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This conference will look at the key Military requirements and objectives for data link policies and programmes for the 21st C. Data Links 2003 will look at data link capabilities from an operational perspective and examine future trends affecting this vital area of communication. It will aim to address country specific data link requirements and programmes as well as NATO interoperability and standardisation issues. The provision of secure, effective and fast communications is essential in a combat environment. This has become more evident as the question of information security is now a priority on many political agendas. This conference will address the interoperability challenges that effect communications between coalition forces in a combat situation. It will address the technological challenges and developments to data link systems and technologies and look at how effective information security can be achieved.

The conference will describe the national approach of the Military Data Links programmes in the individual NATO armies. It will define the main technologies used in the programs of Data Links and analyse components of Data Links suitable for implementation into C4I Systems. Furthermore, it will identify problematic areas, causes of these problems, and show alternative ways of their solution, based on the exchange of experiences between foreign and local specialists and experienced professionals. The conference will present current status in the solution of Data Links systems and the application of special components in the digitised battlefield.

Programme highlights:
· IDENTIFY the key issues affecting the application of military data links
· DISCOVER the latest developments in data link technology and data networking
· ASSESS the specific needs of military data links equipment
· LEARN how to achieve information superiority
· MAXIMISE networking opportunities in a globally attended forum and raise the profile of your organisation and its activities

A unique opportunity to learn from military, government & research experts including:
Commander Bryan McGrath, Chief, Interoperability Branch, Joint Air & Missile Defense Organisation
Lieutenant Colonel J D Wilson, Program Manager for Communications Systems, C4ISR Systems Directorate, US Marine Corps
Fred Allen, Senior Logistics Data Requirements Engineer, DoD Joint Staff/J4
Dave Clarke, Senior Scientist, Operations Research and Functional Services Division, NATO C3 Agency
Shaun Pullen, Technical Leader – Interoperability & Data Links (IODL) Project Group, Airspace Management Systems, QinetiQ
Dr Peter Highnam, Program Manager, Information Exploitation Office, DARPA
Commander Camille Sellier, OIC of the Fleet Data Link Team, French Navy
Lieutenant Giles Grima, Deputy of the OIC of the Fleet Data Link Team, French Navy
Squadron Leader (Ret’d) Paul Casey RAF, Senior Consultant, STASYS
John Hines, Technical Director, Defense Mission Systems, Communication and Information Systems Division, NORTHROP GRUMMAN Information Technology

“My first SMi Conference – enjoyed it”
Previous SMi Delegate: Robert Miller, Project Leader, Senior Principal Information Systems Engineer, C2 Platforms, The MITRE Corporation

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Squadron Leader (Ret’d) Paul Casey RAF

Squadron Leader (Ret’d) Paul Casey RAF, Senior Consultant, STASYS

9:10 THE JOINT INTERFACE CONTROL OFFICER SUPPORT SYSTEM (JSS)

Commander Bryan McGrath

Commander Bryan McGrath, Chief, Interoperability Branch, Joint Air and Missile Defense Organization

  • History
  • Operations concept
  • High level requirements
  • Fielding plan
  • Acquisition status
  • 9:40 TACTICAL DATA LINK REQUIREMENTS

    Squadron Leader (Ret’d) Paul Casey RAF

    Squadron Leader (Ret’d) Paul Casey RAF, Senior Consultant, STASYS

  • What are military TDL?
  • What warfare areas are supported by TDL information?
  • Why TDL coherence has been difficult to achieve
  • Process to be adopted to achieve coherence
  • Infrastructure required to achieve coherence
  • Military ‘cost’ of failure to achieve coherence
  • 10:20 NETWORK CENTRIC DEPLOYMENT OF LINK-16

    John Hines

    John Hines, Technical Director, Defense Mission Systems, Communication and Information Systems Division, NORTHROP GRUMMAN Information Technology

  • Link-16 operation – network centric approach
  • View from the higher-level network perspective
  • Maximising the commonality of Link-16 processing
  • The problem of platform centric deployment
  • Possible options for making the change
  • Conclusions
  • 11:00 Mornng Coffee

    11:20 UTILISATION OF TACTICAL DATA LINKS

    Mike Beever

    Mike Beever, Principal Consultant, Space and Defence Division, LogicaCMG

  • Network centric warfare environment
  • The land/soldier domain – situational awareness for the front line soldier
  • Command, control and sensor integration of UCAVs
  • Dissemination of data to and from missiles
  • Homeland security – integration of TDLs with civilian authorities
  • The way forward for TDLs
  • 12:00 AIRBORNE TACTICAL DATA LINKS SYSTEMS

    Damian Crockford

    Damian Crockford, Marketing Manager, Tactical Data Links, Ultra Electronics Sonar & Communications Systems

  • Airborne data link integration issues
  • Low cost integration
  • Flexible architecture approach
  • Upgrading to future data links
  • Concurrent link operations
  • Current and future applications
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 GLOBAL COMBAT SUPPORT SYSTEM

    Fred Allen

    Fred Allen, Senior Logistics Data Requirements Engineer, DoD Joint Staff/J4

  • Overview
  • Objectives
  • Technological advances
  • Achieving information superiority
  • High level integrated information
  • Capability to the common operational picture
  • 14:40 INTER-NETWORK INTEROPERABILITY

