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SMI's 4th Annual Supporting Forward Deployment Conference will address the emerging and future demands of the military in supporting national and multinational deployments. This conference will also analyse solutions being offered by contractors in supporting forward deployments in future operations. It will analyse the advantages and perceived risks and challenges associated with contracting out support solutions. Supporting the Forward Deployment 2004 will give case studies focusing on deployment experiences for recent operations, specifically looking at the various logistical aspects, challenges and future requirements. Case studies will also include supporting individual platforms, analysis of logistical projects and programmes as well as individual country perspectives. The underlying theme will be how to provide cost effective means to support the 21st Century soldier in the field.

· UNDERSTAND the requirements for the support of international armed forces in the field
· ANALYSE individual international case studies
· GAIN an insight into the supply of essential equipment on operations
· EVALUATE the support capabilities of armed forces

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· Major General (Rtd) Murray Wildman CBE, Managing Director, Defence Business Solutions
· Brigadier Seamus Kerr, ACOS J4, PJHQ, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Brigadier Ian Copeland, Commander 101st Logistics Brigade, British Army
· Brigadier Ian Dale, Deputy Chief of Staff, Combat Service Support, Allied Rapid Reaction Corps (ARRC)*
· Colonel Jim Veditz, Deputy Director for Power Projection and Sustainment, Joint Staff/J-4 (Logistics), US Department of Defense
· Colonel Jettaka Signaigo, Commander, US Army Medical Materiel Centre Europe USAMMCE
· Colonel Johannes Amting, Branch Chief Concepts and Plans, German Air Force Material Command
· Colonel Stuart Addy, Assistant Director Operations, Defence Fuels Group, Ministry of Defence, UK*
· Lieutenant Colonel M.B. Edwards, SO1 Defence Supply and Distribution Centre, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Angus Mathie, SO1 Ops and Plans, Defence Transport and Movement Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Jim Greaves, SO1 J4 CONLOG, PJHQ, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Reynolds, Director, School of MAGTF Logistics, Marine Corps University
· Lieutenant Colonel Jerker Westdahl, Technical Manager, Joint Forces Command J4, Swedish Armed Forces
· Commander Brian Nelson, Assistant Chief of Staff, Canadian Forces Joint Support Group (CFJSG), Canadian Forces Joint Operations Group
· Major Peer Sander Rouff, Logistics Branch, Danish Defence Command
· Randy King, Programme Manager, Contractors Accompanying the Force, US Army
· Dr Derek Wright, Consultant, Derek Wright Associates

* Subject to Final Confirmation

“Very well organised conference with relevant interesting topics and speakers” Don Trautner, Program Manager, LOGCAP

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Major General Murray Wildman (rtd) CBE

Major General Murray Wildman (rtd) CBE, Managing Director , Defence Business Solutions

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Brigadier Seamus Kerr

Brigadier Seamus Kerr, ACOS J4, PJHQ, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Strategic context of forward deployment overseas
  • UK military deployment in Iraq - challenges faced by the armed forces - successes in deployment
  • Support measures - general training - medical - transport - intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance - communications - planning - life support
  • Policy developments to enhance future capabilities
  • 9:40 THE REQUIREMENTS OF 21ST CENTURY SUPPORT

    Colonel Jim Veditz

    Colonel Jim Veditz, Deputy Director for Power Projection and Sustainment, Joint Staff/J-4 (Logistics), US Department of Defense

  • Meeting the challenge of future conflicts
  • Logistical challenges of world-wide deployment
  • Initiatives and programmes to meet the challenge of supporting future deployments
  • Lessons learned from Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • 10:20 CASE STUDY- 101st LOGISTICS BRIGADE

    Brigadier Ian Copeland

    Brigadier Ian Copeland, Commander, 101st Logistics Brigade, British Army

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 LOGISTICAL SUPPORT FOR DEPLOYED OPERATIONS

    Major Peer Sander Rouff

    Major Peer Sander Rouff, Logistics Branch, Danish Defence Command

  • The requirements of the Danish armed forces in the field
  • Providing logistical support to the Danish armed forces
  • Experiences of support
  • Future developments and plans
  • 12:00 JOINT FORCE INTEGRATION FOR THE FUEL SUPPLY CHAIN

    Colonel Stuart Addy

    Colonel Stuart Addy, Assistant Director Operations, Defence Fuels Group, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • How the UK armed forces are fuelled and supplied
  • Lessons identified from recent operations
  • Integrating with coalition forces
  • Planned improvements in the UK defence fuel supply
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 MEDICAL SUPPORT TO US FORCES

    Colonel Jettaka Signaigo

    Colonel Jettaka Signaigo, Commander, US Army Medical Materiel Centre Europe USAMMCE

  • Mission statement
  • USAMMCE organisation
  • Missions, programs and performance
  • Operation Enduring Freedom
  • USAMMCE initiatives
  • 14:40 STORAGE AND DISTRIBUTION

    Lieutenant Colonel M.B. Edwards

    Lieutenant Colonel M.B. Edwards, SO1 Defence Supply and Distribution Centre, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

