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Since the terrorist activities of September 11th, homeland security has been a prominent and extensively discussed issue. It is now recognised that in this current world of political uncertainty world governments have a vital and difficult role of protecting against terrorist threats in order to ensure the security of citizens, the functioning of business and the delivery of good governance within the national homeland.

This year’s conference aims to improve upon the previous year’s event in all areas. The conference will commence with a series of country perspectives that highlight the current homeland security policies that are being developed and implemented. After these presentations the conference will follow a well organised structure outlining the key areas of homeland security ranging all the way from the initial stage of policy making through to the implementation of current counter terrorist initiatives.

Key issues will be discussed through out the two days, which will include critical infrastructure and key asset protection, intelligence gathering and emergency preparedness, defence against weapons of mass destruction and also the latest developments in the field of countering terrorist financing and funding.

Benefits of Attending:
· DISCOVER the latest homeland security policy issues being implemented in the UK and the US
· MAXIMISE your understanding of the current counter terrorist initiatives that are being applied in order to combat the growing national security threats
· ANALYSE global assessments of critical infrastructure protection approaches
· REVIEW the current trends in border protection and maritime security
· HEIGHTEN your knowledge of countering the terrorist threat at a financial level
· DEVELOP your overall awareness of the rapidly developing homeland security industry

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· Rt Hon Bruce George MP, Chairman of the Defence Select Committee, House of Commons, President, OSCE Parliamentary Assembly*
· Secretary Paul McHale, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense, United States Department of Defense
· His Excellency Ambassador Inocencio Arias, Chairman, Counter Terrorism Committee, United Nations Security Council, Permanent Mission of Spain to the United Nations
· Assistant Commissioner David Veness OBE QPM, Specialist Operations, Metropolitan Police Service
· Douglas Browning, Deputy Commissioner, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, United States Department of Homeland Security
· Supervisory Special Agent Frank Battle, Section Chief, Counter Terrorism Operational Response, Federal Bureau of Investigation
· Willy Deridder, Executive Director, Police Services, International Criminal Police Organisation - Interpol
· Senior Representatives, Europol
· Jan Erik Larsen, Director General, Norwegian National Security Authority
· Detective Chief Inspector Steve Ratcliffe, National Terrorist Financial Investigation Unit, Metropolitan Police Service
· Stephen Cummings, Director, National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre
· Hartmut Hesse, Deputy Director/ Head, Navigational Safety and Maritime Security Section, Maritime Safety Division, International Maritime Organisation
· Dr Gustav Lindstrom, Research Fellow, European Institute of Security Studies
· Lars Hedstrom, Deputy Director General, Swedish Emergency Management Agency
· Michael Moodie, President, Chemical and Biological Arms Control Institute
*Subject to final confirmation

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Paul Wilkinson

Paul Wilkinson, Chairman, Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence, St Andrew’s University

9:10 HOMELAND SECURITY DEFENCE WITHIN THE UK

Bruce George MP

Bruce George MP, Chairman of the Commons Defence Select Committee / President, House of Commons / OSCE Parliamentary Assembly

  • Current assessment of the threats posed to the United Kingdom
  • The Defence Select Committee’s role in the war on terrorism
  • The policy and doctrine that is being developed in order to combat the current known threats, changing perspective to deal with an asymmetric enemy
  • The impact of post September 11th events on the funding of homeland security defence projects
  • Collaboration with other committees, agencies and organisations in order to secure the United Kingdom homeland
  • The way forward for homeland defence within the United Kingdom
  • 9:40 CONDUCTING THE GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

    Secretary Paul McHale

    Secretary Paul McHale, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense, United States Department of Defense

  • The OSD’s current structure and main priorities in the effort to secure the United States homeland
  • Working in conjunction with the other federal organisations in order to increase homeland security
  • Policy and doctrine that has been developed and implemented in the wake of recent acts of terror
  • Assessing the future threats to homeland security
  • The future structure and priorities of the DoD
  • 10:20 PREVENTION OF AND RESPONSES TO THREATS TO SOCIAL DISRUPTION

    Dr Deniz Beten

    Dr Deniz Beten, Head of Threats & Challenges Section, Public Diplomacy Division, NATO

  • An overview of the role of NATO’S Threats & Challenges Section, in particular the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS)
  • The changing scope of the CCMS, what are its new aims and objectives?
  • Current policy issues that have arisen since the September 11th attacks and initiatives developed in response
  • Establishing what the new non-traditional threats to security are and what areas of society are particularly susceptible
  • The future role of NATO in combating threats to security
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE EUROPEAN UNION’S ATTEMPTS TO IMPROVE HOMELAND SECURITY AMONGST ITS MEMBER STATES

