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We are delighted to present you with the finalised programme for SMi’s Operational Maritime Logistic Support at Sea and Strategic Sealift conference, the only symposium at the market place to explore this popular yet insufficiently analysed aspect of naval operations.

Drawing on the experiences from East Timor, Sierra Leone and Gulf War naval operations, this forum aims to analyse the key issues raised by maritime logistics and associated movement of land forces. Attending this unique event will enable you to examine the critical factors affecting the maritime logistic operations, relevant strategic sealift issues and amphibious warfare.

At SMi, we are proud to announce that we have assembled the leading military and industry experts to tackle the critical issues related to this increasingly important aspect of modern warfare. In particular, I would like to highlight the following speakers:

· Jonathan Kaskin, Director of Strategic Mobility and Combat Logistics, US Navy (Pentagon)

· Allan Du Toit, Commander, Austrailian Navy Amphibious and Afloat Support Group, Royal Australian Navy

· Robert van de Graaf, Sales Manager-Naval Exports,The Royal Schelde Company

· Vincenzo Farinetti,Business Manager Auxiliary Naval Vessels and HSC, Fincanteri

· Eric Mitchell, Systems Engineering and Safety Manager, BAE SYSTEMS

· Captain Mark Heinrich, Commanding Officer, Navy Fuel Management

If you are involved in any aspect of strategic sealift and maritime logistics you can not afford to miss this highly topical and timely event. This is your chance to meet the key figures in this field and discuss current and anticipated future developments.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Captain (ret.) Gordon Wilson

Captain (ret.) Gordon Wilson, Strategic and Defence Analyst, Independent

9:10 OVERVIEW OF RN OPERATIONAL SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS:CURRENT & FUTURE

Commander Mike Spiller and Commander Justin Rees

Commander Mike Spiller and Commander Justin Rees, Concept Development (LOGS) and J4 Logistics, Maritime Warfare Centre and Permanent Joint Headquarters

  • Key issues in Maritime Sustainment
  • Challenges in supporting Forces in the Littoral
  • The Logistical consequences of the changing fleet up to 2015
  • Maritime Sustainability in 2015
  • A case study-Sierra Leone
  • 9:40 MARITIME LOGISTICS

    Jonathan Kaskin

    Jonathan Kaskin, Director of Strategic Mobility and Combat Logistics,

  • An overview of the history of strategic sealift in the US navy
  • Sealift implications of the January 2001 DoD Mobility Requirements Study
  • Equipment issues-maintaining a sufficient capability
  • Potential future sealift requirements
  • 10:20 STRATEGIC SEALIFT: AN ARMY FORCE PROJECTION PERSPECTIVE

    Ken Foley

    Ken Foley, Deputy Director, US Army Force Projection Battle Laboratory Support Element - TRADOC

  • Background –history and future(Med/Lt Weight Forces)
  • The Problem Described
  • Conceptual Requirements
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 HIGH SPEED SEALIFT IMPLICATIONS FOR U.S ARMY STRATEGIC RESPONSIVENESS

    John Sawyer and Ray Schaible

    John Sawyer and Ray Schaible, Research Fellow and Program Director, Logistic Management Institute

    12:00 CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT TO MEET STRATEGIC SEALIFT MISSION

    Thomas Boyse

    Thomas Boyse, Program Manager, MacGREGOR (USA)

  • Essential Characteristics of CHE
  • RO/RO Operations-Quayside, Lighter and Amphibious
  • Crane LO/LO Operations
  • Challenges of Heavy Weather Operations- Motion Compensation
  • Innovations for Various Sea States
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 OPEN OCEAN CARGO TRANSFER CONCEPTS TO ENHANCE STRATEGIC SUSTAINMENT OF SEABASES

    Bob Hamber

    Bob Hamber, System Logistician/TloaDS Analyst, Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center

  • The concept of Seabased logistics to project sea power
  • Movement of men and material on and off ships in the ocean
  • The twenty current capabilities for moving ships
  • Review of fourteen system design principles
  • Proposals for a more ambitious throughput versus sea state goal
  • Six design themes to attain goal providing Innovation.

