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Fully explore the command and control implications of Network Centric Warfare…

· Revolutionise communications

· Increase your combat power

· Improve battlefield operations

The event will cover all this and much, much more. Register now to guarantee your place and to benefit from our speakers’ expertise.

By attending SMi’s 3rd Annual Network Centric Warfare conference, all your research and networking requirements can be completed in just two days! At SMi we appreciate that arranging to meet the people that matter takes up time and energy. But by attending this event, all your networking requirements for this market will be housed under one roof. And with lunches promoting open discussion, this will give you the vital time to discuss market developments and potential while exchanging industry specific knowledge.

Following the immense success of our previous Network Centric Warfare conferences, this year’s event will continue to expand on past strengths. This event will highlight the command and control implications and benefits of NCW.

In particular, the speakers will explore how centralised networks can be translated into combat power to provide real-time information superiority and operational benefits. The conference will enable you scrutinise the latest developments in, and benefits of, NCW in terms of revolutionising communications between sensors, shooters and decision makers. So, register now to benefit from: shared awareness, increased speed of command, greater lethality, increased survivability and high tempo operations.

The two-day conference will consist of presentations by key military professionals covering areas including:

· Enabling communication technologies

· Implementation and technical challenges

· Network centric networking

· Information superiority

· Architecture design, benefits and challenges

· Applications and simulation systems

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Jeff Cares

Jeff Cares, President, Alidade Consulting

9:10 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE

John Garstka

John Garstka, Chief Technology Officer The Joint Staff Directorate for C4 Systems, US DoD

  • Conceptual framework for NCW
  • Attributes and Metric for NCW
  • Emerging Evidence for the Power of NCW
  • NCW Implementation Strategy: The Way Ahead
  • 9:40 LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE U.S ARMY NATIONAL TRAINING ROTATION 2001

    Fred Stein

    Fred Stein, Department Manager - C3 Battlefield Networks PEO 3S, Mitre

  • Operational :

    · Collaboration

    · Fire Support

    · Maneuver

    · Close Air Support

  • Technical:

    · Network analysis

    · Data Base Issue

    · Support issues

  • 10:20 CURRENT VIEWS ON NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE

    Captain Tom Crowley

    Captain Tom Crowley, Director-Concept Development, Navy Warfare Development Command - US Navy

  • Capstone Concept
  • Navy Innovation Process
  • Insights form USN Fleet Battle Experiments
  • Navy after next
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE DEFINED

    Lcdr Richard Volkert

    Lcdr Richard Volkert, Project Leader for the Web-Centric Net (WeCAN), SPAWAR-US Navy

  • What is Network Centric Warfare? How does a net-centric capability develop, a case study
  • A methodology for maintaining information information superiority in a bandwidth-limited environment
  • What are the aims and objectives of Network Centric Warfare for Undersea Warfare?
  • What is its role and its relationship with C4I and C5ISR developments?
  • To what extent will COTS hardware and software make up future developments?
  • How does Network Centric Warfare address the issue of interoperability?
  • 12:00 AN APPROACH TO WEB ENABLED UNDERSEA WARFARE

    Jeniefer Benefield

    Jeniefer Benefield, President, Stargates

  • Web-disabled?
  • Results of a software capability implemented in undersea warfare(USW)
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 MODERN COMMAND AND CONTROL

    Lt Col Lex Bubbers

    Lt Col Lex Bubbers, RNLO/PO AtCCIS, Royal Netherlands Army

  • The operational concept explained
  • The implementation of the NCW concept
  • Experiences within the RNLA and AMF(L)
  • 14:40 COMMAND AND CONTROL IN THE NETWORK

    Professor Berndt Brehmer

    Professor Berndt Brehmer, Professor of Command and Control Decision Making, Swedish National Defence College

  • Increased information envisaged in NCW will not automatically lead to better C2
  • Achieving enhanced situational awareness and faster decisions - new forms of information presentation - new forms of making decisions - new forms of constructing and distributing orders - new ways of implementing thses orders to increase motivation and commitment
  • Ensuring flexibility, creativity and adaptivity for unknown command factors
  • ROLF – an examination of a new network centric command and control function and experience of the Mark 1
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVES ON NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE; PRAGMATIC APPROACHES WITH LIMITED RESOURCES

