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There is a consensus that the human factor has to play a central role in all technological research and development for the military of the 21st Century. SMi's inaugural Human Factors in Defence Conference will promote an understanding of the principles of human factors, evaluating human factor strategy application to systems and international procurement projects. It will review international MoD human factor policies, exposing current research issues with respect to the human capabilities, limitations and characteristics.

SMi's Human Factors in Defence event will offer a good mix of theoretical and practical papers analysing the role of human factors in tri-service capabilities, joint and coalition forces, and military capability solutions. It will also include case studies reflecting on lessons learned from recent operations, offering solutions for the future.

Learn from leading military and research experts including…

  • Sylvia Horner, Director, Human Factors, Quintec Associates and Founder Member, Ministry of Defence, UK / Industry Human Factors Integration Working Group
  • Alison Starr, Technical Manager, Advanced Crew Stations, Smiths Aerospace and Chair, UK Human Factors National Advisory Committee for the Aerospace and Defence Industry
  • Alan Poston, Chair, Human Factors Standardization SubTAG, DoD HFE TAG
  • Professor Robert Stone EurErg, FErgS, Head, Human Interface Technology Team, Birmingham University and Research Director, Human Factors Integration Defence Technology Centre
  • Dr Carol Mason, Head, Human Factors, MBDA and Member, Human Factors Integration Defence Technology Centre
  • Colonel (Ret'd) Vince Goulding, Director, Sea Viking Division, Marine Corps Warfighing Laboratory, US Marine Corps
  • Nancy Dolan, Head, HSI Office/Acquisition Programs Branch, US Navy
  • Nancy Dolan, Head, HSI Office/Acquisition Programs Branch, US Navy
  • Dr Anna Casey, Research Leader, Human Metabolic Physiology and Nutrition, QinetiQ
  • Dr Charles Kirke, Lecturer, Human Factors Integration, Cranfield University
  • Lieutenant Colonel Arne Worm PhD, Senior Scientist, C2 Systems Division, Swedish Defense Research Agency
  • Major Robert Poisson, Directorate Science and Technology, Human Performance 2, Defence R&D Canada
  • Squadron Leader Dheeraj Bhasin, 16 (R) Squadron, Royal Air Force
  • Bradley Collie, Engineering Psychologist, Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City, US Navy
  • Dr Peter Essens, Head, Team Solutions, TNO Human Factors

Benefits of Attending Human Factors in Defence:

  • EXPLORE the present international doctrine for human factors and its integration into the armed forces
  • ASSESS the current and proposed research initiatives for the tri-services
  • ANALYSE the situation concerning human factors within the coalition forces
  • EVALUATE the key lessons learned and the subsequent military technological capabilities that will be enforced
  • REFLECT on future plans and policies emphasising the importance of human factors within training, NEC, EBO and information logistics

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

Rupert England

Rupert England, Managing Director, Support Media Systems

9:10 OVERVIEW OF THE HUMAN FACTORS DOMAIN

  • What are human factors?
  • Overview of the current climate in this sector
  • The specific human factors that are under development
  • Integration into the Armed Forces
  • Alison Starr

    Alison Starr, Technical Manager Advanced Crew Stations, Smiths Aerospace and Chair, UK Human Factors National Advisory Committee for the Aerospace and Defence Industry

    9:50 THE UK APPROACH TO HUMAN FACTORS INCORPORATION

    Dr Carol Mason

    Dr Carol Mason, Head, Human Factors, MBDA and Member, HFI Defence Technology Centre

  • Development of HFI tools and processes in support of future whole-life cycle approaches to military equipment
  • The Process Improvement Cell (PIC): aims and objectives of the cell
  • HFI requirements and acceptance
  • Development of HFI training and information materials.
  • What does the future hold?
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE MANAGEMENT, COMMUNICATION AND ACQUISITION OF HSI TOOLS IN THE US

    Alan Poston

    Alan Poston, Chair, Human Factors Standardization SubTAG, Department of Defense Human Factors Engineering Technical Advisory Group (DoD HFE TAG)

  • The present situation in regards to policy and doctrine concerning human factors
  • Implications for training and simulation within the US
  • Significance of human factors engineering for the US Army
  • Identification of problems during application of HSI tools
  • Forward planning proposals within the human factors realm
  • 11:40 HUMAN SYSTEM INTEGRATION FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE

    Major Robert Poisson

    Major Robert Poisson, Directorate Science and Technology, Human Performance 2, Defence R&D Canada

  • The people
  • The process
  • The tools
  • Case studies
  • Data analysis/recommendations
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 HUMAN FACTORS THROUGH THE CADMIT CYCLE

    Sylvia Horner

    Sylvia Horner, Director, Human Factors, Quintec Associates and Founder Member, Ministry of Defence, UK/Industry Human Factors Integration Working Group

  • When to start
  • Scope of HF
  • Ownership of the risks
  • HF in the system engineering life cycle
  • Gathering HF requirements
  • 14:30 UK STANDPOINT IN THE AIR

