Home
overview
This conference will examine the next generation of surface warships in relation to policy, technology and required capability. Future Warships will look specifically at individual naval requirements, objectives and programmes to meet the capability required for future operations in deep, coastal and littoral waters.
Sessions include:

  • Learning from the UK's IPT Team strategies and policies for warship design and development
  • How major programmes like USN DD(X) will fit within the fleet's sea shield and sea strike roles
  • Options for replacement of Royal Navy's Type 22/23 frigates
  • Latest developments in high speed warships
  • New multi-role vessel and patrol ships


  • Plus, special focus on:

  • How to reduce the vulnerability of future warships
  • Overcoming emerging threats from torpedoes, fast attack craft, mines, and anti ship missiles
  • Design next generation ship survivability systems
  • How to design shock, blast, frag and direct hit protection systems
  • Improvement of survivability in the littoral arena
  • Assessment of the latest radar and sensor suites available
  • How to detect stealthy and small air targets
  • Assessment of the affordability of future warfare systems
  • Reduction of the total cost of ownership
  • Meeting the requirements of future integrated weapon systems
  • Development of low cost naval sensor systems
  • How to assess the latest developments in naval combat management systems
  • Integration of new human-computer interface technologies
  • How to integrate the latest diesel and electric propulsion systems


  • Plus keynote presentations:

    US Navy updates on the DD(X), LCS and CVN (X) Programmes
    US Navy briefing on overcoming the challenges of highly variable and reconfigurable shipboard systems
    UK MoD update on the future requirements for the Royal Navy surface fleet
    Case study on UK's FSC platform options and RV Triton
    UK MoD update on the Type 45 destroyer
    QinetiQ briefing on multi-form hulls and next generation platforms
    UK MoD briefing on littoral threat reduction
    Qinetiq briefing on overcoming warship vulnerabilities
    Danish design briefing on modular concepts for warship design

    Speaker Panel:

  • Captain David Adler, DD(X) Section Head, US Navy
  • Matt Roberts, Type 45 Integrated Project Team Leader, Defence Procurement Agency, UK Ministry of Defence
  • Commander Chris Ayres, FSC Requirements Manager, Future Surface Combatant IPT, Defence Procurement Agency, UK Ministry of Defence
  • David Manley, Vulnerability Reduction Project Officer, Sea Technology Group, UK Ministry of Defence
  • Lieutenant Commander Matt Bolton, Technical Manager, Marine Systems Development Office, UK Ministry of Defence
  • Captain Arne Stihoj Pedersen, Managing Director, Naval Team Denmark
  • Douglas Wright, Technology Chief, Whole Warship Vulnerability Assessment, QinetiQ
  • Andrew Bailey, Business Development Director, Maritime Systems, QinetiQ
  • Bas Dunnebier, Department Head, Networked Embedded Systems, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory
  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Eric Grove

    Dr Eric Grove, Director, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

    9:10 OPENING PRESENTATION

    Dr Eric Grove

    Dr Eric Grove, Director, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

  • A most favourable strategic environment
  • The creation of strategic effect ashore
  • Power projection versus sea control
  • Network enabled capability and the challenge to the submarine
  • Network enabled capability and the challenge to the submarine
  • 9:50 THE UK’S FUTURE SURFACE COMBATANT

    Commander Chris Ayres

    Commander Chris Ayres, FSC Requirements Manager, Future Surface Combatant IPT, Defence Procurement Agency, UK Ministry of Defence

  • Establishing future requirements for the RN surface escort fleet
  • The IPT strategy towards policy, development, risk-reduction and initial design
  • The platform options open to the IPT for the final FSC design
  • Present intentions with regard to an acquisition strategy
  • Next steps in development
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 NAVAL DOMINANCE

    Captain David Adler

    Captain David Adler, DD(X)/CG(X) Section Head, US Navy

  • The present status of the DD(X) program
  • Innovations and systems
  • The need to dominate the battlespace and how DD(X) will achieve this
  • above water
  • underwater
  • in the air
  • on land
  • DD(X)’s place in the future US fleet as an integral part of
  • Sea Shield
  • Sea Strike
  • 11:40 FUTURE WARSHIP DESIGNS

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 VULNERABILITY OF FUTURE WARSHIPS

    Douglas Wright

    Douglas Wright, Technology Chief, Whole Warship Vulnerability Assessment, QinetiQ

