Home
overview
Attending SMi’s Second Annual Future Surface Warships conference will enable you to gain a comprehensive insight into the latest international initiatives, requirements and opportunities related to this increasingly important area of naval warfare.

Following on from the success of the last year’s event, this year’s presentations and case studies will look at the warships of the future, covering all relevant main areas such as procurement, design, ship types, operating roles and the equipment they will carry. The presentations and case studies will also cover following issues:

  • ELECTRONIC WARFARE
  • FUTURE U.S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER CONCEPTS - APPLICATION OF
  • TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CHALLENGES FACING AIRCRAFT CARRIERS IN THE 21ST CENTURY
  • THE TYPE 45 AAW DESTROYER – PRESENT AND FUTURE CAPABILITY
  • THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW F –100 & F-310 FRIGATES

SMi is proud to announce that we have assembled the key military and industry figures in this field to tackle the critical issues related to future surface warfare. In particular, I would like to highlight the following speakers:

  • Rear Admiral Roland Knapp, Programme Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers, U.S. Navy
  • Captain Steve Chick, Deputy Director, Above Water Battlespace, Ministry of Defence
  • Peter M Czerniewski, Program Director, Type 45 Combat Systems, BAE SYSTEMS
  • Bruce Gamble, Director of Engineering, EMG, American Superconductor
  • Dr Cyril F Krolick, Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer, Syntek Technologies
  • Mr Jose Maria Herranz, F-100 Program Manager, IZAR ( Ferrol Shipyard)

The high quality of our speakers ensures that attendance at this key industry event will enable you to stay one step ahead of your competitors. Furthermore, you will be able to meet the sector’s key figures and discuss current and anticipated future developments. It’s an event you can’t afford to miss.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Eric Grove

Dr Eric Grove, Director, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

9:10 THE 21ST CENTURY WARSHIP REQUIREMENTS: THE UK NAVAL CAPABILITIES

Captain Steve Chick

Captain Steve Chick, Deputy Director, Above Water Battlesapce, Ministry of Defence

  • The involvement of classification societies
  • Levels of survivability and shock protection
  • Future propulsion options
  • Unconventional hull designs
  • Tendencies towards the multi-purpose warship
  • 9:40 FUTURE U.S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER CONCEPTS-APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CHALLENGES FACING AIRCRAFT CARRIERS IN THE 21ST CENTURY

    Rear Admiral Roland Knapp

    Rear Admiral Roland Knapp, Programme Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers, US Navy

  • Challenges to Aircraft Carriers in the 21st Century
    Embracing Network Centric Warfare Concepts
  • Establishing survivability goals
  • The Impetus for Change
  • Reducing Total Ownership Costs
    Meeting the Challenge
  • Leveraging Technology across the force
    Enhancing Survivability through Innovation and Technology Insertion
  • Evolutionary approach to Future Carriers Design
  • 10:20 THE FUTURE ROLE OF THE NORWEGIAN NAVY

    Rear Admiral Jan Jaeger, Commander

    Rear Admiral Jan Jaeger, Commander, Royal Norwegian Navy Materiel Command, NAVMATCOMNOR

  • The procurement program- comprehensive structural changes
  • The construction of the new frigates
  • International operations and co-operation
  • Advanced surface warships- the way ahead
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 FUTURE OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS: THE FRENCH PERSPECTIVE

    Captain Thierry Rousseau

    Captain Thierry Rousseau, Branch Chief Plans and Policy, French Navy

  • The ‘loi de programmation’
  • Today’s fleet capabilities
  • Forward strategies
  • 12:00 THE TYPE 45 AAW DESTROYER

    Peter M Czerniewski

    Peter M Czerniewski, Program Director, Type 45 Combat System, BAE Systems

  • The primary AAW role- local and area defence
  • A powerful multi-function radar and super-agile manoeuvring missiles
  • Operational capability - a versatile warship
  • Flexible, adaptable design - the key to future capability
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 SHIPBOARD SYSTEMS - THE MULTI ROLE VESSELS

    Captain Poul Groos, RDN

    Captain Poul Groos, RDN, Managing Director, Naval Team Denmark

  • System integration capability and service life maintenance
  • Separate, sub- and integrated systems
  • The Standard Flex Concept
  • Interface definition handling techniques
  • Refit schemes for older vessels
  • 14:40 CYCLOIDAL RUDDER AND SCREW PROPELLER FOR VERY MANOUVERABLE COMBATANT

    Torsten Moltrecht

    Torsten Moltrecht, Naval Architect, Voith Schiffstechnik

  • Maximum manouverablilty, low resistance, take home capability
  • High shock resistance, low magnetic signature, low radiated noise levels
  • Role stabilisation during stand still of vessel
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NAVAL WARSHIP PRIME CONTRACTING

