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This conference will provide an in-depth analysis of military spares and inventory management development. Evidently, reducing logistical output costs has become a world-wide prominent stable in government defence policy. This conference will demonstrate the most effective and efficient means of achieving this goal of reducing funding. The fundamental principles of inventory control will be examined, describing how they are being applied and to what success. Cutting-edge inventory and spares optimisation techniques will also be divulged, showing how you can consistently and quickly deliver proven results.

Benefits of Attending:
· ENHANCE your understanding of the most effective methods of spares maintenance, repair, disposal and warehouse storage
· REVIEW contemporary improvements in management systems including data cleansing, e-business and codification
· IDENTIFY how to unlock supply chain value and provide improved support to the Warfighter through current/future management advancement strategies
· DEFINE the role of industry in the provision/optimisation of spares and logistic support
· DISCOVER the most proficient methods of ensuring spares optimisation & operational readiness for military aircraft
· LEARN of the successes and lessons learned in supply support for the Challenger 2 during Operation Telic

A unique opportunity to learn from leading experts including:
· Major General Daniel Mongeon, Director, Logistics Operations (J-3), Defense Logistics Agency, US Department of Defence
· Colonel Ian Simpson, Team Leader, Tank Systems Support Integrated Project Team, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering & Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Law, TCP Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Paul Nettle, Senior Data Project Manager, TCP Team, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Wing Commander David Appleton, Head of Reliability Centred Maintenance, Corporate Technical Services, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Wing Commander Paul Hudson, Team Leader, Tornado Future Support (Off Aircraft), Tornado Integrated Project Team, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Kim Hannah, Head of Branch for Asset Management Operations, Tornado Integrated Project Team, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Paul Dyer, Head of Logistics Analysis, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation (LARO), Corporate Technical Services, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Major Bruce MacLean, Continuous Improvements Officer, Optimization Team, Material Acquisition & Support Optimization Project (MASOP), Department of National Defence, Canada
· Karen Meloy, Chief Logistician, Naval Supply Systems Command, Department of the Navy, US
· Armagan Alpan, Chief, Material Management Center, Rockets and Missiles Programme, NATO Maintenance & Supply Agency (NAMSA)

“No single organisation has all the answers. This has been a good opportunity to learn from individual successes and to pull those ideas together to achieve the overall logistics solution.”
Previous SMi delegate/speaker: Jack A Cruickshank, Materiel Acquisition & Support Optimization Project (MASOP) Team Leader – Optimization, Department of National Defence, Canada

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Brigadier (Ret’d) Frank Steer

Brigadier (Ret’d) Frank Steer, Director General, Institute of Quality Assurance

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Commander Andy Chapell

Commander Andy Chapell, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation (LARO), Corporate Technical Services, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Why inventory planning?
  • Joining up and modernising defence inventory planning
  • Supply chain simulation and modelling
  • A holistic future vision
  • 9:40 DEFINING THE ROLE OF INDUSTRY

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Director / Visiting Fellow, Derek Wright Associates / Cranfield University

  • Overview of the link between industry and spares procurement
  • The challenge of partnership and the benefits - the benefits, cost, availability, streamlining and removing some of the burden - the disadvantages, certain inventory must be kept in house to ensure availability
  • The future concepts
  • 10:20 CASE STUDY

    Colonel Ian Simpson

    Colonel Ian Simpson, Team Leader, Tank Systems Support Integrated Project Team, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Overview of the generic support chain for armoured vehicles in peace and on operations - including: asset management, repair policy, safety aspects and spares procurement
  • Support features unique to Challenger 2 - CRISP & oil health monitoring (OHM)
  • Lessons learned from Exercise Saif Sareea 2
  • Supporting Challenger 2 during Operation Telic
  • Planned improvements to current systems
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PROJECT AIR FORCE (PAF)

    Dr Charles Robert Roll Jr

    Dr Charles Robert Roll Jr, Director of Resource Management, RAND Corporation

  • Overview of PAF
  • The incorporation of advanced combat support command and control with best commercial practices
  • The goal - linking planning, purchasing, inventory management and supplier relationships to the warfighter
  • The benefits - increased competitiveness, performance, reduced operating costs
  • The future of the program
  • 12:00 ASSET MANAGEMENT IN SERVICE

    Colonel Toby Mills

    Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering and Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader (E&AM CCTL), Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Coherent asset-management across defence
  • JAMES in the land environment - supporting whole fleet management
  • Integration with supply chain systems
  • Working with industry to support CLS arrangements
  • Providing a joint logistical picture
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 RELIABILITY CENTRED MAINTENANCE (RCM)

