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‘’Close combat, man to man, is plainly regarded as the real basis of combat’’ Carl Von Clausewitz

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks Dr. Nick Stanbridge, Senior Scientist, CDA DERA

9:10 URBAN COMBAT OPERATIONS FOR THE DISMOUNTED SOLDIER

9:40 C4I IN THE DISMOUNTED BATTLEFIELD

Mike Brown

Mike Brown, Program Manager’, DERA

  • FIST project overview / current status
  • C4I Objectives
  • Trials approach
  • Trials equipment
  • Data collection
  • Trials results
  • 10:20 DEVELOPING DISMOUNTED CLOSE COMBAT FROM A GERMAN PERSPECTIVE

    Lieutenant Colonel Mende

    Lieutenant Colonel Mende, German Liason Officer, HQ Infantry, German Army

  • Current status of infantry Dismounted Close Combat capabilities
  • Areas identified and targeted for improvement
  • Current programme progress and lessons learned
  • Perceiving the soldier as a platform – the most numerous in the inventory
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 AFRICAN WARRIOR ADVANCES

    Dr Pieter B Nel

    Dr Pieter B Nel, Program Manager, African Warrior, ARMSCOR

  • Functional areas
  • Systems borders
  • COTS/ MCOTS procurement
  • Present and future developments
  • 12:00 DISMOUNTED CLOSE COMBAT FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE ROYAL NETHERLANDS ARMY

    Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer

    Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer, Program Leader Soldier Modernisation Programme, Royal Netherlands Army

  • Infantry guidelines and training
  • Equipment currently available and planned for the future
  • Development of tactics
  • Training how to fight in an urban environment
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 CASE STUDY: THE BRITISH ARMY AND DISMOUNTED CLOSE COMBAT

    KC Jones MBE

    KC Jones MBE, WO i/c Urban Operations Training – Advisory Team, British Army Training Estate East

  • Improving operational effectiveness of soldiers
  • Fighting In Built Up Areas (FIBUA)
  • Acquiring and using advanced technologies
  • Tactics, Techniques and procedures (TTPs)
  • Lessons learnt from most recent experiments
  • 14:20 UNITED STATES MARINE CORP AND URBAN CONFLICT

    Debra Stanislawski

    Debra Stanislawski, Global Issues Branch Chief, Marine Corp Intelligence Activity

  • Defining the Urban Environment
  • Urban Intelligence Challenges
  • Future Concepts and issues
  • 15:00 THE EFFECTS OF VEGETATION ON DISMOUNTED INFANTRY OPERATIONS

    Danny Champion

    Danny Champion, Operations Research Analyst, TRAC

  • Prediction of dismounted Line Of Sight (LOS) conditions
  • Identifying geotypical vegetation density zones (biomes)
  • Determining accurate LOS in various biomes using curve’-’fitting techniques
  • Provide model developers with a tangible mechanism to predict LOS in vegetated areas
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 CANADIAN ADVANCES

    Major Greg Burton CD PPCLI

    Major Greg Burton CD PPCLI, , Director of Land Requirements 5, Close Combat (Soldier Systems), Department of National Defence, Canada

  • The importance of the individual soldier as a fighting force
  • An overview of the Canadian programme – key stages reached and lessons learned
  • The ergonomics of soldier digitisation
  • Advances in sensor technology to enhance soldier lethality
  • A look into the future – projected enhancements to the current programme
  • 16:30 RESPIRATORY PROTECTION FOR THE SOLDIER

    Hein Jager

    Hein Jager, Manager research group’-’ Skin Protection and Risk Analysis, TNO Defence Research

  • The development of respiratory equipment for the 21st century
  • Enabling the soldier to fight in adverse conditions
  • Biological protection
  • Future NBC developments for the infantryman
  • 17:00 TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATORS

    Mark Tovey

    Mark Tovey, Business Development Manager, Thales Optronics

  • The challenge – producing hardware suitable for user trials
  • A systematic approach to resolving future infantry needs
  • Packaging the system onto the user
  • The mechanics of user interactions with the man’-’machine interface (MMI)
  • A formal systems engineering approach
  • 17:30 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re’-’registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks Charles Sebesta, Managing Director, ElectBest

