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Following last year’s success, SMi's 2nd Conference on Human Factors in Defence will continue to promote an understanding of the principles of human factors and explore their importance in the design and the implementation of defence systems. The conference will address the impact of Human Factors on international government policies and guidelines and will also offer an update on current research issues with respect to human capabilities, limitations and characteristics.

SMi's Human Factors in Defence event will offer a good mix of theoretical and practical papers analysing the role of human factors in tri-service capabilities, joint and coalition forces, and military capability solutions. It will also include case studies reflecting on lessons learned from recent operations, offering solutions for the future.

The aims and objectives of the conference are to…

  • EXPLORE the changing role of Human Factors in military applications
  • LEARN from recent conflicts and operations
  • HEAR about the consequences of ignoring the Human Factors
  • UNDERSTAND policies, strategies and planning for Human Factors
  • IDENTIFY tactical developments in human factors
  • EXAMINE the practical applications of Human Factors in military programmes

Gain an insight from leading experts in the field including:

  • Alan Poston, Chairman, Human Factors Standardization, Human Factors Engineering Technical Advisory Group, Department of Defense, USA
  • Bjørn Bakken, Project Manager, Military Leadership, Norwegian Defence Leadership Institute
  • Colonel (Ret’d) Ulf Sundberg, Project Manager, Weapons and Protection/Armour and Survivability, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI)
  • Professor Dr Hein Daanen, Head, Department of Human Performance, TNO Defence, Security and Safety, Netherlands

And hear guest presentations from:

  • Dr Karen Carr, Director, Capability, Strategic Business Development, BAE SYSTEMS
  • Dr Alexander von Baeyer, Human Factors Program Manager, IABG
  • Dr Ralph Koch, Project Manager, New Projects, SDGE2, EADS Germany
  • Sylvia Horner, Director, Human Factors, Quintec Associates and Founder Member, Industry Human Factors Integration Working Group/ Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Alastair Woods, Senior Training Analyst, FRES Supportability Team, Atkins
  • Dr Alain Leger, Chief Scientist Human Factors, Thales Aerospace
  • Pamela Newman, HFI DTC Principal Researcher, Systems Engineering & Assessment
  • Dr Jennifer McGoven Narkevicius, President, Human Systems Integration, SkillsNET

Chaired by:

  • Rupert England, Managing Director, Support Media Systems
  • Wolfgang Weber, Chief Psychologist, Aviation Psychology, Insitute of Aviation Medicine, German Air Force

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Karen Carr

Dr Karen Carr, Director, Capability, BAE SYSTEMS

9:10 THE REASONS WHY: AN OVERVIEW OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR

Dr Charles Kirke

Dr Charles Kirke, Lecturer, Human Factors Integration, Cranfield University

  • Physiological, psychological, cultural factors
  • Personal history
  • Context
  • Technology
  • So what? Potential uses of this framework
  • 9:50 THE UK APPROACH TO HUMAN FACTORS INTEGRATION

    Pamela Newman

    Pamela Newman, HFI DTC Principal Researcher, Systems Engineering & Assessment Ltd

  • The UK approach to HFI and recent changed
  • The HFI DTC Process Improvement Cell
  • Predicting HFI cost-benefits to improve buy-in
  • Increasing HFI influence and visibility in trade-offs
  • Integrating social and organisational factors
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 ACQUIRING CAPABILITY

    Dr Karen Carr

    Dr Karen Carr, Director, Capability, BAE SYSTEMS

  • The capability acquisition environment
  • Trading costs and benefits at a capability level
  • The human value to capability
  • Integration across all defence lines of development
  • 11:30 HUMAN FACTORS IN A COMPLEX SYSTEMS ENVIRONMENT

    Stephen Hunt

    Stephen Hunt, Director, Capability, Aspire Consulting

  • Introduction
  • Discussion of Issues
  • Areas of concern
  • A way forward
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 MODELLING AND SIMULATION OF HUMAN FACTORS

    Dr Alexander von Baeyer

    Dr Alexander von Baeyer, Head, Human Factors Department , IABG

    Models of human behaviour:

  • Derivation from real life phenomena, e.g. typical scenarios, real events
  • Construction of validity, i.e. based upon scientific constructs and empirical research findings
  • Face validity to typical representatives of the real life
  • Non-trivial analytical and training purposes
  • Validation on the basis of real life data, collected by serious scientific research
  • 14:30 SED QUIS INTEGRARET IPSOS INTEGRARES

    Dr Jennifer McGovern Narkevicius

    Dr Jennifer McGovern Narkevicius, President, Human Systems Integration, SkillsNET

  • SEAPRINT program and other US capabilities
  • Policy and architecture to support incorporating humans into systems engineering
  • Identifying HSI work and required training
  • Trials and subsequent results
  • Future developments in regards to human factors and the navy
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CASE STUDY: ASSESSMENT OF AIRCREW SELECTION – COSTS AND BENEFITS