    The design themes expand throughput versus sea state goal and solve defiency

  • 14:40 LPD® - THE ROYAL NAVY’S NEW AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT SHIPS

    Eric Mitchell, LPD®

    Eric Mitchell, LPD®, Systems Engineering and Safety Manager, BAE SYSTEMS Marine

  • The rationale for amphibious forces
  • An overview of the existing RN capability
  • The role of the LPD®
  • LPD® key features & capability
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 ITALIAN CASE STUDY

    Vincenzo Farinetti

    Vincenzo Farinetti, Business Manager Auxiliary Naval Vessels and HSC, Fincanteri

  • An overview of the Etna Class
  • The sealift requirements of the Italian Navy
  • History of the ship- sea trials to delivery
  • Carrying capabilities of the Etna Class vessels
  • Recent operational use
  • 16:20 THE VIEW FROM THE NETHERLANDS

    Robert van de Graaf

    Robert van de Graaf, Commercial Manager-Naval Exports, Royal Schelde

  • Bidding for the 1993 contract
  • The operational requirements of the Royal Netherlands navy
  • The logistical implications of the requirement to disembark one Marine Corps Battalion and equipment
  • Towards the future
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Drinks Reception

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Nigel Campbell

    Nigel Campbell, Partner, Bevan Ashford

    9:10 US NAVY’S COMBAT LOGISTICS FORCE(CLF) TRANSITION PLAN

    Jonathan Kaskin

    Jonathan Kaskin, Director of Strategic Mobility and Combat Logistics, Chief of Naval Operations

  • Determining the CLF requirements (station and shuttle ships) to support the distribution of ammunition, provision, stores and petroleum products to forces afloat-today and the future
  • The Navy’s new combination stores/ammunition ship: Lewis & Clark class (T-AKE)
  • Looking forward to future CLF requirements
  • 9:40 THE TRANSPORTATION OF FUEL IN SUPPORT OF US FORCES

    Captain Mark Heinrich

    Captain Mark Heinrich, Commanding Officer, Navy Fuel Management Systems, US Navy

  • U.S Department of Defense Assets
  • U.S Flag assets
  • Projected requirements
  • Alternatives for meeting the demands of the military
  • 10:20 PANEL DISCUSSION

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 CONTRACTING MANAGEMENT

    William Neustadt

    William Neustadt, Deputy Director Contracts and Business Management, US Navy

  • The necessity for a robust and responsive surge fleet analysed
  • Fast Sealift Ships

    - Role and capabilities

    - Contractual Arrangements

  • LMSR

    - Role and capabilities

    - Contractual arrangements

  • Ready Reserve Force

    - Role and capabilities

    - Contractual arrangements

  • 12:00 THE AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVE

    Captain Allan du Toit

    Captain Allan du Toit, Commander, Australian Navy Amphibious and Afloat Support Group, Royal Australian Navy

  • Resurgence and development of Australian amphibious capability
  • Current Amphibious and Afloat Support capabilities
  • Experiences with converting and operating the LPAs KANIMBLA and MANOORA
  • Experiences with acquiring and operating the high speed wave piercing HMAS JERVIS BAY
  • Royal Australian Navy’s future amphibious and afloat support requirements
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 THE HIGH SPEED CATAMARAN

    Commodore Bob Trotter

    Commodore Bob Trotter, Defence Business Adviser, Austal Ships

  • The operational requirements of rapid deployment forces
  • The shipping industry has already developed a system for a future amphibious navy-it is available now! No research and development costs
  • Lessons learnt from East Timor
  • Advances in speed and storage capacity
  • 14:40 THE AUSTRALIAN SOLUTION

    Robert Clifford

    Robert Clifford, Chairman and Managing Director, Incat

  • The operational requirements of Australia’s rapid deployment forces
  • Budgetary constraints and prognostics considered
  • Lessons learnt from East Timor
  • The requirements for storage capacity explained
  • 15:20 WEB-BASED PERFORMANCE MODELS FOR HARBOURS

    Professor  Agostino Bruzzone

    Professor Agostino Bruzzone, Director of Mc Leod Institute of Simulation Science, University of Genoa

  • Port performance analysis and forecasts
  • Simulation models on web environment for port performance analysis
  • Discreet event simulation reproducing port operations
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks

    16:10 Afternoon Tea and Close of Conference

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    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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