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Unlike other events in the market place that only deal with individual air systems issues, this event aims to provide a comprehensive brief on all future air systems technologies. Attending this conference will enable you to analyse the recent developments related to Avionics, Cockpit Displays, Airborne Radars and Upgrade Technology. In addition, Helmet Mounted and Heads Up Displays will also be examined. The delegates from the other avionics conferences included representatives from the following companies and government bodies: · Alenia Marconi · Matra BAE Dynamics · BAE Systems · RAF · DaimlerChrysler Aerospace · MoD · Raytheon · DPA · Lockheed Martin · Thales · SAAB · DERA · Ericsson Microwave System · Daimler Benz Aerospace · Bofors Missiles · Rockwell Collins

As a senior industry executive, you will be aware of the opportunities available in this market. Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity to meet the key industry figures and discuss current and anticipated future developments

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Geoff Clarkson

Geoff Clarkson, Technical Leader Airborne systems, Sensors and Avionic Systems, DERA

9:10 BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF INTEGRATED AVIONICS

Lieutenant Colonel Glen Logan

Lieutenant Colonel Glen Logan, Deputy Director, Open Systems Joint Task Force, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense( Acquisition, Technology and Logistics)

  • Application of advanced avionics architectures to both legacy and new aircraft
  • Case studies (platform view): Mission computers. Navigation, displays, etc
  • Case studies (platform view): F-16, T-38, KC-135
  • Considerations in developing integrate versus federated architectures
  • How to insert technology into legacy aircraft
  • Impacts of applying an open systems approach
  • 9:40 US RESEARCH INTO COCKPIT DISPLAYS

    Dr Darrel Hopper

    Dr Darrel Hopper, Senior Electronics Engineer, Air Force Research Laboratory

  • Cockpits: Interfaces for time challenged decision makers
  • Optimal use of commercial industry to produce aerospace-military combat displays
  • Acquisition reform: Expression of display requirements in performance specifications
  • Production base (world-wide) for displays in military LRU’s (MFD, HUD, HMD, sim)

    Evolutionary technologies (AMLCD, TFEL/AMEL, DMD, LED, EM, CRT, miniature)

  • Revolutionary technologies (AMOLED, retinal, laser, microcavity, reflective, flexible)

    Near future: Waves of improvement (availability, sharpness, digital then more pixels)

    Far future: 230 million pixel immersive cockpit display

  • Aircraft cockpits and mission crewstation display requirements in aging vs. new systems

    Display technology road map for Future Air Systems

  • 10:20 FUTURE AIR SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY IMPLICATIONS FOR US AIR FORCE’S AGING AIRCRAFT PROGRAM

    Col Michael Carpenter

    Col Michael Carpenter, Chief, Aging Aircraft Planning Division, US Air Force

  • What is the aging aircraft program within the US Airforce?
  • The need for upgrade
  • Technologies used for upgrades of aging aircraft
  • Future developments for the US Air Force’s aging aircraft
  • Lessons learnt in development of aging aircraft
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 EUROFIGHTER COCKPIT AVIONICS

    Robin Sleight

    Robin Sleight, VP Customer Relations, BAE Systems

  • Unique features for Eurofighter displays
  • Helmet systems overview
  • Programme status and testing
  • Helmet systems-the future
  • 12:00 DEPLOYABLE FLIGHT RECORDERS

    Doug Stuart

    Doug Stuart, Managing Director, DRS Hadland

  • History of deployable systems
  • Activation and deployment
  • Recoverability and survivability
  • Dual combined recorder concept
  • New reasons for deployable application
  • Setting the standards for fixed and deployable combined recorder standards
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 MAN-MACHINE INTERFACE CONSIDERATIONS IN COCKPIT UPGRADES

    Kevin Allen

    Kevin Allen, Engineering Manager, Mason Electric

  • HOTAS(Hands On Stick and Throttle)
  • Grips, throttles, wheels and other control mechanisms
  • The importance of pilot input to the process
  • Case studies: · MIG- 21 · SU-25
  • 14:40 APPLICATION OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY TO AIRBORNE RADAR SYSTEMS