    Wing Commander David Appleton

    Wing Commander David Appleton, Head of Reliability Centred Maintenance, Corporate Technical Services, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • A review of the concept and origins of RCM
  • How RCM has been adopted across the MoD: RAF, Army and Navy and the variance
  • Measuring the benefits of RCM, including air and land case studies
  • The disadvantages
  • Adapting the MoD’s approach to RCM to meet the challenges of CLS
  • 14:40 NAMSA SUPPLY AND MAINTENANCE CONCEPT

    Armagan Alpan

    Armagan Alpan, Chief, Material Management Center, Rockets and Missiles Programme, NATO Maintenance & Supply Agency (NAMSA)

  • NAMSA overview
  • Supply, maintenance and procurement policy
  • Central stock concept including inventory management
  • In-house and contractual maintenance
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 REPAIRABLE INVENTORY CONTROL

    Major Jürgen Donders

    Major Jürgen Donders, Commander 921 Logistics Squadron, Airbase Leeuwarden (F-16), Royal Netherlands Air Force

  • Characteristics of repairable item inventory control
  • Statistical control methods and other methods
  • Initial provisioning and sustainment phase
  • Key performance indicators
  • Developments
  • 16:20 THE DISPOSAL SERVICES AGENCY (DSA)

    Barry Teideman

    Barry Teideman, Director of Business Development, Disposal Services Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The DSA: status and function
  • The Government’s disposal agents
  • Supporting defence exports and initiatives off-shore
  • Inventory and spares management support
  • Impact of environmental legislation
  • The way forward
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Brigadier (Ret’d) Frank Steer

    Brigadier (Ret’d) Frank Steer, Director General, Institute of Quality Assurance

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Director / Visiting Fellow, Derek Wright Associates / Cranfield University

    9:10 SUPPLY CHAIN INTEGRATION

    Major General Daniel Mongeon

    Major General Daniel Mongeon, Director, Logistics Operations (J-3), Defense Logistics Agency, US Department of Defense

  • End-to-end supply chain visibility
  • Supplier and customer relationship management
  • Eliminating redundant inventories
  • National inventory management strategy – integrating to the retail level
  • Forward stock positioning – a value added tool supporting the Warfighter
  • 9:40 SUPPLY CHAIN OPTIMISATION

    Major Bruce MacLean

    Major Bruce MacLean, Continuous Improvements Officer, Optimization Team, Materiel Acquisition & Support Optimization Project (MASOP), Department of National Defence, Canada

  • Supply chain integration from production to operational deployment
  • Striking a balance between contractor management of some spares and maintaining a viable supply chain
  • Inventory ownership and supply chain interaction
  • Determining shared asset information and visibility requirements
  • 10:20 NAVY SUPPLY CHAIN

    Karen Meloy

    Karen Meloy, Chief Logistician, Naval Supply Systems Command, Department of the Navy, US

  • Performance Based Logistics (PBL) - where the Navy has taken the concept
  • Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) - where the Navy is currently and planned progress
  • The converged ERP solution
  • How the US Navy will manage and increase PBL type contracts under ERP
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 INVENTORY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    John Stephenson

    John Stephenson, General Manager, Caterpillar Logistics Services (UK)

  • How Cat Logistics manages inventory globally to optimise cost and service
  • Inventory management systems are critical to right sizing the supply chain
  • Can the unique challenges faced by the military be addressed by commercial systems and practices?
  • 12:00 REAL-TIME SENSE & RESPONSE

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d) Jeffrey Holmes

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d) Jeffrey Holmes, Executive Vice President & President of the Government, Aerospace and Defense, Manugistics

  • People, process and technology – the key to developing a responsive supply chain
  • Achieve the value of a flexible supply chain to improve customer service while reducing inventory
  • Gain visibility into your organization and enable contingency planning through the understanding of effective commercial practices
  • Improve efficiency in operations and drive costs from your supply chain
  • Leverage the wealth of data provided by leading edge technology like RFID to improve efficiencies
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 CASE STUDY: DATA CLEANSING IN THE DLO

  • Project background and objectives
  • Profiling and analysis
  • Dealing with large and complex volumes of data effectively
  • Project achievements
  • The future of the project
  • Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Law

    Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Law, TCP Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Paul Nettle

    Paul Nettle, Senior Data Project Manager, TCP Team, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    14:40 NATO CODIFICATION

    George Bond

    George Bond, Head of Business Management, UK National Codification Bureau, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Benefits
  • E-business applications
  • Data dictionaries and international standards
  • 15:20 CASE STUDY – WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (WMS)

    Joost van der Sommen

    Joost van der Sommen, Manager Logistics Planning & Control, Logistics Centre, Royal Netherlands Air Force

  • Why a new WMS was required
  • Over-view of the Logistics Centre RNLAF WMS - the advantages this has created - the disadvantages & lessons learned
  • Future plans for the initiative
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks & Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Spares Management & Modelling
    Workshop

    Spares Management & Modelling

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    15th June 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    Spares Optimisation
    Workshop

    Spares Optimisation

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    18th June 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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