  • The threat - torpedoes, proliferation of submarines and the re-emergence of fast attack craft - mines - anti-ship missiles
  • Destructive power of warheads against modern warships
  • Survivable systems - protection against shock - protection against blast, fragmentation and direct hit - combat system redundancy - distribution services redundancy
  • 14:30 VULNERABILITY REDUCTION FOR FUTURE WARSHIPS

    15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 RADAR AND SENSOR SUITES

    Willim de Vires

    Willim de Vires, Requirements Analysis and System Design Manager, Thales Naval Nederland

  • The implications of littoral operations - Stealth/small air target detection requirements and associated low false alarms - Adequate defence systems for threats up to saturation level - Surface surveillance including asymmetric warfare aspects - Affordable systems with 3D volume search radar, MFR and IRST - Automated operation with multiple hypothesis based decisions
  • Additional, future operations require: - Graceful degradation and reduced manning - Remote monitoring and easy maintenance - Low cost of ownership
  • Examples of radar and sensor suites
  • 16:20 THE INTEGRATED MAST AND ITS ROLE IN FUTURE ADVANCED TOPSIDE DESIGN

  • Definition of an integrated mast
  • Historical development of the integrated mast concept
  • The status of mast technology today
  • The benefits of advanced topsides
  • The future of stealth development on marine platforms
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Eric Grove

    Dr Eric Grove, Director, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

    9:10 INTRODUCING INNOVATIONS INTO THE ROYAL NAVY

  • Overview of the CONOPS of the Type 45
  • The integral weapon system - PAAMS - SAMPSON - the combat management system
  • Innovations for the Royal Navy - electric propulsion - improved crew accommodation - designed according to Lloyd’s Register rules
  • David Downs

    David Downs, Chief Engineer, BAE Systems

    9:50 FUTURE DANISH NAVAL CAPABILITIES FOR WARSHIPS

    Captain Arne Stihoej Pedersen

    Captain Arne Stihoej Pedersen, Managing Director, Naval Team Denmark

  • Development of the modular concept for the last 15 years
  • Practical applications of the modular concept
  • New multi-role vessel and patrol ship
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 DD(X) – LITTORAL COMBATANT

    Patricia Hamburger

    Patricia Hamburger, PEO IWS HSI Program Manager, NAVSEA Dahlgren Division, US Navy

  • HSI impacts for new ship classes: DD(X), LCS, CVN(X)
  • Human computer interface technologies display way ahead
  • Total ship training/quality of life
  • Manpower optimisation and modernisation efforts
  • Acquisition process: NAVSEA HSI Directorate
  • Next generation watchstations
    SEA Warrior and SEAPRINT
  • 11:40 LOW COST SENSOR NETWORKS

    Bas Dunnebier

    Bas Dunnebier, Department Head, Networked Embedded Systems, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory

  • Warfare
  • Situational awareness
  • Cost reduction
  • Defence against terrorism
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 DESIGN OF NEXT GENERATION WARSHIP POWER AND AUTOMATION SYSTEMS

  • Highly variable and reconfigurable shipboard systems
  • Application of robust control techniques to shipboard systems
  • Distributed, real time survivable automation technologies to enable reduced workload aboard warships.
  • Innovative design techniques to facilitate exploitation of survivable systems
  • Katherine Drew

    Katherine Drew, Program Officer, Ship Hull, Mechanical and Electrical Division, Office of Naval Research, US Navy

    14:30 DIESEL PROPULSION

    Michael Baumann

    Michael Baumann, Senior Manager, Sales, Naval Propulsion Systems, MTU Freidrichshafen

  • Types of naval vessel
  • Different concepts of propulsion systems
  • Selection criteria and comparison
  • Conclusion
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 LITHIUM ION NAVAL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Hugues Eudeline

    Hugues Eudeline , Head of Dauphin Development, SAFT

  • Li ion versatility
  • Impacts on naval architecture
  • Programme status
  • Safety issues
  • 16:20 COST EFFECTIVENESS IN SHIP SURVIVABILITY

  • Considerations regarding the arrangement and construction aspects of surface combatants, for their rational design, building and operation
  • Experience based on the design and building of the De Zeven Provincien class
  • Design principles for the future: the Ship Integrated Geometric Modularity Approach design principle as applied to surface combatants
  • Bob van de Graaf

    Bob van de Graaf, Co-ordinator, Research and Development, Schelde Naval Shipbuilding

    Leon Goossens

    Leon Goossens, Product Manager, Combatants & Patrol Vessels, Schelde Naval Shipbuilding

    17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.