    Rear Admiral John Trewby

    Rear Admiral John Trewby, Naval Adviser, BAE Systems

  • Aerospace model
  • Business model
  • The correct approach
  • Industries challenge
  • Examples, Type 45, Astute
  • 16:20 FUTURE OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS: THE CANADIAN PROSPECTIVE

    Dr Paul T Mitchell

    Dr Paul T Mitchell, Director of Academics, Canadian Forces College

  • Developments of naval defence capabilities in Canada
  • Maritime Forces and Peace Support Operations
  • Current thinking on interoperability with the alliance and coalition partners
  • Providing a gateway C4ISR function in alliance and coalition operations
  • Future developments
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Paul T. Mitchell

    Dr Paul T. Mitchell, Director of Academics, Canadian Forces College

    9:10 THE F -100 AND F-310: NEW FRIGATES FOR EUROPE

    Jose Maria Herranz

    Jose Maria Herranz, F-100 Program Manager, IZAR (Ferrol Shipyard)

  • IZAR Ferrol capabilities
  • The F-100 frigate. Program status. Platform and combat system performance
  • Survivability aspects
  • The F-301 frigate. Program status, design methodology. Platform and combat system performance. Survivability aspects.
  • Common characteristics. Future designs
  • 9:40 FUTURE SHIP ELECTRIC PROPULSION

    Bruce Gamble

    Bruce Gamble, Director of Engineering, EMG, American Superconductor Corporation

  • The benefits of High HP Superconducting motors for naval propulsion
  • High temperature superconductors for power generation
  • Magnets
  • 10:20 NAVAL SURFACE MODELLING AND SIMULATION

    Per H Bremming

    Per H Bremming, Senior Reserve Officer, Head of Systems Modelling Department, Systems Technology Division, FOI

  • Tools for Naval Modelling and Simulation
  • Examples/Demonstration of Naval Surface Modelling and Simulation
  • Discussions on Naval Modelling and Simulation
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 WHAT THE NAVY WANTS TO PROCURE

    Frederick Phillippi

    Frederick Phillippi, Land Attack Group Manager, DTI Associates

  • DDG51 AEGIS
  • CG AEGIS Cruiser Conversions
  • DD21
  • What SECDEF Defence Review says to procure
  • What other navies are procuring
  • Can a nation expect help from other nations in a conflict
  • 12:00 THE NEW GENERATION OF AUTOMATED WARSHIPS

    Dr Cyril F Krolick

    Dr Cyril F Krolick, Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer, Syntek Technologies

  • Continued functioning of weapons by rerouting power
  • Modular vessels with several redundant sections
  • Counteracting instabilities by semiconductor converters
  • New mathematical testing techniques
  • Stable designs over all operating conditions
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 THE ROLE OF SURVIVABILITY ANALYSIS IN WARSHIP DESIGN

    Dr. Raymond P. Daddazio

    Dr. Raymond P. Daddazio, PE, Director, Applied Science Division, Weidlinger Associates

  • Current exploration and modelling techniques
  • Naval architecture exploration
  • Software integration with expert analyses
  • From concept to disposal
  • The benefit of these tools
  • Future developments
  • 14:20 INTEGRATED COMMAND ENVIRONMENT-WARFIGHTER-CENTERED DESIGN

    Trish Hamburger

    Trish Hamburger, DD21/ONR Manning Affordability Program Manager, Office of Naval Research/NAVSEA Dahlgren

  • Integrated and interoperable design approach
  • Reduce crew work load by knowledge vice data
  • Manpower reduction technology and concept initiatives
  • Integrated Command Environment
  • Changes in training, recruiting and career progression
  • 15:00 THE 21ST CENTURY WARSHIP REQUIREMENTS

    Charles Nisbet

    Charles Nisbet, Technical Manager, BAE SYSTEMS

  • The involvement of classification societies
  • Levels of survivability and shock protection
  • Future propulsion options
  • Unconventional hull designs
  • Tendencies towards the multi-purpose warship
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 ADVANCES IN WARSHIP DESIGN SOFTWARE TOOLS

    Adam M. Askew

    Adam M. Askew, Managing Director, GRC

  • Configuration Management
  • Export Domain Integration
  • Fine tuning at Initial design
  • COTS, GOTS or SOUPS
  • The economics of developement
  • 16:40 RADAR CROSS SECTION SIMULATION SOFTWARE

    Gert Lingquist

    Gert Lingquist, Managing Director, CSS Denmark

  • Precise identification of radar reflecting areas
  • Continuous stealth assessment of ships
  • Exceptional accuracy
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.