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The conference will aim to update military and industry experts on the latest developments and initiatives in Defence and Aerospace spares and inventory management.

Spare parts and the way they are managed is becoming increasingly more important. Vast amounts of military equipment are being upgraded with the ‘basic’ machine underneath still needing its original components to function. If something in the military breaks down it needs to be fixed straight away- the spare must to be on hand almost immediately or the consequences may be fatal.

There are also significant opportunities to improve the management of Defence inventory of a more efficient storage and distribution system. Leaders in the practice of integrated logistics management emphasise the use of total cost analysis to make informed trade-offs between functions to improve overall performance. There has been focus within defence on developing a management approach for inventory from this perspective.

This event will bring together leading military and industry experts to discuss and debate the new demands and complex roles of defence and aerospace manufacturer’s and suppliers of parts and components.

Benefits of attending:
ASSESS the key opportunities in modernisation through spares
DEVELOP an understanding of life cycle cost and logistical planning
LEARN about developments in the military aviation support vision (UK)
DISCOVER how to minimise risk through supply chain optimisation
IDENTIFY the various methods of management of spares

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· Colonel Raymond Mason, Deputy Director, Logistics Directorate, Joint Staff, Department of Defense, United States
· Colonel Mike Rudolph, Director, Supply Chain Management Center, Marine Corps Logistics Command, United States Marine Corps
· Lieutenant Colonel Chris Barkes, Materiel Flow Capability Change Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Wing Commander Chris Otley-Doe, Management of Materiel in Transit (MMiT) Project Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Commander Charles Jewitt, Support Business (Supply), Future Support Environment, Assistant Directorate Acquisition Support, Equipment Support (Air), Ministry of Defence, UK
· Sym Taylor, Chief Executive, Disposal Services Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Hans Eriksson, Programmes Director ILS Systems, Defence Material Administration (FMV), Sweden

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Stephen Hunt

Stephen Hunt, Director, Aspire Consulting

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Colonel Raymond Mason

Colonel Raymond Mason, Deputy Director, Logistics Directorate, Joint Staff, Department of Defence, United States

  • Overview meeting military and mission requirements
  • Increasing efficiency whilst maintaining support to warfighter needs
  • Network Centric logistics
  • Integrated logistical support and associated costs
  • Strategic material sourcing and integration of supply chains
  • Future developments in the spares supply and inventory management
  • 9:40 INVENTORY PLANNING, MODELLING AND LOGISTICS ANALYSIS

    Lieutenant Colonel Paul Dyer

    Lieutenant Colonel Paul Dyer, LARO 1, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation

  • Inventory planning
  • Equipment support modelling
  • Validation and verification of support models
  • Logistics analysis
  • 10:20 PLCS - DELIVERING THE PROMISE

    Nigel Newling

    Nigel Newling, Executive Consultant, Enterprise Integration Technologies, LSC Group

  • ILS - the theory - what was ILS meant to deliver?
  • ILS - the practice - what has ILS actually delivered?
  • Support analysis and the associated product data set
  • PLCS - aims of the initiative
  • PLCS - achievements of the initiative - AP239
  • PLCS - implementations
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS MATERIALS

    Sym Taylor

    Sym Taylor, Chief Executive, Disposal Services Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Overview of programmes
  • Key strategies incorporated in disposal activities
  • Maximisation of resources and returns
  • Supplying parts to a range of systems
  • Future developments
  • 12:00 IMPROVING MATERIEL FLOW IN DEFENCE

  • What are we about
  • Concepts
  • Exacting end to end control
  • Lines of development
  • Brief on management of materiel in transit project
  • What next ?
  • Lieutenant Colonel Chris Barkes

    Lieutenant Colonel Chris Barkes, Materiel Flow Capability Change Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Wing Commander Chris Otley-Doe

    Wing Commander Chris Otley-Doe, Management of Materiel in Transit (MMiT) Project Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 APPLICABILITY OF ERP DISTRIBUTION CONCEPTS TO DEFENCE