    Dr Gustav Lindstrom

    Dr Gustav Lindstrom, Research Fellow, European Institute of Security Studies

  • Assessing the major homeland security threats facing European Union members
  • The European Union’s response to these threats
  • Current policy and initiatives that are being developed
  • Co-operation with other major organisations and countries outside the European Union
  • 12:00 SECURING A NATION’S BORDERS

    Douglas Browning

    Douglas Browning, Deputy Commissioner, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, United States Department of Homeland Security

  • Current assessment of the United States capabilities
  • The role Customs and Border Protection plays within the search for a secure homeland and its co-operation with the other government agencies involved with homeland security
  • Current initiatives designed to prevent the influx of foreign threats into the United States
  • Prevention of weapons smuggling
  • Working with “friendly” foreign agencies to secure the United States
  • The future priorities for the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 PORT SECURITY

    Hartmut Hesse

    Hartmut Hesse, Deputy Director/ Head, Navigational Safety and Maritime Security Section, Maritime Safety Division, International Maritime Organisation

  • An overview of the developing threats to maritime ports
  • The development of port security provisions at the IMO
  • Where does the ultimate responsibility lie for port security?
  • Establishing co-operation between governments, port authorities and shipping companies in order to increase security efforts
  • The limitations of the current system and ways in which it can be improved
  • Future developments in port security
  • 14:40 THE COAST GUARD’S ROLE IN HOMELAND SECURITY

    Vice Admiral James Hull

    Vice Admiral James Hull, Commander Atlantic Area, United States Coast Guard

    15:20 CURRENT INITIATIVES IN THE AREA OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION IN NORWAY

    Jan Erik Larsen

    Jan Erik Larsen, Director General, Norwegian National Security Authority

  • Government commission on vulnerability of the society
  • A series of studies on the protection of society, in the areas of energy, telecoms and transport
  • An overview of the developing threats to critical infrastructure
  • Ministries, agencies and organisations involved
  • Co-ordination and control
    Norwegian Security Authority: mission and tasks
    Information security initiatives
  • Regulations on object security
    Personnel and organisational aspects
  • 16:20 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 PROTECTING CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE FROM ELECTRONIC ATTACK

    Stephen Cummings

    Stephen Cummings, Director, National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre

  • Is it possible to protect critical infrastructure from electronic attack due to the involvement of the private sector?
  • Co-operation between the public and private sector, a fantasy or imperative reality?
  • What is NISCC’s role when trying to secure the systems of the private sector?
  • Current assessment of the threat of electronic attack
  • Recent initiatives to combat the cyber threat
  • Future developments in the war against electronic attack
  • 17:00 BUSINESS RESILIENCE & CRISIS MANAGEMENT

    Peter Power

    Peter Power, Managing Director, Visor Consultants

  • Perception and examples from past crises
  • Working at crisis speed instead of normal organisation pace
  • Lessons from the past: ideas for the future
  • Dealing with the media: your best friend or worst enemy
  • Ensuring accountability, ownership and involvement
    Task separation and the need for executive buy-in
  • Bringing this all together - ideas to make it work
    Assessing performance - value of testing and exercising
  • 17:40 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Bill Durodie

    Bill Durodie, Research Fellow and Project Co-ordinator, Domestic Management of Terrorist Attacks Programme, Centre for Defence Studies, International Policy Unit, Kings College London

    9:10 COUNTER TERRORIST OPERATIONS WITHIN THE UK

    Assistant Commissioner David Veness

    Assistant Commissioner David Veness, Specialist Operations, Metropolitan Police Force

  • Current UK intelligence and counter terrorist capabilities
  • An assessment of the main threats to the UK
  • Agencies and organisations involved in the effort to protect the UK’s homeland
  • Recent homeland security operations and initiatives to combat domestic terrorism
  • Co-operation with foreign intelligence agencies
  • Establishing future threats and developing future capabilities
  • 9:40 ASSESSING THE INTERNATIONAL TERRORIST THREAT TO THE UNITED STATES

    Karl Wycoff

    Karl Wycoff, Deputy Co-ordinator, Office of the Co-ordinator for Counter-terrorism, United States Department of State

  • The US State Departments role in combating threats against the US
  • Improving the understanding of the enemy
  • The problems of dealing with an asymmetric enemy and the methods of doing so
  • Current developments in US counter terrorist policy
  • Recent initiatives that are being implemented as a direct result of recent terrorist threats on the US
  • Establishing effective co-operation with foreign government agencies
  • The future for counter terrorism policy within the US
  • 10:20 NEUTRALIZING NATIONAL SECURITY THREATS IN THE US

