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This unique forum deals exclusively with the crucial issues surrounding naval force protection and the fundamnetal changes that are underway within this sector. It will examine the latest technology developments as well as address the crucial policy and operational implications for naval force protection in emerging maritime scenarios.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS DEFINING NAVAL FORCE PROTECTION

Rear Admiral Hans Kristian Svensholt

Rear Admiral Hans Kristian Svensholt, Chief of Staff, Royal Norwegian Navy

  • The need to defend your group of assets in the littoral
  • What constitutes naval force protection for the Royal Norwegian Navy?
  • Active or passive defence? What are the options?
  • Adopting an integrated approach to active defence
  • Establishing the distinction between a defence capability and an attack capability
  • Defining future operational requirements for force protection in the littoral
  • 9:40 US NAVY FORCE PROTECTION

    Captain Tim Holden

    Captain Tim Holden, Director Anti Terrorism and Force Protection, United States Navy

  • Vision
  • Organisation
  • Strategy
  • Assessments
  • Resources
  • Technology
  • 10:20 AIR WARFARE – ROYAL NAVY PERSPECTIVE

    Captain Christopher Waite

    Captain Christopher Waite, FONA CSO(OC), Royal Navy

  • Overview of the principles for air warfare in force protection: -Denying intelligence to the enemy -Obtaining warning -Applying defence in depth -Co-ordinating air defence activity
  • The use of shore-based and organic Airborne Early Warning (AEW)
  • The role of fighter aircraft and ships armed with surface to air missiles
  • The implications of working within the confines of the littoral
  • 11:00 Morning coffee

    11:20 WORKING WITHIN THE CONFINES OF THE LITTORAL

    Captain Bjorn Ljunggren (RSwN)

    Captain Bjorn Ljunggren (RSwN), Director International Relations, Defence Materiel Administration (Sweden)

  • Working within the confines of the littoral
  • Surface warfare
  • Technology for the littoral
  • Stealth tactics
  • 12:00 EVOLVED SEASPARROW MISSILE (ESSM)

    Captain Kees de Vries (RNLN)

    Captain Kees de Vries (RNLN), Deputy Project Manager (N00B), NATO Seasparrow Project Office

  • ESSM is multinational co-operative model for future programs
  • ESSM is being developed and produced by 22 companies in 10 nations in the NATO Seasparrow Consortium in accordance with widely distributed workshare requirements
  • 10 countries together can field an ESSM in a fiscal environment where no single country can do so alone
  • ESSM is cornerstone to counter the future anti-ship cruise missile threat
  • ESSM provides high performance characteristics, adaptability to multiple platforms, launch versatility and affordability
  • Co-operation is based on international integrated product teams employing fully electronic data exchange and communication
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:35 NAVAL FORCE PROTECTION WITHIN NETWORK-CENTRIC OPERATIONS (NCO)

    Dr Edward Whitman

    Dr Edward Whitman, Naval Science Advisor, Center for Security Strategies and Operations, Techmatics

  • Elements of knowledge superiority
  • Information networks for the naval force
  • Intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance in NCO
  • Assuring communications bandwidth
  • US Navy progress toward network centricity
  • Operational and doctrinal implications; key issues
  • 14:00 PHYSIOLOGICAL PROTECTION AGAINST CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS

    Dr Jonathan Kaufman

    Dr Jonathan Kaufman, Research Physiologist, Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, United States Navy

  • Physical and chemical properties of agents
  • Physiological mode of action
  • Respiratory threats
  • Transcutaneous delivery
  • Semi-permeable vs selective permeability vs impermeable materials
  • Heat stress
  • 15:20 Afternoon tea

    15:40 THE EVOLVING SEA THREAT

    Guy Stitt

    Guy Stitt, President, AMI International

  • A review of the issues driving naval budgets today and the difference between conflicts and threats
  • Evolution and future changes in the Anti-Ship Missile threat to naval forces
  • Defining the “Threat Cocktail” to naval forces
  • A brief review of high speed patrol craft and low, slow flying aircraft and helos
  • How are the navies responding to these evolutions in the threat
  • Important considerations for navies and industry
  • 16:20 FORCE PROTECTION IN A COMPLEX BATTLESPACE

