Home
overview
The prospect of NATO’s continuing enlargement and the integration of its new members is having a profound effect in the way the alliance plans and performs its air operations. A significant implication of this has been to ensure that the necessary infrastructure and capabilities are in place to preserve Europe’s security in times of conflict and peace.

At SMi’s Inaugural NATO Air Infrastructure & Programmes conference you will be able to develop your awareness of the future direction in which NATO aerial capabilities are heading. Covering NATO alliance plans, policies, programmes and systems, the two-day event will provide grounding for near- and far-term command initiatives, doctrine development, armament group requirements and solutions, major procurement initiatives and alliance led modernization programmes.

The two-day event is aimed at bringing together NATO alliance partners in a setting to enable in depth discussion of future developments within NATO aerial requirements and capabilities. In addition to providing a forum for senior NATO delegations, the conference will attract representatives from across the alliance, including those countries gearing up towards inclusion in a NATO aerial role. It will provide the perfect setting for national points of contacts to network with those representatives in NATO commands and the commercial arena.

‘The prospect of NATO’s continuing enlargement and the integration of its newest members is having a profound effect in the way the Alliance plans and performs its air operations. A significant consequence of this has been to ensure that the necessary infrastructure and capabilities are in place to preserve Europe’s security in times of conflict and peace’

Programme Highlights:
· ADVANCE your knowledge of a NATO Air Alliance post-Prague
· UNDERSTAND the implications for continued NATO enlargement and on-going integration
· GAIN an invaluable insight into future infrastructure possibilities within NATO commands
· DISCOVER the key developments within the various NATO agencies providing 21st Century support
· IDENTIFY the most critical programmes being developed to sustain NATO’s capabilities
· INTERACT with senior representatives from key NATO agencies and commands including HQ AIRNORTH, SHAPE, NIAG, NSA, RTA, RTO, NC3A and NAFAG

Major contributions from senior representatives:
· Lieutenant General Jürgen Höche, Deputy Commander, Headquarters Allied Air Forces North
· Lieutenant General Ryszard Olszewski, Commander in Chief, Air and Air Defence Forces, Polish Air Force
· Major General Edward Ellis, USAF, Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Headquarters Allied Air Forces Southern Europe
· Major General Jozef Dunaj, Commander, Slovakian Air Force
· Rear Admiral Jan Eriksen, Director, NATO Standardization Agency
· Major General (Ret’d) Marc Pirou, Deputy Director, NATO Research and Technology Agency
· Dr Raffaele Esposito, Vice-Chairman, NATO Industrial Advisory Group
· Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Schake, Air Requirements, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe
· Colonel (Ret’d) Keith Maxwell, Chief, Requirements and Architecture Branch, NATO Air Command and Control Management Systems Agency

Chairmen confirmed:
· Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes, Aerospace Analyst, International Institute for Strategic Studies
· Barry Brown, Chief, Sensors & Surveillance Branch, NATO C3 Agency

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes, Aerospace Analyst, International Institute for Strategic Studies

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Lieutenant General Jürgen Höche

Lieutenant General Jürgen Höche, Deputy Commander, Headquarters Allied Air Forces North

  • Expanding roles and missions of Allied Air Forces North
  • Security and territorial integrity of the Allied Forces Northern Europe (AFNORTH) Area Of Responsibility (AOR)
  • Conducting operations and provision of inter- and intra-regional support and reinforcement
  • NATO enlargement and implications on air infrastructure and resources
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Major General Edward Ellis, USAF

    Major General Edward Ellis, USAF, Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Headquarters Allied Air Forces Southern Europe

  • Coalition air operations; achieving objectives and strategic goals through a coalition campaign
  • Combined Air Operation Centre (CAOC); centralised planning and command
  • Air tasking cycle; an analytical, systematic approach focusing targeting efforts
  • Supporting operational requirements; producing critical Air Tasking Orders (ATO)
  • 10:20 PANEL DISCUSSION – ONGOING INTEGRATION

    Lieutenant General Ryszard Olszewski

    Lieutenant General Ryszard Olszewski, Commander in Chief, Air and Air Defence Forces, Polish Air Force

    Major General Jozef Dunaj

    Major General Jozef Dunaj, Commander, Slovakian Air Force

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 NATO INDUSTRIAL ADVISORY GROUP

    Dr Raffaele Esposito

    Dr Raffaele Esposito, Vice-Chairman, NATO Industrial Advisory Group

  • A forum for industry and for CNAD – the role of the NIAG
  • Assisting the NAFAG Groups – opportunities for cooperation and development
  • Planned NIAG contributions 2003 – 2004
  • 12:00 AUTONOMOUS AIR COMBAT MANOEUVRING

    David Lascelles

    David Lascelles, Chairman, AACMI WG, Air Group I, NATO Air Force Armaments Group

  • AACMI systems today; improvements in the field of modern AACMI training systems
  • Existing systems within NATO; identifying the need for systems to improve joint training and readiness
  • Developing a standard for common interfaces; common and open interfaces in future AACMI procurements
  • Establishing a standard NATO AACMI security policy
  • Role of NIAG SG71 and NATO AACMI Working Group
  • Future AACMI potential and affiliated studies
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 IMPROVED TRAINING CAPABILITIES AND COMBAT READINESS FOR NATO

    Philip Fisch

    Philip Fisch, CDA Director of Business Development for Training Systems, Cubic Defense Applications