    Supervisory Special Agent Frank Battle

    Supervisory Special Agent Frank Battle, Section Chief, Counter Terrorism Operational Response, Federal Bureau of Investigation

  • The current national security issues that are facing the US today
  • The FBI’s involvement within homeland security operations and its co-operation with other agencies
  • Establishing what organisations or individuals currently pose a threat
  • Recent initiatives to counter terrorist threats to the US homeland
  • Developing co-operation and interaction with foreign allies
  • The way ahead for FBI counter terrorism
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PREVENTING THE THREAT OF THE GLOBAL TERRORIST

    Willy Deridder

    Willy Deridder, Executive Director, Police Services, International Criminal Police Organisation - Interpol

  • Interpol's role in the post September 11th world
  • Current capabilities of Interpol and initiatives being developed and implemented
  • Co-ordinating efforts with other agencies and government bodies and the problems incurred
  • Current schemes being introduced in order to aid the sharing of information amongst allied agencies
  • Dealing with the asymmetric threat posed by new terrorist groups to national security
  • The future aims and objectives of Interpol
  • 12:00 ADDRESSING THE ISSUES OF HOMELAND SECURITY IN EUROPE

    Mario Simancas

    Mario Simancas, Deputy Director, Serious Crime Department, Europol

  • The current homeland security problems facing European countries
  • Europol’s role in securing European countries and its efforts to assist European co-ordination
  • Dealing with the issue of permeable borders and the difficulties that this brings to the prevention of the influx of threats to national security
  • Current initiatives that are being implemented
  • The future priorities and structure of Europol
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 THE SWEDISH RESPONSE TO THE CBRN THREAT

    Lars Hedstrom

    Lars Hedstrom, Deputy Director General, Swedish Emergency Management Agency

  • Is real resilience achievable in today’s culture?
  • Current capabilities and priorities of SEMA
  • Recent initiatives being implemented in order to increase the ability to prepare for and respond to a disruptive challenge
  • Ways of ensuring that the government and government authorities can function in a time of crisis
  • The need to co-operate actively with regional and local government
  • Where does the future lie for SEMA and the Swedish response to the CBRN threat
  • 14:20 COMBATING BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    Michael Moodie

    Michael Moodie, President, Chemical and Biological Arms Control Institute

  • What is the current likelihood of a terrorist biological or chemical attack?
  • How easy would it be to disperse a biological or chemical agent effectively?
  • Known agents and their likely impact on the civilian population
  • Initiatives that should be introduced to protect against biological and chemical attacks in the light of the anthrax attacks on the US
  • Preventing the leakage of information and resources from production and research facilities
  • Stopping the “brain drain” of scientists from developed countries to unstable foreign states
    An assessment of the future biological and chemical threats
  • 15:00 REDUCING VULNERABILITY TO RADIOLOGICAL ATTACK

    Dr Frank Barnaby

    Dr Frank Barnaby, Consultant, Oxford Research Group

  • The threat of radiological terrorism to homeland security
  • Are the known active terrorist groups capable of producing and implementing a radiological attack?
  • Combating the danger of a “dirty bomb”
  • Reducing a nations vulnerability to radiological attack, preventing the influx of nuclear material
  • Protecting stores of radiological sources and information
  • Risk assessment of future radiological attacks
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 ATTACKING THE SUPPORT STRUCTURE OF TERRORIST ORGANISATIONS

    Detective Chief Inspector Steve Ratcliffe

    Detective Chief Inspector Steve Ratcliffe, National Terrorist Financial Investigation Unit, Metropolitan Police Force

  • Gathering financial information related to terrorist activities
  • Identifying and blocking assets of terrorists as well as those who support terrorist organisations
  • Harmonising international co-operation in the war on terrorist financing
  • Establishing an effective means of tracking money both home and abroad
  • Future priorities and initiatives to be implemented
  • 16:40 THE COMMERCIAL SECTOR’S ROLE IN AIDING THE GOVERNMENT CRACK DOWN ON TERRORIST FINANCING

    Bob Upton

    Bob Upton, Head of Money Laundering Prevention & Monitoring, Lloyds TSB Bank

  • The current capabilities of the private sector
  • In what ways can commercial organisations aid the current drive to stem the flow of terrorist financing?
  • Recent initiatives being implemented and the co-operation with the various government agencies and organisations
  • The future priorities and strategies being developed to prevent and protect against money fraud and laundering
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Building Resilience and Recovery Strategies
    Workshop

    Building Resilience and Recovery Strategies

    One Whitehall Place
    25th February 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    One Whitehall Place

    Westminster
    London SW1A 2HD
    United Kingdom

    One Whitehall Place

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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