    Tim Kilvert-Jones

    Tim Kilvert-Jones, Programme Manager, Military Training Systems, Unitech

  • An historical perspective
  • The dominant trend: operations in the littoral battlespace
  • Friction: environment and interoperability
  • The thinking enemy
  • New strategies for equipment acquisition to meet the challenge
  • The way ahead
  • 17:00 Chairman's closing remarks and close of day one

    8:30 Re-registration and coffee

    9:00 chairman's Opening Remarks

    E R Hooton

    E R Hooton, Editor, Jane's Naval Weapons Systems

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS THEATER AIR WARFARE

    Captain John Kelly

    Captain John Kelly, Director Theater Air Warfare, United States Navy

  • A review of Navy Area Program: providing missile protection to: - The fleet - Amphibious operating areas - Dedicated seaports - Airfields/key areas ashore
  • A review of Navy Theater Wide Program: providing protection for an entire theater of operations from ships at sea
  • Family of systems: US approach of tying in airborne, afloat and ashore weapons systems with: - Space based sensors - Airborne (airplanes/UAVs) based sensors - Ground based sensors - Sea based sensors
  • Test event results of most recent “at sea” testing and missile firing
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS PROTECTING IN THREE DIMENSIONS

    Rear Admiral I A Forbes

    Rear Admiral I A Forbes, Commander UK Task Group, Royal Navy

  • The need to protect against land/air/surface/sub-surface attack
  • The role of force protection within power projection
  • The need to respond to new threat scenarios in the battlefield
  • The development of an interoperable multi disciplinary fleet for force protection
  • Future demands on the mobile command and control centre
  • 10:20 THE FUTURE OF NAVAL LITTORAL OPERATIONS

    John Carey

    John Carey, President, International Defense

    11:00 Morning coffee

    11:20 DECOY SYSTEMS

    Heinz Bannasch

    Heinz Bannasch, Director, Self-Protection Systems, BUCK Neue Technologien

  • The state of modern threat by infra-red and radar-guided anti-ship missiles
  • Countering through modern decoy systems
  • Results from sea-trials and simulation systems
  • 12:00 UNDERSTANDING THE SCEANRIO

    Michael Collins

    Michael Collins, Senior Marketing Manager, Racal Radar Defence Systems

  • How much knowledge is a good thing?
  • The benefits of covert comprehension
  • Non-co-operative passive picture compilation
  • Cost and value of timeliness and accuracy
  • Contribution to force protection and survivability
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 UNDERWATER SIGNATURES MANAGEMENT

    Dr Peter Watkinson

    Dr Peter Watkinson, Signatures Manager, Marconi Astute Class

  • The management process
  • Review of signatures
  • Tools and technology
  • Requirements and specifications
  • 14:40 PYROTECHNICS AND DECOYS

    John Taylor

    John Taylor, Business Director, Wallop Defence Systems

  • Identifying the future threats in the naval environment
  • Fast reaction times to improve survivability
  • Adapting the decoy solution to ships of different sizes without losing performance
  • Integrating the system with other countermeasure solutions
  • Delivering a low maintenance and easy to use survivability solution
  • Overcoming launching problems on different platforms
  • 15:20 Afternoon tea

    15:40 UNDERWATER GUIDED WEAPONS

    Robert Moran

    Robert Moran, Regional Sales Manager, Marconi Electronic Systems

  • Naval force protection scenarios the underwater weapon perspective
  • Environmental considerations
  • Threat Prosecution: Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
  • Future underwater weapon developments
  • The use of Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUV’s) – data gathering and payload delivery
  • 16:20 FORCE PROTECTION

    Gary James

    Gary James, Senior Manager, Surface Navy Air Defence Systems Business Development, Raytheon Systems

  • RAM
  • ESSM
  • SEA RAM
  • PHALANX IB, Land Attack Standard Missile
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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