    Wolfgang Weber

    Wolfgang Weber, Chief Psychologist, Aviation Psychology , Institute of Aviation Medicine, German Air Force

  • A short review of concurrent selection systems
  • Simulation based assessment
  • The German acquisition of aircrew personnel
  • Cost and Benefits
  • Results
  • 17:00 HUMAN FACTORS IN THE DESIGN AND EVALUTATION OF MILITARY CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT

     Prof Dr Hein Daanen

    Prof Dr Hein Daanen, Head, Department of Human Performance, TNO Defence, Security and Safety

    17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Wolfgang Weber

    Wolfgang Weber, Chief Psychologist, Aviation Psychology , Institute of Aviation Medicine, German Air Force

    9:10 CHALLENGES FOR HUMAN FACTORS STANDARDIZATION

    Alan Poston

    Alan Poston, Chair, Human Factors Standardization SubTAG, Human Factors Engineering Technical Advisory Group (HFE TAG), Department of Defense, USA

  • A brief review of US Department of Defense acquisition reform
  • Recent policy changes impacting human factors standardization
  • Bridging the gap between research and application
  • Challenges facing the human factors standardization community
  • The way ahead
  • 9:50 HUMAN FACTORS IN NON-LETHAL WEAPONS

  • Biological effects
  • Safety
  • Physiology and psychology
  • Policy and restriction in implementation
  • Activities in the Swedish Defence Forces
  • Testing in relation to Geneva convention
  • Colonel (Ret'd) Ulf  Sundberg

    Colonel (Ret'd) Ulf Sundberg , Project Manager, Weapons and Protection/Armour and Survivability, FOI Swedish Defence Research Agency

    Dr Maarten Risling

    Dr Maarten Risling, Project Manager, Associate Professor, Defence Medicine, Traumatology Research Center , Swedish Defence Research Agency

    10:40 Morning Coffee

    11:00 HUMAN FACTORS INTEGRATION

    Sylvia Horner

    Sylvia Horner, Director, Human Factors, Quintec Associates

    11:40 TRAINING FOR CAPABILITY IN FUTURE BATTLESPACE

    Alastair  Woods

    Alastair Woods, Senior Training Analyst, FRES Supportability Team, Atkins

  • Relationship between capability and training need
  • Capability driven development within defence acquisition projects
  • Factoring Capability into FRES Programme
  • The potential impact of Network Enabled Capability
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:30 HUMAN FACTOR INTEGRATION – LESSONS LEARNED

    Chris Lowe

    Chris Lowe, Principal Human Factors Consultant , Human Engineering Ltd

  • Approach to HFI in other domains and industries
  • Successes and failures of HFI in other industries
  • Emerging and novel approaches to human assurance
  • Relevance of knowledge from HFI in other industries to defence
  • 14:00 COPING EFFECTIVLY WITH STRESS PREVENTION IN ARMED FORCES

    Dr Ralph Koch

    Dr Ralph Koch, Project Manager, New Projects, SDGE 2, EADS Deutschland GmbH

  • Investigation of stress management techniques during a virtual Cosovo terrain peacekeeping mission
  • Two types of stress load condition: emotional experience and strong interaction in driving
  • Evaluation of different coping techniques
  • Analysis of stress management training: in four different scenarios
  • 14:40 PROS AND CONS OF NET-CENTRIC COMMAND SYSTEMS

    Bjørn Bakken

    Bjørn Bakken, Scientist/Project Manager, Military Leadership, Norwegian Defence Leadership Institute

  • Results from experiments with decision makers in headquarters and military academies
  • Methodological issues in measuring situation awareness and operational effectiveness across command levels
  • Research model of the relationship between organisation structure, command level, and performance
  • Overview of the NCW Learning Lab experimentation environment
  • "Lessons learned" for researchers, experimenters and practitioners
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 HUMAN FACTORS OF HUMAN ERROR

    Dr Jan Noyes

    Dr Jan Noyes, Reader in Human Factor Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol

  • Human error, accidents and blame
  • Misunderstandings- some common myths
  • Misuse of the term – human error
  • Misleading?
  • The way forward
  • 16:20 HUMAN FACTOR LESSONS IN SAFTEY

    Robert Miles

    Robert Miles , Team Leader: Human Factors and Organisational Behaviour, Offshore Safety Division, The Health and Safety Executive (HSE)

  • Where HF fits into the management of risk
  • The importance of leading and lagging indicators
  • Indicators of poor design
  • The organisation process approach
  • Emerging trends
  • 17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

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    Workshops

    Tools, Techniques and Philosophies for Minimising Human Error in Military Operations
    Workshop

    Tools, Techniques and Philosophies for Minimising Human Error in Military Operations

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    13th June 2006
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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