    9:10 LETHALITY AND SURVIVABILITY

    Peter Wallace

    Peter Wallace, Deputy Technology Program Manager, MOUT ACTD,

  • Identifying, investigating and transitioning commercial/government off the shelf systems
  • technology candidates
  • Deciding what candidates best meet operational user determined requirements
  • Testing weapons for the dismounted soldier
  • Case study: Testing the Simon Breaching Launcher System
  • 9:40 DISMOUNTED CLOSE COMBAT ROBOTICS

    Tim Young

    Tim Young, Principle Marketing Advisor, DERA

  • Problems associated with Close Combat
  • Close Combat missions and RCV requirements
  • DERA robotics
  • Autonomous Control Research
  • Advancement of Command & Control
  • RCV concepts, Conclusions and questions
  • 10:20 CASE STUDY

    Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth Wheeler

    Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth Wheeler, Project Manager, STRICOM, PM TRADE – Live Training System, US Army

  • Training and training simulators for Dismounted Close Combat
  • MOUT instrumentation
  • How modern technology is used
  • Future training devices
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE SWEDISH APPROACH TO DISMOUNTED CLOSE COMBAT

    Major Johan Benson

    Major Johan Benson, Development Officer MOUT/FIBUA, Royal Lifeguards

  • The Swedish Dismounted Soldier
  • The Swedish concept of MOUT
  • Training and tactics
  • Future concepts
  • Lessons learnt from exercises
  • Urban warfare and the Dismounted soldier’-’ should it happen again
  • 12:00 FROM RIFLEMAN TO WARRIOR SYSTEM

    Robert McIntyre III

    Robert McIntyre III, Chief Operating Officer, Simulation Technologies

  • The role of the Dismounted Close Combatant prior to the 1990’s
  • The concept of a soldier as a system
  • Emphasis on joint capabilities
  • The future role
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 SYSTEM ANALYSIS OF THE DISMOUNTED INFANTRY

    Mary Hoffman

    Mary Hoffman, Project Manager, Battelle Memorial Institute

  • Analysis methodology in support of the US Army Future Warrior Architecture and US Marine
  • Corps Integrated Infantry Combat System programs
  • Identifying dismounted infantry requirements for 2010 and beyond
  • Defining crucial capability elements: Mobility, Lethality, Survivability, Command, Control,
  • Communications, Computer and Intelligence (C4I), Sustainment and Training Determining the relationship between equipment, vignette tasks and capabilities
  • Capabilities and vignette development as the framework for modelling and simulation for technology analyses
  • 14:20 GIVING THE FORCES THE POWER

    Future battery developments – the Lithium ion

    Future battery developments – the Lithium ion, Lithium’-’ion Project Manager, SAFT

  • Supplying a range of products to all forms of military equipment
  • Powering the dismounted soldier – portable batteries
  • Requirements of a military battery
  • Future battery developments – the Lithium ion
  • 15:00 EXTENDING MISSILE AND SENSING PERFORMANCE USING ULTRA CAPACITORS

    Dr. Leslie Kramer

    Dr. Leslie Kramer, Director and Engineering Fellow, Lockheed Martin

    15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 SOLDIER MODERNISATION – AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

    Murray Fullerton

    Murray Fullerton, Programme Manager Soldier Modernisation, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Programme status worldwide
  • Problems with interoperability between national soldier systems
  • What FIST offers the modern day soldier
  • The reality of modularity and acquisition issues
  • Industrial participation in Soldier Modernisation programmes
  • 16:30 COMBAT ID FOR THE DISMOUNTED SOLDIER

    Jonathan Clegg

    Jonathan Clegg, Business Development Manager, Europe, Middle East & Africa, Motorola

  • ICIDS Operation and Description
  • Key performance parameters
  • How operational issues influenced the system design
  • Results of developmental testing
  • Relationship between ICIDS and other CID and TES systems
  • 17:00 SUPPORTING THE DISMOUNTED INFANTRY

    Jim Hitchcock

    Jim Hitchcock, Senior Engineer, Booz Allen & Hamilton

  • Command centre design and integration
  • Design support systems – solving the information paradox
  • Communications support to operations other than war ‘-’ MOOTW
  • 17:30 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Supplying the Power to the Armed Forces
    Workshop

    Supplying the Power to the Armed Forces

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    25th May 2001
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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