    Andy Worwood

    Andy Worwood, Pre-Sales Manager, BAE SYSTEMS-IFS

  • Supply chain planning
  • Multi -site ordering
  • Demand planning
  • Enterprise asset management
  • Collaboration
  • Defence specific requirements
  • 14:40 TRANSFORMING THE EXTENDED SUPPLY CHAIN

    Simon Johnson

    Simon Johnson, Director of Defence, Indus International

  • Technology trends transforming the supply chain
  • Inventory management: co-ordinating the flow of supply and demand
  • Managing the MRO buy through e-procurement
  • Integration: no enterprise is an island
  • Turning information into strategic decisions
  • 15:20 IMPLEMENTATION OF FORECASTING CAPABILITY

    Martin Ride

    Martin Ride, Manager, Spares & Commodity Management, Naval Marine, Rolls Royce

  • Securing the capability
  • Understanding the importance of data
  • Knowing your inventory make up
  • Maintaining the capability
  • Realising the benefits
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea
    Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Mark Parsons

    Dr Mark Parsons, Executive Consultant, Systems Modelling , LSC Group

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

    Colonel Mike Rudolph

    Colonel Mike Rudolph, Director, Supply Chain Management Center, Marine Corps Logistics Command, United States Marine Corps

  • Define existing logistics processes
  • Redefine the to-be logistics processes
  • Establish customer and supplier relationships and focus
  • Identify targets of opportunity
  • Train and organise
  • Pursue and implement enablers
  • 9:40 NATO CODIFICATION

    Stuart Kelly

    Stuart Kelly, Head of Customer Focus, UK National Codification Bureau, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The language of logistics
  • International programmes
  • E-business applications
  • Vision 2020
  • 10:20 CASE STUDY

    Geoffrey Malcolm Telford

    Geoffrey Malcolm Telford, RSL, Head of ISR, Raytheon

  • Partnership with industry’s third party logistics providers to apply commercial best practices and infrastructure to military product support
  • Benefits of Raytheon’s approach to replace multiple inventory locations with a centralized full service commercial facility
  • Proactive approach to sustaining/maintaining inventory levels in a military environment by leveraging OEM financial, technology and engineering and production capability.
  • Streamlining of the total supply chain pipeline to provide real measurable growth in: · Operational availability as measured by the user · Lowered total life cycle costs with improved service · Single point focus for customer service
  • PBL approach provides for an incentivized approach for technology insertion and reliability growth via the logistics process
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SPARES FOR THE SWEDISH ARMED FORCES

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans Eriksson

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans Eriksson, Programmes Director, Integrated Logistics Support Systems, FMV

  • Swedish Armed Forces – an introduction
  • The spare supply chain of today
  • The reason for change
  • Some future concepts
  • 12:00 MODERNISATION THROUGH SPARES MANAGEMENT

    Speaker to be confirmed

    Speaker to be confirmed, ,

  • Life cycle costs and system performance benefits
  • Fostering innovation
  • The role of technological advances
  • Enhanced efficiency through co-operation and systems integration
  • Technical challenges and new ideas
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 JOINT MODULAR STORAGE CONCEPT (JMoSC)

    Lieutenant Commander Charles Jewitt

    Lieutenant Commander Charles Jewitt, Support Business (Supply), Future Support Environment, Assistant Directorate Acquisition Support, Equipment Support (Air), Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Assumptions
  • Existing deployed aviation support concepts
  • The JMoSC concept - what it is?
  • Constraints on the concept
  • Scope of applicability and opportunities
  • 14:40 COLLABORATIVE INVENTORY OPTIMISATION

    David Stroud

    David Stroud, Chief Executive Officer, sparesFinder

  • Factors driving greater collaboration
  • System constraints and solutions
  • Virtual / physical warehouses?
  • Overcoming data commonality issues
  • 15:20 INVENTORY MANAGEMENT AT WESTLAND HELICOPTERS

    Jonathan Tucker

    Jonathan Tucker, MoD Executive, Barloworld Optimus UK

  • Strategic partnering through to Integrated Operational Support (ISO)
  • Inventory risk model
  • Policy and inventory modelling
  • Demand management
  • Supply initiatives
  • Forward planning and KPI’s
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea.
    Close of Conference

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