    Squadron Leader Dheeraj Bhasin

    Squadron Leader Dheeraj Bhasin, 16 (R) Squadron, Royal Air Force

  • Human factors integration
  • What are the important issues surrounding this factor?
  • Advantages achieved by incorporating human factors into the process
  • Major concerns
  • Implications for the future
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE INTEGRATION OF HUMAN FACTORS INTO THE NAVY

    Nancy Dolan

    Nancy Dolan, Head, HSI Office/Acquisition Program Branch, US Navy

  • The policy behind the incorporation of the human element
  • The advantages of HSI for training
  • The SEAPRINT program and other US capabilities
  • Trials and subsequent results
  • Future developments in regards to human factors and the navy
  • 16:20 THE UK HUMAN FACTORS INTEGRATION DEFENCE TECHNOLOGY CENTRE

    Robert Stone

    Robert Stone, Head, Human Interface Technology Team, Birmingham University and Research Director, Human Factors Integration Defence Technology Centre

  • Why a HFI Defence Technology Centre? Research themes and key topic areas
  • The role of HFI in Network-Enabled Capability (NEC) – a socio-technical approach to developing new theories and tools for knowledge sharing and situation awareness within dynamic teams
  • Development of a unique command and control test bed featuring wearable computers
  • HFI in education and training; hierarchical, cognitive and "rapid application" task analyses
  • HFI and Synthetic Environments – applications for uninhabited vehicles and decision making in battlefield trauma surgery; evolving importance of HFI processes for serious gaming
  • Emerging software tools for HFI support – development status and availability for widespread distribution
  • 17:00 Chairperson’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

    Karen Carr

    Karen Carr, Director, Enterprise Capability, BAE SYSTEMS

    9:10 HUMAN FACTORS AND THE CURRENT BATTLEFIELD

  • Mismatch in science and technology prioritization
  • Sea Viking 06 update: what it is telling us
  • Lessons learned, capability gaps, and future requirements
  • The next logical step: Sea Viking 08
  • Partners and focus areas
  • Colonel (Ret'd) Vince Goulding

    Colonel (Ret'd) Vince Goulding, Director, Sea Viking Division, Marine Corps Warfighing Laboratory, US Marine Corps

    9:50 HUMAN FACTORS IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS

  • Extreme environments in the US Navy
  • Challenges and risks of applying human factors design guidelines and standards for extreme operational environments
  • What to do when there are no applicable human factors design standards?
  • Lessons learned
  • Where do we go from here?
  • Bradley Collie

    Bradley Collie, Engineering Psychologist, Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City, US Navy

    Julie Stark

    Julie Stark, Human Factors Engineer, Basic Commerce & Industries Inc.

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 FEEDING THE FORCES

    Dr Anna  Casey

    Dr Anna Casey, Research Leader, Human Metabolic Physiology and Nutrition, QinetiQ

  • Optimising performance during military training
  • Operational feeding
  • Ergogenic and cognitive aids
  • Gender requirements
  • International collaboration
  • 11:40 HUMAN BEHAVIOUR INVOLVING SIMULATION AND COMMAND

    Dr Peter Essens

    Dr Peter Essens, Head, Team Solutions, TNO Human Factors

  • Effectiveness in command (EffCom): involving the organisation of people and resources in regards to command
  • Simulation and evaluation in NEC command studies
  • Preliminary report of a NEC experiment
  • Building a human-oriented NEC simulation environment
  • New directions in command in NEC-based operations
  •  

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 HUMAN FACTORS IN NETWORK BASED DEFENCE

    Lieutenant Colonel Arne Worm PhD

    Lieutenant Colonel Arne Worm PhD, Senior Scientist, C2 Systems Division, Swedish Defence Research Agency

  • Sweden’s NBD lines of development
  • Critical human factors issues
  • Main NBD research thrusts
  • Human systems in NBD
  • Sample projects and applications
  • Summary
  • 14:30 EFFECTS BASED OPERATIONS

    Caroline Gowing

    Caroline Gowing, EBO Theme Leader, NITEworks

  • Current doctrinal and procedural developments in the UK approach to EBO aim to deal with the complex global strategic environment in which our military forces operate
  • EBO requires a more holistic understanding and integration between the military and OGDs, and throughout all phases of an operation, from pre-planning to post conflict reconstruction
  • It therefore requires the human operator to deal outside of the normal ‘comfort zone’ of kinetic warfare against a traditional adversary
  • Analyse the implications for selection, training, processes, organisations and technology in the new EBO era
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 INFORMATION LOGISTICS: THE SUPPORT PERSPECTIVE

    Rupert England

    Rupert England, Managing Director, Support Media Systems

  • What is information logistics?
  • CADMID & platform issues (from supportability to in-service support)
  • Capability issues (interoperability, systems of systems)
  • Future support technologies (from maintainer interfaces & HUMS to NEC)
  • Future support people (from in-house to contracted logistics support)
  • 16:20 NETWORK-ENABLED CAPABILITIES

    Dr Charles Kirke

    Dr Charles Kirke, Lecturer, Human Factors Integration, Cranfield University

  • Overview of human factors relevant to NEC
  • A closer look at two chosen areas:
  • - Influence of organisational culture
  • - Importance of trust: and how is it to be modelled?
  • So what? Implications and deductions
  • 17:00 Chairperson’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

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