    Shaun Pullen

    Shaun Pullen, Technical Leader, Interoperability and Data Links(IODL) Project Group, Airspace Management Systems, QinetiQ

  • The emergence of the EXTENDOR UAV translator programme
  • Description of problems
  • The impact of previous analysis
  • Recent EXTENDOR work
  • Research into inter-network interoperability
  • Possible solutions
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TDL INTEROPERABILITY - WHAT IT REALLY MEANS AND WHY WE FAIL TO ACHIEVE IT

    Squadron Leader (Ret’d) David Clarke

    Squadron Leader (Ret’d) David Clarke, Technical Manager - Principle Consultant, SyntheSys Systems Engineers

    16:20 LINK Y

    Detlef Schmitt

    Detlef Schmitt, Head of Department, Communication and Simulation Systems, THALES SYSTEM INTEGRATION

  • Link Y - history and development
  • Main technical features
  • System architecture and components
  • Configurations
  • System capabilities
  • Network architecture and protocol
  • Tactical usage and interoperability
  • Future development
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks
    Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Squadron Leader (Ret’d) Paul Casey RAF

    Squadron Leader (Ret’d) Paul Casey RAF, Senior Consultant, STASYS

    9:10 COSINE (COALITION SHARED INTELLIGENCE NETWORK ENVIRONMENT)

    Dave Clarke

    Dave Clarke, Senior Scientist, Operations Research and Functional Services Division, NATO C3 Agency

  • Why COSINE?
  • The needs and problems of shared intelligence production in a coalition environment with non-NATO partners
  • The COSINE goal – shared intelligence analysis and production, secure information exchange
  • COSINE – NOT ANOTHER SYSTEM - but a best of breed ‘system-of-systems’
  • COSINE functional overview
  • COSINE ACTD – time scale and residuals
  • 9:40 DATA NETWORKING IN A TACTICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Lieutenant Colonel J D Wilson

    Lieutenant Colonel J D Wilson, Program Manager for Communications Systems, C4ISR Systems Directorate, United States Marine Corps

  • USMC tactical architecture
  • Building reliable, accessible networks
  • Functional allocation between voice and data tactical nets
  • IP management
  • Technology insertion
  • Migrating to the future
  • 10:20 LINK-16 FREQUENCY REMAPPING

    Kurt Nahser

    Kurt Nahser, JTIDS/MIDS Engineer, Washington DC Site Manager, Odyssey Systems Consulting Group

  • Spectrum sharing
  • Meeting challenging requirements of the 21st Century
  • Providing assurances for reduced operational restrictions
  • Future spectrum access for Link-16
  • Flexibility
  • Growth potential for future systems
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 OEF

    Commander Camille Sellier

    Commander Camille Sellier, OIC of the Fleet Data Link Team, French Navy

    11:50 ACOR

    Lieutenant Gilles Grima

    Lieutenant Gilles Grima, Deputy of the OIC of the Fleet Data Link Team, French Navy

    12:05 DATA LINKS IN THE NAVY

    Lieutenant Gilles Grima

    Lieutenant Gilles Grima, Deputy of the OIC of the Fleet Data Link Team, French Navy

    12:45 Networking Lunch

    14:00 TACTICAL TARGETING NETWORKED TECHNOLOGY

    Dr Peter Highnam

    Dr Peter Highnam, Program Manager, Information Exploitation Office, DARPA

  • Fast, dynamic, flat network for connecting tactical platforms
  • Modern digital approach; fully JTRS compliant
  • Complementary to and fully interoperable with Link-16
  • Low cost, both per unit and installation
  • Emphasis on operational ease of use and security
  • First flight tests in summer 2003
  • 14:40 IMPROVED DATA MODEM

    Sean Thomas

    Sean Thomas, Sales Engineer, Innovative Concepts

  • What does it mean to have “interoperable data communications”?
  • Who needs it, and what does it mean to them?
  • How can the need for interoperable data communications be satisfied?
  • IDM technology – past, present and future capabilities
  • The IDM solution
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 LESSONS LEARNT FROM OTHER COMMUNICATIONS DOMAINS

    Deborah Healy

    Deborah Healy, Principal Consultant, Space and Defence Division, LogicaCMG

  • Implications of network centric warfare concept for future military communications requirements
  • Key constraints of current TDL technology and example commercial technologies which could enable the NCW concept: - inflexible network configurations - data exchange mechanisms - limited information dissemination
  • Case study of use of commercial COTS to meet military requirement
  • 16:20 THE AIR FORCE TACTICAL AIR CONTROL PART (TACP-M) PROGRAM

    Philip Yanni

    Philip Yanni, Chief Engineer, ANZUS

  • Machine-to-machine target exchange from sensor to shooter
  • Acting as a gateway among dismounted soldiers, fighter aircraft and the air operations database
  • Using JMMTIDS software – command and control capability on multiple data links simultaneously
  • ROSETTA gateway between Link-16, JVMF, AFAPD, and the commercial XML/SQL standards
  • The TACP-M system
  • Ability to prioritise Link-16, Link-11, JVMF, or any sensor data over satcom or HF radio links
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close Of Conference

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