    15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 BRIDGING THE GAP

    Lieutenant Colonel Angus Mathie

    Lieutenant Colonel Angus Mathie, SO1 Ops and Plans, Defence Transport and Movement Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Deployment of forces
  • Involving the commercial sector
  • Lessons learned from Operation Telic
  • 16:20 PROVIDING SUPPLIES TO TROOPS IN THEATRE

    Andrew Selley

    Andrew Selley, Managing Director, Logistics Division, 3663, first for foodservice

  • Identifying the supply route
  • Balancing confidentiality and practicality
  • Mixing rations and fresh food
  • Experiences in Operation Telic - Challenges of supply - The provision of nutritious balanced food supplies
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Consultant, Derek Wright Associates

    9:10 SUPPORT CAPABILITIES

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Consultant, Derek Wright Associates

  • An overview of current support capabilities
  • Challenges to be overcome in current support procedures
  • The impact of changes in military policy and the need for multiple deployment in multiple theatres
  • Lessons that can be learned from deployment and support operations in Iraq
  • Recommendations for the improvement of armed forces support
  • 9:40 CANADIAN OPERATIONAL SUPPORT

    Commander Brian Nelson

    Commander Brian Nelson, Assistant Chief of Staff, Canadian Forces Joint Support Group (CFJSG), Canadian Forces Joint Operations Group

  • The W5 requirements of the Canadian forces for joint support within expeditionary operations
  • Providing the "HOW" of joint logistical support to the Canadian Forces
  • Current experiences and lessons learnt from the Balkans, Africa, SW Asia, ISAF and ancillary operations
  • Future developments and plans for joint support
  • 10:20 THE GERMAN APPROACH TO SUPPORTING FORWARD DEPLOYMENT

    Colonel Johannes Amting

    Colonel Johannes Amting, Branch Chief, Concepts and Plans, German Air Force Material Command

  • Changes in the requirement for logistical support in the 21st Century
  • Challenges facing the German armed forces in support operations
  • Lessons learned in the field
  • Implementing lessons learned in future operations
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 US SUPPORT FOR RAPID DEPLOYMENT

    James Weiss

    James Weiss, Program Manager, Operational Logistics, Logistics Management Institute

  • Understanding the requirements for rapid deployment
  • Enhancing rapid deployment capabilities
  • Key lessons learned from deployment in Iraq
  • Changes to policy to improve support
  • Future steps
  • 12:00 THE PARTICULAR REQUIREMENTS OF SUPPORTING PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

    Lieutenant Colonel Jerker Westdahl

    Lieutenant Colonel Jerker Westdahl, Technical Manager, Joint Forces Command J4, Swedish Armed Forces

  • The Swedish armed forces commitment to peacekeeping operations
  • The particular requirements for the support of peacekeeping and humanitarian operations - medical supplies - humanitarian supplies - providing infrastructural support
  • Experiences of providing support for peacekeeping operations
  • Spare parts
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 TRAINING FOR FORWARD SUPPORT

    Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Reynolds

    Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Reynolds, Director, School of MAGTF Logistics, Marine Corps University

  • Meeting the dynamic logistics challenges of the present and the future
  • Training programmes designed to address emerging warfighting concepts
  • Implementing lessons learned from recent operations into future training programmes
  • 14:20 THE ROLE OF CONTRACTORS ON THE BATTLEFIELD

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Greaves

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Greaves, SO1 J4 CONLOG, PJHQ, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • CONDO and how it interfaces with contractors
  • The importance of contractors in deployed operations
  • The division of responsibility, who is responsible for contractors on the battlefield?
  • Experiences of using contractors in Operation Telic - contractors performance on deployment - challenges associated with employing commercial contractors in areas of conflict - lessons learned from Operation Telic
  • Opportunities for the future use of contractors on the battlefield
  • 15:00 IDENTIFYING THE CONTRACTOR’S DUTY AND RESPONSIBILITY IN FORWARD DEPLOYMENT

    Randy King

    Randy King, Contractors Accompanying the Force Programme Manager, US Army

  • Contractors as an added support to military capabilities
  • Identifying the areas where contractor support would enhance support for operations
  • Types of contractor and their jobs
  • The implications of involving contractors in deployment operations
  • Recent experiences in the use of contractors to support forward deployment
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 CONTRACTORS WITHIN FORWARD DEPLOYMENT

    Tim Raupp

    Tim Raupp, Director, Integrated Logistic Support, Oshkosh Truck Corporation

  • Experience & requirements in support of US forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Requirements for successful world-wide deployment
  • New challenges and opportunities for contractors
  • Developing a support infrastructure for multiple operations
  • Integrated world-wide supply chain and service support
  • 16:40 DEPLOYING FORWARD SUPPORT

    Ben Lyon

    Ben Lyon, Marketing Manager, Racal Instruments

  • New test and diagnostic capabilities at the Front Line.
  • Telemetrics and testing for tomorrow.
  • Common test architectures and Interoperability for 2nd Line support.
  • On-line expertise for all – the Test Web.
  • Maintenance data – uses and abuses.
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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