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Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Roy Ayliffe

Roy Ayliffe, Director of Professional Practice, Chartered Institute of Purchase and Supply

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Major General Tim Cross CBE

Major General Tim Cross CBE, Director General Logistics Support, Defence Logistics Organisation

  • Debate of contractors taking over armed forces duties in SCM
  • Roles open to contractors? (operation to military ports, heavy equipment transportation)
  • Analysis of civilian support staff during the Gulf War
  • Analysis of Balkans Peacekeeping and peace enforcement missions
  • Assess the Reserves Forces Act (RFA96)
  • Discussion of the increasing blur between the distinction of full-time military service and the use of contracted support to the front line
  • 9:40 UK PERSPECTIVE

    Commander Nigel J Morris and Thomas J Bolster

    Commander Nigel J Morris and Thomas J Bolster, Royal Navy - Head of Reliability Centred Maintenance and Reliability Centred Stockholding Project Leader, Warship Support Agency

  • Overview of RCM
  • Overview of RCS
  • The RN approach to stockholding
  • Progress with the RCM derived CAL for Hunt Class MCMV
  • 10:20 EFFECT OF SUPPORT SYSTEMS ON AFMC

    Garry B. Richey

    Garry B. Richey, Deputy Director for Supply Chain Management, HQ AFMC/LG (US Air Force)

  • Implementing supply chain management principles within AFMC
  • Identifying constraints to performance
  • Improved visibility tools for managers
  • Creating and sustaining improved business relationships within the supply chain
  • AFMC performance record and initiatives to improve response times
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT IN THE ARMED FORCES

    Group Captain David Kendrick, RAF (Ret'd)

    Group Captain David Kendrick, RAF (Ret'd), Senior Consultant, BAE Systems - IFS

  • Overview of the IS requirement
  • The impact of the DLO on the IS requirement
  • The strategic aim for IS
  • Problem – the engineering/supply divide
  • Problem – multiple requirements, multiple solutions
  • Solutions – the DLO aspiration
  • 12:00 US LEAP OF FAITH

    Stanley Stevens

    Stanley Stevens, Manager Operational and Logistics Concepts, Whitney, Bradley and Brown

  • Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP) providing SCM at US Marine Corps
  • Indicating government willingness to provide SCM by focusing on speed and efficiency
  • Impact of improved forecasting mechanism and JIT delivery
  • Effectiveness of ordering and shipping parts directly to the installations they are required at, eliminating storage and obsolescence costs
  • Previous success of providing SCM support to USAF Air Logistics Centers
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Siem Van Merrienboer

    Siem Van Merrienboer, Program Manager Logistics, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory

  • What are the developments in Supply Chain Management from a viewpoint of distribution systems?
  • Demand Chain Management and Category Management
  • Basics for distribution systems within the Royal Netherlands Army present and future
  • New concepts for distribution systems within the Royal Netherlands Army
  • Examples on the structure of the supply chain for the Royal Netherlands Army
  • Demands on information technology and control concepts

    The cultural change and benefits for the Royal Netherlands Army

  • 14:40 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SUPPLY CHAIN

    David Macleod

    David Macleod, Managing Director, Logistics Training International

  • Overview of training processes
  • Role of people in the supply chain
  • How training is changing with incorporation of the Internet
  • Technology being used to optimise learning
  • Future plans for direction of improving Supply Chains
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 LIFE CYCLE COSTING

    Garth Shepard

    Garth Shepard, Managing Director, Envisage Ltd

  • Learning from experience to anticipate the risk
  • New technologies and techniques for predicting the project
  • Asking for a rehearsal
  • Being able to focus on potential problems
  • A case study in virtual prototyping
  • 16:20 B 2 B SUPPLY CHAINS

    Sam Brown

    Sam Brown, European Product Manager, Manugistics

  • Effect of enhanced product quality on the Supply Chain
  • Increased efficiency means cost reduction for the defence sector
  • Role of IT in increasing supplier performance and loyalty
  • Revolution of the Internet on support for armed forces
  • Reality of software and long-term effects
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Drinks Reception for Delegates and Speakers

