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This is the Fourth Annual Future Surface Warships conference and will examine the next generation of surface warships in relation to policy, technology and required capability. Future Warships 2003 will specifically look at individual naval requirements, objectives and the programmes implemented to meet the capability required for future operations. This conference should provide delegates with a comprehensive overview of future and current warship programme, country requirements for future operations, structural and design challenges, technology capabilities and future technological requirements to build a next generation of survivable, easily deployable ships.

Technology has driven the size, ability to execute assigned missions, and which platforms are designated to carry the Navy into battle. Decisions have impacted history greatly, and will likely continue to. The cost of state-of-the-art naval weapons systems and platforms has grown. The size of the Navy has shrunk. Parochialism must give way to unemotional logical thinking. The Navy must continue to advance with technology. The cost of not doing so will be far greater

Warships of the future will have electrically powered propulsion systems, auxiliary systems, launchers, sensors, countermeasures, and high power weapons. These, coupled with low self-signatures, will permit detection and engagement of the enemy far outside the envelope for counterattack.

Benefits of Attending:
MEET 30 leading experts of Future Surface Warships from all over the world
IDENTIFY key issues of Future Surface Warships all over the world
HEAR about the UK electric ship’s electric propulsion
ACQUIRE knowledge of the latest achievements within Future Surface Warship programmes
DISCOVER the wide range of country specific Future Warship concepts
GAIN an invaluable insight into early ship design, stealth, electric propulsion and high speed technology of Future Surface Warships

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
Commander Xavier Baudouard, Head of Future Surface Combatant Planing, French Navy
Lieutenant Commander Matt Bolton, Technical Manager, Marine Systems Development Office, Ministry of Defence, UK
Captain William Luebke, Deputy Director, Naval Sea Systems Command – Future Concepts and Surface Ship Design
Captain Thomas J Strei, Deputy, Open Architecture, Program Executive Office, Integrated Warfare Systems, Naval Sea Systems Command
James Webster, X-Craft Ship Design Manager, Office of Naval Research
Dave Clayton, Division Director, Total Ship Power, Naval Surface Warfare Centre
Tony Jones, Deputy IPT Leader, Assistant Director Warship Integration, Defence Procurement Agency
Bas Dunnebier, Programme Manager, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory
Dr David Wyllie, Chief, Maritime Platforms Division, DSTO
Professor David Andrews, Professor of Engineering Design, University College London

“As an MoD representative the key benefit was achieving a greater understanding of the other national programmes and issues”
Commander Chris Richards, EC(AWB)1, Directorate of Equipment Capability, Ministry of Defence, UK

“A very well given conference giving excellent presentations on a varied spectrum of topics”
David Lewis, Senior Principal Systems Engineer, Forward Decision Group, BAE SYSTEMS

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor David Andrews

Professor David Andrews, Professor of Engineering Design, University College London

9:10 FUTURE SHIPS

  • Overview
  • Current ship design concepts
  • Design challenges for the next Navy
  • Future force formulation process
  • Howard Fireman

    Howard Fireman, Director, Naval Sea Systems Command – Future Concepts and Surface Ship Design

    Captain William Luebke

    Captain William Luebke, Deputy Director, Naval Sea Systems Command – Future Concepts and Surface Ship Design

    9:50 STEALTH IN FUTURE SURFACE WARSHIP DESIGN

    Bas Dunnebier

    Bas Dunnebier, Program Manager, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory

  • The use of frequency selective surfaces
  • Operational relevance
  • Balancing requirements
  • 10:20 FUTURE WARSHIPS – FUTURE ELECTRIC PROPULSION CHALLENGES

  • Future propulsion power requirements
  • IEP vs IFEP
  • Future development potential
  • Technology availability
  • Technology de-risking
  • Lieutenant Commander Matt Bolton

    Lieutenant Commander Matt Bolton, Technical Manager, Marine Systems Development Office, Ministry of Defence, United Kingdom

    Jeff Buckley

    Jeff Buckley, Naval Business Manager, Future Systems, ALSTOM

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 US ELECTRIC SHIP

  • Technology for the electric ship
  • Programmes supporting the electric ship
  • Evolution of the electric ship
  • Dave Clayton

    Dave Clayton, Division Director, Total Ship Power, Naval Surface Warfare Centre

    John Sofia

    John Sofia, Deputy Director Machinery Technology, Naval Surface Warfare Centre Carderock Division Philadelphia

    12:00 PROPULSION

    David J Bricknell

    David J Bricknell, Vice President Systems, Naval, Ka Me Wa, Rolls-Royce

  • Increasing speed for many types of naval ships
  • Waterjets and gas turbines increasingly used in fast attack craft
  • High-speed but flexible propulsion systems for the new generation of Littoral Surface Combatants
  • Fast logistics ships require long range with large payloads
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 FUTURE WARSHIPS DESIGN

    Chris Ross

    Chris Ross, Chief Naval Architect, QinetiQ Centre for Marine Technology

  • History of the research vessel Triton
  • Test results of the research vessel Triton
  • Development of future high-speed trimaran warships
  • Risk reduction through triple-hull warship design
  • Potential replacement for Type 22/23 figates in RN future surface combatant or in US Navy Littoral Combatant Ship programmes
  • High-speed mobile and flexible warships designs for the future
  • 14:40 RESEARCH ILLUSTRATION OF THE TRIMARAN