    Dr Bruce D. Fairlie

    Dr Bruce D. Fairlie, Consellor Defence Science, DSTO-Australian MOD

  • Recognising the need for better integration information oriented warfighting assets
  • Approaches towards affordable solutions for maximising the exploitation of networked assets
  • Conceptual development of network enabled warfare through the futures and force options work
  • Translation of the networked concepts into exploratory architectures and their testing using models that derive the warfighting value of integration
  • Methods for experimentation for network enabled warfare under the Defence Science and Technology Organisation's Takari Program
  • 16:20 MOBILE BROADBAND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS

    Dan Watt

    Dan Watt, Manager, Advanced Network Design Group, L-3 Communications

  • Introduction

    Network Centric Needs Key Communications Technology Enablers Network Centric Communications Overview

  • Network Configuration

    Formation Entry/Exit Maintability Survivability Authentication/Security

  • Mobile RF Network Considerations

    Frequency management Interference management Traffic load management Antenna configuration

  • Platform configuration

    Impact of platform variances(Air, ground, fixed, mobile)

  • Near term network centric warfare efforts
  • Summary
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    John Garstka

    John Garstka, Chief Technology Officer Directorate for C4 Systems The Joint Staff, US DoD

    9:10 INFORMATION AGE WARFARE DEFINED

    Jeff Cares

    Jeff Cares, President, Alidade Consulting

  • What has and has not changed in warfare?
  • What are the fundamentals of Information Age Warfare?
  • How have Network Centric Warfare concepts matured?
  • What are the challenges of developing such concepts?
  • How should forces prepare themselves to compete in Information Age Warfare?
  • 9:40 BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR: THE DANGERS OF FIGHTING A WAR WITH A NETWORKED MILITARY

    Dr Alfred Kaufman

    Dr Alfred Kaufman, Study Director, Institute for Defense Analyses

    10:20 OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION OF NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE

    Steven Whitehead

    Steven Whitehead, Technical Director-Commander Operational Test and Evaluation Force, US Navy

  • The baseline of “traditional” system level T&E
  • NCW system complexity
  • Mission level T&E
  • GCCS-M and CEC the notional models
  • Modeling and Simulation in support of OT&E of NCW
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 NETWORKED COMMUNICATIONS

    Claire Moss

    Claire Moss, Project Leader, Networks, BAE Systems

  • R&D developments for the internET protocol
  • Networked connectivity for mobile nodes
  • Performance metrics
  • Quality of service
  • 12:00 ENABLING NCW:

    Jeff Hornberger

    Jeff Hornberger, Senior Systems Engineer, EMC Corporation

  • Role of Technology in Warfare: Strategic, Operational and Tactical Technology
  • Key role of Information Technology (Infostructure)
  • Enterprise Storage - The Foundation of the Infostructure
  • Warfighting Benefits of Enterprise Storage
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT:

    Bill Millward

    Bill Millward, President and CEO, Applied Knowledge

  • Adaptability and it’s relationship to knowledge flowing and infrastructure
  • Information richness versus reach tradeoffs: need for new collaboration methods
  • Operational efficiency and innovation tradeoffs: decision-making is key
  • The knowledge generated ‘net-effect’
  • 14:40 THE ROLE OF COLLABORATIVE MISSION PLANNING IN NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE

    Sheldon B. Gardner

    Sheldon B. Gardner, Project Manager, Naval Research Laboratory

  • Collaborative Mission Planning for Joint/Coalition Campaign Battle Management
  • Object oriented process and product models for sharing of information
  • Intelligent Agents for integration and controlof legacy resources
  • Dynamic reconfiguration for bandwidth optimization
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NETCENTRIC WARFARE-ARCHITECTURES AND ACQUISITION

    Phil Wallace

    Phil Wallace, Group Leader, Senior Engineer, CSCI

  • A unique process which considers legacy systems, Alliances, affordability and interdependencies of crosswarfare capabilities to implement the most cost effective approach to achieving a Battle Force Capability in a multi mission environment
  • 16:20 BATTLEFORCE INFORMATION NETWORKING

    Kirsch Jones

    Kirsch Jones, Research Principal-Command and Control System Engineering, Lockheed Martin

  • Speed and complexity of battle and value of rapid coordinated effects are increased
  • Well co-ordinated multi platform mission execution relies on Common Operational Picture (contextual information, missions and constraints) and Coherent Tactical Picture(current environmental and target data synthesised from force sensors)
  • Mission system components can determine method of more effective mission success
  • Evolved technology allows mission system networking objectives and information exploitation for effective theater wide warfare to improve mission effectiveness and enable new mission capabilities
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    The Fundamentals of Warfare in the Information Age
    Workshop

    The Fundamentals of Warfare in the Information Age

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    12th September 2001
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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