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Jezdimir Knezevic

    Jezdimir Knezevic, Director of the Centre for Management of Industrial Reliability, Cost and Effectiveness (MIRCE), Exeter University

    9:10 WAR-FIGHTING OPERATIONS

    Lieutenant General John N. McDuffie

    Lieutenant General John N. McDuffie, Director of Logistics, Joint Staff (J-4), US Pentagon

  • Current provider of logistics is the Pentagon
  • Possible shortfalls of current support – not flexible, mobile, efficient and interopable
  • Reason for combat troops to track their supplies at all times
  • Possible alternative – Integrated Supply Chain, providing real-time data
  • Impact of this on war-fighting operations
  • 9:40 SUPPLY CHAIN IN THE ARMED FORCES

    Colonel Robert Johnson III

    Colonel Robert Johnson III, Chief, Supply Division, Air Combat Command, US Air Force

  • Overview of SCM requirements
  • Chain of command for decisions on SCM
  • Possible shortcomings of current management procedures
  • Proposed SCM methods, and the benefits of adapting such best practices
  • Measures performance of current SCM
  • Objectives being set for future SCM in the forces
  • 10:20 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    L Colonel G.M. (Gerry) Mahon

    L Colonel G.M. (Gerry) Mahon, Director Material Management Distribution, Canadian DND

  • Breakdown of proposed elements/strategy
  • National military support capability
  • Contracting in operations
  • Tailored Weapons Systems Support
  • Supply Chain project
  • Implication/issues
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 NAVAL SUPPLY SYSTEMS COMMAND

    Kevin Fitzpatrick

    Kevin Fitzpatrick, Assistant Deputy Commander, Fleet Logistics Operation, US Naval Supply Systems Command

  • Critique of current logistical support in operation
  • The need for lean methods of Supply
  • View on outsourcing on parts of supplies?
  • Hesitancy of being reliant on non-governmental suppliers when dealing with life and death?
  • Impact of Supply methods on fleet logistics
  • Supply Chains planned to be incorporated in the future
  • 12:00 CONTRACTING FOR SUPPLY CHAIN PERFORMANCE

    Michael Taylor

    Michael Taylor, Director, Supply Chain Solutions Division, Naval Inventory Control Point

  • The shift from managing supplies to managing suppliers
  • What are the key performance metrics?
  • What are the key evaluation factors? Will it reduce costs?
  • Outsourcing to private sector - Will it reduce costs?
  • Risks in the event war
  • Private sector performance in this new environment
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 SUPPORTABILITY IN THE MILITARY ARENA

    Luke Gill

    Luke Gill, Vice President, JSF Integrated Customer Support, Lockheed Martin Aero

  • US DoD executing new acquisition strategies and enhanced support requirements
  • Total Systems Performance and Support Responsibility (TSPSR)
  • JSF a critical military program
  • Re-engineering how a weapon system is supported throughout it’s lifecycle Effect of re-engineering on reducing JSF sustainment costs and maximising overall readiness
  • Benefits of implementing inventory-management experience to save time and money
  • 14:40 SYSTEMS EFFECTIVENESS

    Jezdimir Knezevic

    Jezdimir Knezevic, Director of the Centre for Management of Industrial Reliability, Cost and Effectiveness (MIRCE), Exeter University

  • Getting the right product to the right place at the lowest cost
  • Keeping inventory low as possible while still offering superior service
  • Reducing cycle times
  • Impact of incorporating Just-in-Time methods
  • Increase ERP
  • 15:20 E-BUSINESS FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Neil Cormack

    Neil Cormack, Director, European Business Development, Advisian

  • The evolving e– market place
  • The business challenge
  • Meeting the challenge – Building a comprehensive e-capability
  • Components of an e-business application suite
  • Business benefit – Rapid delivery of ROI
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    16:10 Afternoon Tea

    +

    Workshops

    E-Business Revolution in the Supply Chain
    Workshop

    E-Business Revolution in the Supply Chain

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    6th June 2001
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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