  • Importance of roll damping for trimaran warships
  • Methods of providing roll damping on a trimaran ship
  • Optimisation of damping devices to gain best advantage of the trimaran hullform
  • Model test results and benefits of future integration into trimaran warship designs
  • Tom Grafton

    Tom Grafton, PhD Researcher, University College London

    Professor Simon Rusling

    Professor Simon Rusling, Professor of Naval Architecture, University College London

    15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CASE STUDY

  • RN policy and drivers for waste management in warships
  • Research and development towards waste management solutions – overview
  • Outcome of research and development programme
  • Implications of future platforms and in-service units
  • Lieutenant Commander Stephen Blackburn

    Lieutenant Commander Stephen Blackburn, Head of Maritime Waste Management Equipment, Royal Navy, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Sarah Kenny

    Sarah Kenny, Project Manager, QinetiQ

    16:20 SUSTAINABLE SURFACE COMBATANTS

    Dr Chris Edmonds

    Dr Chris Edmonds, Strategic Business Development Manager, DML, Devonport Royal Dockyard

  • Supportability
  • Reach
  • Capability
  • Affordability
  • …on the Corvette/Frigate boundary
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Neville Brown

    Professor Neville Brown, Professor of International Security, Mansfield College, Oxford

    9:10 VISION FOR THE US NAVY OPEN ARCHITECTURE

    Captain Thomas J Strei

    Captain Thomas J Strei, Deputy, Open Architecture, Program Executive Office, Integrated Warfare Systems, Naval Sea Systems Command

  • DD(X)
  • LCS
  • AEGIS
  • 9:40 DD (X) – LITTORAL COMBATANT

    Trish Hamburger

    Trish Hamburger, Human Systems Integration Director, NAVSEA PEO Integrated Warfare Systems

  • HSI impacts for new ship classes: DDX, LCS, CVN21
  • Human computer interface technologies / display way ahead
  • Total ship training / quality of life
  • Manpower optimisation / modernisation efforts
  • Acquisition processes: NAVSEA HSI Directorate
  • 10:20 US NAVY X-CRAFT

    James Webster

    James Webster, X-Craft Ship Design Manager, Office of Naval Research

  • X-Craft: an experimental platform to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, structural behaviour and propulsion system
  • High speed catamaran for open ocean
  • Risk management programme addressing non-linear ship dynamic behaviour
  • Results of full scale experiment to provide basis for certification of the vessel’s safety
  • Mission modularity and underway stern launch and recovery technology demonstration systems
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 TYPE 45

  • Maritime warfare and the Royal Navy needs
  • A capable and versatile warship
  • Integrated electrical propulsion
  • In production
  • Tony Jones

    Tony Jones, Deputy IPT Leader, Assistant Director Warship Integration, Defence Procurement Agency

    Chris Lloyd

    Chris Lloyd, Chief Engineer, Type 45 Destroyer, BAE SYSTEMS

    12:00 LITHIUM ION NAVAL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Hugues Eudeline

    Hugues Eudeline , Head of Dauphin Development, SAFT

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 THE FRENCH FUTURE SURFACE COMBATANT

    Commander Xavier Baudouard

    Commander Xavier Baudouard, Head of Future Surface Combatant Planing, French Navy

  • The new French multimission frigate programme
  • Founded on a revolutionary triptych
  • Specifications: modular design, small crew and high availability
  • Supply on demand
  • 14:20 THE GREEK CORVETTE

  • Hellenic Navy general requirements
  • Evolution of the requirements
  • Technological limitations and considerations
  • Final selection
  • Yiannis Tavoulari

    Yiannis Tavoulari, Vice President, Elefsis Shipbuilding and Industrial Enterprises

    Les Brown

    Les Brown, Project Co-ordinator, Vosper Thornycroft Shipbuilding International

    15:00 NEXT GENERATION OF SWEDISH SURFACE COMBATANT

    Captain Odd Werin

    Captain Odd Werin, Head of Naval Forces Development Department, Swedish Armed Forces, Headquarters, Joint Forces Development

  • A vision of extreme littoral warfare Swedish naval capabilities
  • Requirements
  • Concepts
  • Way ahead
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 MODULAR CONCEPT FOR WARSHIPS

    Captain Arne Stihoej Pedersen

    Captain Arne Stihoej Pedersen, Managing Director, Naval Team Denmark

  • Development of the modular concept for the last 15 years
  • Practical applications of the modular concept
  • New multirole vessel and patrolship
  • 16:40 AUSTRALIAN FUTURE SHIPS

    Dr David Wyllie

    Dr David Wyllie, Chief, Maritime Platforms Division, DSTO

  • Multi-hulls
  • Composites
  • Smart Sensors
  • Vulnerability
  • 17:20 GERMAN FRIGATE FOR THE FUTURE

    Wolfgang Bohlayer

    Wolfgang Bohlayer, Division Manager, Forward Planning, Blohm & Voss

  • Further development in electric propulsion
  • Modified multifunctional platforms
  • Unconventional monohull design
  • Enhanced concept on survivability –Two Island concept
  • 18:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Selecting the Right Standards for Effective Procurement
    Workshop

    Selecting the Right Standards for Effective Procurement

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel
    26th September 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

    Harrington Gardens
    London SW7 4LH
    United Kingdom

    Millennium Gloucester Hotel

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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