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New technology has sparked a profound revolution in military affairs and Information Superiority is a key transformational element reshaping the modern military. Having relevant data in comprehensible formats at one’s disposal first is a central goal in military operations. However, information provides the competitive advantage only when it is effectively translated into superior knowledge and decisions. Clearly a technological solution is not enough; warfighters must be able to decide and act quicker than opponents and this requires organisational and doctrinal innovation, the necessary training and experience as well as the appropriate support tools.

Information and Decision Superiority; Enhancing Military Capabilities will focus on Information Superiority as a means of providing commanders with more reliable information, in formats they can use, enabling them to make better decisions within the opponent's decision loop. The conference will provide an overview of the current situation; where the problem lies, key gaps in the information needs of the modern warfighter, and the role information superiority has played in recent conflicts.

The speakers will analyse how information superiority translates into greater situational awareness and decisive strategic advantage, giving way to decision superiority. The event will take into account decision, surveillance, intelligence superiority as well as protection (i.e. Information Operations), human factors and integration of technologies.

BENEFITS OF ATTENDING :

  • IDENTIFY key gaps in the information needs of the modern warfighter
  • ANALYSE the role information superiority has played in recent conflicts
  • EXAMINE the recent debate on achieving decision superiority
  • EVALUATE the benefits of translating information superiority into superior knowledge and decisions
  • EXPLORE the challenges of Information Operations and integration


Including valuable contributions from:

John Stenbit, Assistant Secretary for Defense (Networks and Information Integration)/ Chief Information Officer, US Department of Defense
Major General James Bryan, Commander, Joint Task Force - Computer Network Operation, Vice Director, Defense Information Systems Agency
Brigadier Nigel Jackson, Director Command & Battlespace Management/Defence J6, Ministry of Defence UK
Colonel Charles Whitehurst, Director, Global Communications & Information, Air Force Command and Control & Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Center, US Air Force
Colonel Michael McCullough, Director of Technology, Air Force Communications Agency
Colonel Cecilia Tyler, Deputy Director, Coalition Warfare, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics)
Commander Michael McCourt RAN, Delivery, Acceptance and Capability Exploitation Functional Manager, Maritime Projects Manager, Defence Procurement Agency
Lieutenant Colonel Jan van der Pol, Project Manager, TITAAN team, Royal Netherlands Army
Squadron Leader Graham Kyte MBE, SO2 CIS and Space, Air Warfare Centre RAF Waddington
Richard Wittstruck, Chief Systems Engineer and Programs Officer, PEO IEW&S, US Army
Charles Strimpler, Deputy Director, U.S. Army Communications & Electronics Research, Development & Engineering Center, Space & Terrestrial Communications Directorate, US Army Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM)
Ray Letteer, Senior Information Assurance Manager and Head, Information Assurance Branch, US Marine Corps

“Information Superiority is a leading transformation element reshaping our military today, enabling the military commander to make better decisions, based on more reliable information, within his opponent's decision loop."

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Major General (Ret’d) Bill Robins

Major General (Ret’d) Bill Robins, Independent Consultant, Bill Robins Ltd

9:10 INFORMATION AND DECISION ARCHITECTURES

John Stenbit

John Stenbit, Assistant Secretary for Defense (Networks and Information Integration)/ Chief Information Officer, US Department of Defense

  • Contributors to information superiority
  • Transforming superior information into "superior knowledge and decisions”
  • Human dimension of information warfare - Doctrine and process - Organisational structure - Operational concepts - Training and expertise
  • Key gaps in technology and doctrine
  • Experiences from the Gulf
  • 9:40 THE RACE FOR INFORMATION SUPERIORITY

    Major General James Bryan

    Major General James Bryan, Commander / Vice Director, Joint Task Force – Computer Network Operation /Defense Information Systems Agency

  • What is information superiority?
  • Importance of winning the information war
  • Information superiority strategy and goals
  • Situation assessment, mission analysis, mission planning
    Ongoing situational awareness – location, intent and activity of friendly/adversary forces across the battlespace
  • The importance of information assurance
    Problems of information integration
  • The shift in organisational, doctrinal and technological practices and the way ahead
  • 10:20 ENHANCING MILITARY CAPABILITIES THROUGH INFORMATION AND DECISION SUPERIORITY

    Brigadier Nigel Jackson

    Brigadier Nigel Jackson, Director Command * Battlespace Management/Defence J6, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • UK Vision – tempo, decision superiority, Network Enabled Capability
  • Conceptual guidelines
  • Lessons from recent operations
  • Development of command and control
  • Implementation – shared situational awareness, ISR and CIS
  • Training and people
  • Evaluation and experimentation
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 HUMAN FACTORS

    Barry McGuinness

    Barry McGuinness, Principal Scientist, Human Factors Department, BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technology Centre

  • A human-centric framework: why the human element is critical
  • Information and the cognitive domain
  • Situational awareness and sensemaking
  • Information requirements and analysis
  • Common pictures and shared awareness
  • Information trust, mistrust and distrust
    Human measurement in experimentation
  • 12:00 INFORMATION ASSURANCE

    Ray Letteer

    Ray Letteer, Senior Information Assurance Manager and Head, Information Assurance Branch, US Marine Corps

  • What are the requirements? Why is IA important?
  • IA policy framework
  • IA interoperability
  • Security best practices for general threats
  • Successful IA strategies
  • Current initiatives in the USMC
    The roadmap
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