    Trevor Wright

    Trevor Wright, Project Manager-UAV Payloads, Astrium

  • Synthetic aperture radar heritage
  • Space programmes
  • Synergistic approach to airborne systems
  • Quasar –product description
  • Future technology flow
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TACTICAL FLIGHT SIMULATION

    Richard A Leland

    Richard A Leland, Director, Aeromedical Institute

  • What is Tactical Flight Simulation (TFS)
  • Development of TFS
  • Review of simulation technology
  • New generation simulator requirements
  • Applications for TFS
  • Projected benefits of TFS
  • 16:20 PANEL DISCUSSION

    17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Geoff Clarkson

    Geoff Clarkson, Technical Leader Airborne Systems , Sensors and Avionic Systems, DERA

    9:10 THE DEVELOPMENT OF HELMET DISPLAYS(HMDS) FOR ROTARY-WING AIRCRAFT

    Clarence E Rash

    Clarence E Rash, Research Physicist, US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory

  • Design considerations of HMDS
  • Lessons learned during development of HMDS
  • Twenty years of fielding of the Apache HMD
  • Future systems:Comanche and scanning laser HMDs
  • 9:40 INTEGRATED MODULAR AVIONICS IN DEMONSTRATORS AND AVIONIC SYSTEM UPGRADES

    Georg Angel

    Georg Angel, ISAAC Programme Manager, EADS Military Aircraft

  • Overview of the ASAAC Programme Status
  • Using the ASAAC concepts-what can be built today?
  • The ADT programme as an example
  • Why introduce ASAAC concepts in avionics systems upgrades now?
  • What remains to be done
  • First customers for the ASAAC standards in a German and European context- an outlook
  • 10:20 STRATEGIES FOR CIVIL COMPLIANCE ON THE MILITARY FLIGHT DECK

    Leo G. La Forge

    Leo G. La Forge, Manager Flight Deck Design and Integration Department, Rockwell Collins

  • Evolving Global air traffic management requirements
  • Open architectures to accommodate civil certification and military mission functionality
  • Case Studies - KC – 135 - C – 130 - Rotorcraft
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ADVANCED AIRCRAFT TECHNOLOGY

    Wayne Gagner

    Wayne Gagner, CEO, S&W Associates

  • US Requirements
  • Key programs
  • Technology
  • Worldwide operations
  • Advanced Air craft Operations

    Aircraft Operations

  • High Costs

    Summary

  • 12:00 MULTI FUNCTION DISPLAY SYSTEMS

    Hans Brandtberg

    Hans Brandtberg, Director Strategy and Technology Management, Display and, SaabTech

  • Challenges to meet today’s and tomorrow’s requirements for situational awareness effectiveness, pilot workload, flexibility, adaptability and affordability
  • Diffraction optics head up display
  • Three full colour multi function head down displays with flight data, multi-sensor and horizontal situation presentations
  • Display processor with computers, graphics, digital mapping and image processing
  • Integrated digital mission recording
  • Opportunities for future developments
  • 14:40 USE OF LAND/ NAVAL SENSORS

    David Money and Dr Peter Langsford

    David Money and Dr Peter Langsford, Chief Scientist and Future Technology Manager, , Alenia Marconi Systems, Radar Divison

  • The use of Land and Naval Radar Systems in Air Defence
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 AVIONICS UPGRADE CONSIDERATIONS

    Charles R Hurst

    Charles R Hurst, Director, Information Spectrum Inc

  • What are the implications of an Open Systems policy?
  • COTS in the military avionics world
  • What does performance vased imply?
  • Transforming acquistion plans into reality
  • The changing avionics support environment
  • 16:20 DEVELOPMENT OF SOLID STATE HELMET MOUNTED DISPLAYS (HMDS) FOR FIXED AND ROTARY WING AIRCRAFT

    Curt Casey

    Curt Casey, Business Development Director, Kaiser Electronics

  • Overview of current HMD activities
  • Impediments to user acceptance and acquisition
  • Developing an operation based approach to fielding HMD’s
  • Benefits and lifecycle cost savings
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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