation of delivery for precise high volume firepower
  • Mobility and sustainability of future carrier borne aircraft
  • Survivability of the modern fleet in the post cold war battlefield
  • Fleet flexibility and growth potential
  • The importance of affordability
  • How interoperability can achieve battlespace domination
  • 10:20 KEYNOTE ADDRESS - FUTURE NAVAL ORGANISATION

    Rear Admiral Nathman

    Rear Admiral Nathman, Director, Air Warfare, Chief of Naval Operations (N88), United States Navy

  • An overview of current operational requirements
  • Naval force flexibility and multi-role systems
  • The importance of rapid response in the post cold war battlefield
  • Future requirements for battlefield support
  • Future demands of the mobile command centre
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ALL WEATHER OPERATION

    Andrew Maloney

    Andrew Maloney, HIGGER Programme Manager, DERA

  • Applications, requirements and philosophy
  • DERA/Industry smart initiative
  • UK development of a high integrity GPS guidance enhanced receiver
  • Launch and recovery and integrated systems approach
  • Technical risk reduction through simulation and trials
  • Future developments, collaboration and interoperability
  • 12:00 SPECIFIC NAVAL REQUIREMENTS

    David Palmer

    David Palmer, Deputy Program Manager, JSF International, Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems

  • Creating a long term carrier borne revolution in strike warfare laboratory - How can the JSF improve carrier operations?
  • Fulfilling a dual mission capability - Creating an inherently more reliable aircraft
  • Integrating superior logistics, refuelling and rearming within the JSF
  • The JSF as the primary platform for the precision guided release
  • The role of the JSF in increasing the strike power of each and every sortie
  • What are the key issues in sea conversion
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 MAINTENANCE AND SUPPORTABILITY OF NAVAL AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    Captain Michael Bachmann

    Captain Michael Bachmann, Director, Aviation Maintenance Programs, Chief of Naval Operations, Air Warfare Division, United States Navy

  • The economics of aircraft maintenance within the US Navy
  • The financial implications of maintaining future/next generation aircraft
  • Maintenance management initiatives to reduce total ownership costs
  • The growing importance of reliability centred maintenance - co-ordinating operational requirements with maintenance periods
  • Re-engineering logistics - Navy wide intranet and information technology for the 21st Century initiatives - naval aviation’s development of ‘Automated Maintenance Environment’
  • Future developments - Joint Strike Fighter
  • 14:40 EUROPEAN JSF PARTICIPATION

    Dana Pierce

    Dana Pierce, Director, JSF International Business Development, Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems

  • Bringing a full scale development and production program across the Atlantic
  • The importance of obtaining foreign partners in helping to ward off competition
  • Is there room for other companies to contribute toward the subsequent development and production work?
  • Choosing the right partner
  • Is there a future for wide spread merger/alliances within the military aerospace sector?
  • Creating a framework for international cooperation
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 UK RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

    Geoff Sands

    Geoff Sands, Business Area Manager, Sea Systems Concepts and integration Department, DERA

  • The Virtual Ship Product Environment
  • The VSPE as an information management framework
  • Ship design and engineering within a virtual environment
  • The role of performance modelling
  • 16:20 LITTORAL BATTLESPACE DOMINANCE BEYOND 2015

    Dr Paul A. Hazell

    Dr Paul A. Hazell, , ARMRADA and NATO MO 2015 Study Leadership Team

  • Security challenges and power projection - Defence expenditure trends; the looming funding crisis beyond 2010
  • Force structure implications
  • Critical roles and capabilities; the need for carriers to contribute to C4ISR, Strike, Amphibious Warfare and Air Defence
  • Promising and affordable technologies; the crucial contributions of C4ISR and Unmanned Air Vehicles
  • A Warfare Technology Vision for carriers in CJTF dominance of the littoral battlespace
  • The need for a Smart Collaborative R and D Strategy; how to avoid competitive development programmes for the next generation of carrier borne strike-fighters?
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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