    Dr Marion Ceruti

    Dr Marion Ceruti, Scientist, SPAWAR

  • The importance of effective information management
  • System integration and interoperability
  • Commonality of standards
  • Data access and aggregation
  • Legacy systems
  • Scalability
    What can be done to mitigate these challenges?
  • 14:40 COMMUNICATIONS IN MODERN COMBAT

    Squadron Leader Graham Kyte MBE

    Squadron Leader Graham Kyte MBE, SO2 CIS and Space, Air Warfare Centre RAF Waddington

  • Communications in Operation Telic – the end user perspective
  • Delivering a UK operational strategic communications architecture
  • Military versus Commercial Off-The-Shelf solutions
  • Shortcomings - problems with communications traffic, especially imagery - information exchange between contingent forces - information exchange between UK and US forces - limitations of information management tools
  • Lessons learned
  • The road ahead
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 COMMAND DECISION SUPPORT IN THE NEC AGE

    Commander Michael McCourt RAN

    Commander Michael McCourt RAN, Delivery, Acceptance and Capability Exploitation Functional Manager, Maritime Projects Manager, Defence Procurement Agency

  • Summary of existing CSIS IPT systems (e.g. RNCSS, RAFCCIS, JOCS)
  • Evolving command decision capability towards the NEC vision - developing the ‘real’ Joint Operations Picture - technology refresh of the existing systems - Future Common Command System (FCSS) Technology Demonstrator - Joint Command and Control Support System (JC2SS) Program
  • Meeting the Allied Interoperability Challenge
  • 16:20 IMPLEMENTING INFORMATION SUPERIORITY

    Mike Holdsworth

    Mike Holdsworth, Satellite Product Manager, Metrodata

  • Existing applications and improving network performance
  • Integrating and improving terrestrial/fibre infrastructure
  • Implications of increased use of ISR and UAV systems
  • IP or not IP - what protocol to use for military networking?
  • New technologies and applications
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Paul Kennedy

    Paul Kennedy, Independant Consultant, Information Systems and Management Services

    9:10 USING COMMUNICATIONS CAPABILITY TO REDUCE LATENCY IN THE KILL CHAIN

    Colonel Michael McCullough

    Colonel Michael McCullough, Director of Technology, Air Force Communications Agency

    9:40 JOINT TACTICAL RADIO SYSTEM

    Colonel Charles Whitehurst

    Colonel Charles Whitehurst, Director, Global Communications & Information, Air Force Command and Control & Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Center, US Air Force

  • The JTRS concept
  • Trans-platform, trans-service, trans-frequency – a tactical, operational and strategic capability
  • The benefits of switching from hardware-intensity to flexible multi-mode software
  • Tailoring JTRS to meet specific operational needs
  • Upgrade insertion and integration
    Flexibility
  • Challenges
    The way ahead
  • 10:20 MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TACTICAL ARMY

    Charles Strimpler

    Charles Strimpler, Deputy Director, Space & Terrestrial Communications Directorate, US Army RDECOM Communications-Electronics Research Development & Engineering Center

  • Mobile networking
  • Sensor networking
  • On the move antennas
  • SATCOMs
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE CHALLENGES OF CHANGE

    Colonel Alec Bain MBE

    Colonel Alec Bain MBE, Colonel Command and Control Development Centre (C2DC), Land Warfare Centre - MoD UK

    12:00 ROLE OF ISR IN INFORMATION SUPERIORITY

    Richard Wittstruck

    Richard Wittstruck, Chief Systems Engineer and Programs Officer, PEO IEW&S, US Army

  • Current technologies
  • Mission and vision of PEO IEW&S
  • Sensor interoperability
  • Technology trends for the future
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 DELIVERING THE ROYAL NETHERLANDS ARMY THEATRE INDEPENDENT TACTICAL ARMY AND AIR FORCE NETWORK (TITAAN) PROJECT

    Lieutenant Colonel Jan van de Pol

    Lieutenant Colonel Jan van de Pol, Project Manager, TITAAN Team, Royal Netherlands Army

  • Why is TITAAN needed in the RNLA?
  • How is TITAAN being developed?
  • Results – what has been achieved?
  • 14:40 LEVERAGING COALITION PARTNER INVOLVEMENT

    Colonel Cecilia Tyler

    Colonel Cecilia Tyler, Deputy Director, Coalition Warfare, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics)

  • Making co-operative programs work
  • Co-operative RDT&E success stories
  • Dealing effectively with potential challenges
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 BRIDGING GOVERNMENTAL AND CIVILIAN SECTORS FOR INFORMATION SUPERIORITY

    Gerard Donelan

    Gerard Donelan, Head of Government Services, ASTRA

  • Satellite solutions for information transfer
  • Utilisation of commercial infrastructure
  • Expanding existing technology for the warfighter
  • Provision of customised services
  • 16:20 CONSTRUCTS FOR GLOBAL FORCE MANAGEMENT

    Dr Sam Chamberlain

    Dr Sam Chamberlain, Computer Scientist, US Army Research Laboratory

  • Model-Based Battle Command
  • Force structure pulls everything together
  • Devil’s in the details – nodes and links
  • Default operational force structures
  • Identification and time – key discriminators
  • Reaching consensus – the hard part
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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