  • Challenges and opportunities identified in the areas of operations and training and distributed simulation
  • Development and installation of a next generation ACT system for NATO nations assets
  • Increasing awareness of ACT-R capabilities amongst the NATO military community
  • Demonstrating ACT-R – advanced simulation and GPS
  • Establishing a permanent infrastructure and program for ACT-R
  • Benefits of ACT-R for improving NATO's operational effectiveness in air operations
  • 14:40 DISTRIBUTED MISSION TRAINING FOR NATO AIRCREWS

    Jan van Geest

    Jan van Geest, TNO Defence Research MTDS Task Group , NATO Research & Technology Organisation

  • Increasing awareness of MTDS capabilities amongst the NATO military community
  • Development and installation of a distributed simulation infrastructure across NATO nations assets
  • Demonstrating an MTDS NATO exercise ‘First WAVE’
  • Establishing a permanent infrastructure and program of MTDS exercises in NATO and the nations
  • Challenges and opportunities identified in the areas of operations and training, distributed simulation technology, security, and assessment methodology
  • Benefits of MTDS for improving NATO's operational effectiveness in air operations
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 STRATEGIC AIRLIFT CAPACITY

    Dmitry Grishin

    Dmitry Grishin, Charter Sales Manager, Volga-Dnepr Airlines

    16:20 ELECTRONIC WARFARE AND SUPPRESSION OF ENEMY AIR DEFENSES (SEAD)

    Leo Rose

    Leo Rose, Vice-Chairman, SEAD WG, Air Group III, NATO Air Force Armaments Group

  • Airborne applications of EW technology relating to: - C2 warfare, EW support equipment and effectiveness
  • NATO roadmap for EW and SEAD
  • Integration of EW/SEAD assets on platforms and across forces to provide improved survivability
  • Doctrines, policy, training and programmes
  • Technology challenges
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Smi Drinks Reception

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Barry Brown

    Barry Brown, Chief, Sensors & Surveillance Branch, NATO C3 Agency

    9:10 NATO ALLIANCE GROUND SURVEILLANCE REQUIREMENT

    Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Schake

    Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Schake, Air Requirements, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe

  • Underlying need for a standalone intelligence capability
  • NATO-owned and -operated core capability; supplemented by interoperable national assets
  • Concept of Operations (CONOPS)
  • Identification of Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS) platforms
  • Timelines and near-term developments
  • 9:40 INDUSTRIAL INITIATIVE FOR A NATO MINIMUM ESSENTIAL CORE CAPABILITY FOR AGS

    Michael R Lenton

    Michael R Lenton, Vice President, Product Policy, FINMECCANICA

  • Addressing the long-standing requirement for a NATO-owned and –operated AGS capability
  • TIPS – tri-industry industrial initiative involving Northrop Grumman, EADS and Galileo Avionica
  • System of systems approach centring on a government-to-government cooperative development
  • High technology workshare opportunities for the companies of participating NATO nations
  • Synergetic opportunities for re-use of technologies developed for the NATO core capability among national programs
  • 10:20 CTAS: AN APPROACH TO NATO AGS

    Geoffrey Malcolm Telford

    Geoffrey Malcolm Telford, RSL, Head of ISR, Raytheon

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SPECIAL ADDRESS

    Barry Brown

    Barry Brown, Chief, Sensors & Surveillance Branch, NATO C3 Agency

  • Rationale behind passive sensors – what role?
  • Description of passive sensor technologies being considered
  • Experimental results
  • Future focus – network centric sensor systems
  • 12:00 DEFENCE RESEARCH TO MEET THE MILITARY NEEDS OF THE ALLIANCE

    Major General (Ret’d) Marc Pirou

    Major General (Ret’d) Marc Pirou, Deputy Director, NATO Research and Technology Agency

  • Promoting co-operative research and information-exchange
  • The development and effective use of national defence research and technology
  • Advising the decision-makers – the RTA and NATO policy
  • RTA’s links with NATO air infrastructure – current air systems research and projects
  • Evolving air systems research projects
  • Meeting the military needs of the alliance in the future
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 NATO AIR ARMAMENT STANDARDISATION

    Rear Admiral Jan Eriksen

    Rear Admiral Jan Eriksen, Director, NATO Standardization Agency

  • Why and how is standardisation done in NATO
  • Standardisation; interoperability and integration with national partners
  • Role of the Air Armament Working Group within the NSA
  • Desired capabilities, medium and long-term within NATO
  • Emerging strike utility; weaponry and force elements
  • Technological and operational trends
  • 14:40 COMMAND AND CONTROL SYSTEM SUPPORTING NATO AIR OPERATIONS

    Colonel (Ret’d) Keith Maxwell

    Colonel (Ret’d) Keith Maxwell, Chief, RAB, Planning and Architecture Division, NACMA

  • Requirements behind NATO ACCS – why a NATO air C2 system?
  • Enabling member countries to harmonise their national efforts with international planning
  • Interoperability amongst air, naval and land capabilities
  • Defining the role of NACMA – central planning, systems engineering, implementation and configuration management
  • An architecture to provide flexibility and growth potential
  • Future timelines and programme development
  • 15:20 BALTIC COMMAND AND CONTROL INFORMATION SYSTEM (BALTCCIS)

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans-Herbert Strunz

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans-Herbert Strunz, Executive Data Responsible Agency GAFCCIS and BALTCCIS Project Manager, German Air Force

  • Closing existing gap in the area of command and control information management
  • Standardisation of command and control procedures and formats
  • BALTCCIS project organisation
  • Technical specification – interoperable with the main NATO standards by standardised data exchange
  • Common and support functionality
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea .
    Close Of Conference

    +

    Crowne Plaza Brussels Europa

    Rue de la Loi 107
    Bruxelles
    Brussels 1040
    Belgium

    Crowne Plaza Brussels Europa

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.