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Following on in the series of successful SMi military IT events, SMi Defence have produced this latest two-day conference to address this highly-topical and important concept and its effect on the Naval C4I community.

This event aims to address the key policy and strategy developments relating to the future of Network Centric Warfare as well as assess the integration of critical naval C4I technologies and development of the network architecture. It will give an international audience the opportunity to assess the implications and developments this largely US-led concept will have on naval warfare in the next century.

By assembling an international panel of expert speakers, this conference will provide you with an excellent overview of a critical new concept and ensure that you are strategically placed to maximise its operational and commercial potential.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

John Garstka

John Garstka, Scientific and Technical Advisor, Directorate for C4 Systems, US Joint Chiefs of Staff

  • Joint Vision 2010
  • Enabling role of Information Technology
  • Information superiority and network-centric operations
  • Emerging concepts of Network-Centric Warfare (NCW)
  • Sources of increased combat power for NCW
  • The global information grid as the 'entry fee'
  • 10:10 EXTENDING THE LITTORAL BATTLESPACE

    Dr Howard Marsh

    Dr Howard Marsh, Chief Engineer, ‘Extending the Littoral Battlespace’ Advanced Technology Demonstration, Office of Naval Research

  • What is the ELB program and who are the organisations involved?
  • What were the aims and objectives of the exercise and were they achieved?
  • An analysis of the systems being utilised and tested
  • Developing multi-agent architectures - key issues considered
  • VH bandwidth capacity issues addressed - what difficulties does bandwidth pose for the NCW concept?
  • How did the ELB exercise highlight the three services’ C4I capabilities?
  • 10:40 NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE - THE SPAWAR PERSPECTIVE

    Tom Glabb

    Tom Glabb, Engineer, TSC Operations Branch, US Space and Naval Warfare Center (SPAWAR)

  • Current IT-21 installation/infrastructure
  • DII COE and its role in NCW
  • Security and information assurance
  • 11:15 Morning Coffee

    11:30 US NAVAL AIR C4I AND NETWORKED ARCHITECTURES

    Captain Bud Jewitt

    Captain Bud Jewitt, Director, Naval Aviation Interoperability Assurance Office, US Naval Air Systems Command

  • Use of the Joint Technical Architecture (JTA)
  • Aviation participation in Network Centric Warfare
  • NCW Requirements for the acquisition infrastructure
  • NCW testing and verification
  • Joint service collaboration in NCW
  • 12:10 ADVANCED UNDERSEA WARFARE CONCEPT

    Captain John Morgan

    Captain John Morgan, OPNAV ASW Officer, N-84, US Navy

  • Horizontal integration of existing C4I tools
  • Leverage industry standards, innovate and apply
  • Integrate-test-integrate
  • Affordable and achievable
  • At sea demo in 24 months
  • One cook in the kitchen
  • 12:50 Lunch

    14:00 OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION OF NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE

    Steven K Whitehead

    Steven K Whitehead, Technical Director, Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation Force, US Navy

  • The baseline of 'traditional' system level TandE
  • NCW system complexity
  • Mission level T and E
  • GCCS-M and CEC the notional models
  • Modeling and simulation in support of OT and E of NCW
  • 14:40 WEB TECHNOLOGY

    Sheldon B Gardner

    Sheldon B Gardner, Mission Development Branch, US Naval Research Laboratory

  • How can we best use commercial web technologies?
  • Will current web standards, such as CORBA, be useful?
  • Are there advantages in 3D virtual environments?
  • Will be web security standards support NCW?
  • How can legacy software be integrated into web NCW?
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE - A US INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE

    James Oberlin

    James Oberlin, Business Manager, CNI Systems, Marconi Aerospace

  • What technology must evolve to enable NCW?
  • Is procurement co-evolving with technology, organization and doctrine?
  • What is the impact of NCW on the DoD trend to procure COTS?
  • How must industry co-evolve to prosper from NCW?
  • 16:20 NAVAL SIMULATION SYSTEM

    Dr Bill Stevens

    Dr Bill Stevens, Vice President, Metron Inc

  • What are the major operational problems in this area?
  • Methodology/approach
  • Measures of Merit, MOEs, MOPs
  • Applications/future work
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Julian Nettlefold

    Julian Nettlefold, Editor, Battlespace

    9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS - FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN THE NAVAL C4I ARENA

    Captain Tony Clark

    Captain Tony Clark, Assistant Director, (C4I)/ DCIS (Navy), Ministry of Defence (UK)

  • What changes are foreseen in the employment of naval forces and what CIS challenges do these changes pose?
  • What part does a network centric approach play in meeting these challenges?
  • How will the Royal Navy approach developing architectures?
  • What part will current and legacy systems play?
  • How inhibiting will technical limitations (e.g.bandwidth) prove to be in practice?
  • 9:40 THE ALLIED IMPLICATIONS OF NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE

    Commander Eric Randall

    Commander Eric Randall, CIS Integration Manager, SHAPE

  • How does the NCW model relate to the development of NATO and Allied Forces?
  • Is the NCW model incorporated into existing NATO plans?
  • Can current procurement plans and cycles support a move towards a NCW model?
  • Can existing naval C4I technologies be integrated into future network centric systems?
  • How does the Common Operational Picture and the Global Command and Control System relate to NCW?
  • Does NCW provide the solution to future conflict scenarios?
  • 10:20 NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT ISSUES - THE CANADIAN PERSPECTIVE

    Paul Labbé, Senior Defense Scientist, Defense Research Establishment Valcartier

    Paul Labbé, Senior Defense Scientist, Defense Research Establishment Valcartier, , Dr Dale Blodgett, Senior Specialist, R and D, Lockheed Martin Canada

  • Information management
  • MOPs and MOEs
  • Systems architecting
  • Requirement specification and Information sharing
  • Command and control
  • Decision aids and communications
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SIMULATION IN FUTURE NAVAL SYSTEM PROCUREMENT

    Dr John Duncan

    Dr John Duncan, Head of Warship Simulation Based Design Programme, Ministry of Defence (Procurement Executive)

  • The role of virtual prototyping during future naval systems procurement
  • Some cost metrics and the verification and validation dilemma
  • UK project Vitesse - technology integration and evaluation
  • Simulation based design and virtual prototyping during early warship procurement phases - a NATO perspective
  • The NATO systems interoperability study
  • 12:00 NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE - C4I SYSTEMS OF SYSTEMS EVOLUTION - THE FRENCH PERSPECTIVE

    Rear-Admiral (Ret.) Jean-Luc Duval

    Rear-Admiral (Ret.) Jean-Luc Duval, Navy Counsellor, Matra Systemes and Information

  • What are the operational requirements? For France? For Europe?
  • How does the C4I community view the move towards NCW?
  • French defence industry perspective
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 THE IMPLICATIONS OF NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE (NCW) FOR US AND MULTI-NATIONAL OPERATIONS

    Commander Douglas MacDonald

    Commander Douglas MacDonald, Former Fellow, Strategic Research Department, US Naval War College

  • The need for and promise of NCW?
  • Evolution or revolution
  • Stumbling blocks and limitations
  • Impact of NCW on US national operations
  • Driving factors in allied and coalition operations
  • Impact of NCW on allied and coalition forces
  • 14:20 C4I ARCHITECHTURE ENGINEERING - UK INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE

    Claire Moss

    Claire Moss, Section Leader, Networks, Marconi Research Centre, Marconi Electronic Systems

  • An overview of the challenges facing European Industry in developing interoperable network architechtures
  • Addressing the issue of COTS against new developments in developing systems architechtures
  • Distributing and presenting raw/digitalised data from multiple sensors assessed
  • Compiling and presenting tactical air, surface and sub-surface systems - what are the issues to be considered?
  • Can the Navy effectively interoperate with the other armed forces? What are the C4I considerations for joint operations?
  • What are the lessons to be learned from other digitisation developments?
  • 15:00 EXTENDING THE LITTORAL BATTLESPACE - 'Component based technology on the beach'

    Tim Ward

    Tim Ward, ‘ELB’ Program Manager, Logica

  • Overview of the US’s ELB programme and Logica’s Demonstrator - Challenges of NCW and battlefield digitisation
  • Background in EUCLID RTP 6.1 - a major European military research programme on multi-agent architectures
  • CABLE, Logica’s multi-agent software development environment for creating distributed, mulit-threaded applications
  • Raising the level of abstraction using a metaphor of organisational management - Utilising emergent behaviour
  • Integration of: differing architectures; components developed by disparite parties; legacy systems
  • Support for distributed information management and display - Planning tools providing timeliness and reliability
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 NETWORK CENTRIC COMMAND AND CONTROL

    Professor Berndt Brehmer and Colonel Claes Sundin

    Professor Berndt Brehmer and Colonel Claes Sundin, , National Defence College, (FHS) (Sweden)

  • Increased information envisaged in NCW will not automatically lead to better C2
  • Achieving enhanced situational awareness and faster decisions
  • Ensuring flexibility, creativity and adaptivity for unknown command factors
  • ROLF - an examination of a new network centric command and control function and experience of the Mark 1
  • 16:30 NCW - INTEROPERABILITY AND STANDARDISATION

    Sandy Tyndale-Biscoe

    Sandy Tyndale-Biscoe, Principle Consultant, Open-IT

  • An examination of the organisational aspects of hard interoperability
  • An examination of the information management aspects of hard interoperability
  • The implication for these aspects as addressed by the ISO Reference Model of Open Distributed Processing (RM-ODP)
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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