Home
overview
Geospatial intelligence, the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and illustrate geographically referenced features and activities on the Earth in support of national security needs. Geospatial intelligence is driving fundamental changes at every level of national and international security: doctrine, infrastructure, training and personnel development, operational planning and execution, and facility management.

SMi’s Inaugural Geospatial Intelligence conference will assess how geospatial intelligence contributes to overall force information gathering and its role in transforming defence capabilities in support of the future warfighter.

International intelligence frameworks will be examined, focusing on how geospatial intelligence is being implemented into future operational strategy and force transformation. The importance of developing and establishing standards for GIS will be discussed with a view to understanding the means by which Geospatial Intelligence requirements can be met.

Other important issues being discussed include the key challenges in interoperability, evolving data and image collection technologies and the role of non-military bodies within geospatial intelligence gathering. Wider applications will be evaluated including the impact of geospatial intelligence within Homeland Security, the latest Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and technologies, and how these systems can be integrated and implemented into your organisation’s infrastructure.

The outstanding international speaker panel includes:
  • Brigadier General Pierluigi Campregher, Deputy Director, Italian Intelligence and Security Services (SISMI)
  • Brigadier Nicholas Rigby, Director, Defence Intelligence Joint Environment (DIJE), Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Karen Irby, Director, National Center for Geospatial Intelligence Standards (NCGIS), National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)
  • Brian Routledge, Deputy Director, European Union Satellite Centre (EUSC)
  • Olaf Østensen, Chairman, ISO/TC 211 Geographic Information/Geomatics, Norwegian Mapping Authority
  • Assistant Chief Constable Nick Tofiluk, Intelligence, West Midlands Police
  • Major Soenke Fischhoefer, SO2 Geo Ops and Policy, J2, NATO SHAPE
  • Major John Tate, Senior Instructor, Terrain Analysis, Royal School of Military Survey, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Karen Siderelis, Associate Director, Geospatial Information and Chief Information Officer, US Geological Survey
  • Dr Mark Doherty, Head, Exploitation and Services Division/Science and Applications Department, Earth Observation Programmes Directorate, European Space Agency (ESA)
  • Ruth Adams, Head, Additional Military Layers, UK Hydrographic Office
  • Sam Bacharach, Executive Director, Outreach, Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
  • Chris Lorenz, Senior Space Engineering Manager, Security and Intelligence, Canadian Space Agency / Government Liaison Office (Ottawa) CSA/DND Directorate of Space Development 15ST*

Benefits of Attending Geospatial Intelligence include:

  • ENHANCE your understanding of Geospatial Intelligence and its role in national and international security
  • EXPLORE the contributions of non-military bodies to homeland security and military intelligence
  • IDENTIFY the key challenges in integrating Geospatial Intelligence into existing frameworks and the importance of developing and establishing standards
  • EVALUATE the role of Geospatial Intelligence in future military operational strategy and force transformation
  • DEVELOP your knowledge on the key advances within Geospatial Intelligence Systems and data collection technologies

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett

Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett, Principal Consultant, The Salamander Organization

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Air Vice-Marshal Stuart Peach CBE

Air Vice-Marshal Stuart Peach CBE, Director General, Intelligence Collection, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Reasons for change
  • Identifying the new intelligence requirements
  • How defence requirements, policy and guidance are now met and how they will be delivered in the future
  • Developing synergies
  • 9:50 THE CONTRIBUTION OF GEOSPATIAL INTELLIGENCE TO HOMELAND SECURITY

    Brigadier General Pierluigi Campregher

    Brigadier General Pierluigi Campregher, Deputy Director, Italian Intelligence And Security Services (SISMI)

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 THE ROLE OF THE EU SATELLITE CENTRE IN EUROPEAN INTELLIGENCE

    Brian Routledge

    Brian Routledge, Deputy Director, European Union Satellite Centre (EUSC)

  • An overview of EUSC capabilities
  • The role of EUSC in European intelligence frameworks
  • Assuring interoperability
  • Ability to support international mission
  • EU geospatial policy
  • 11:30 THE ROLE OF THE CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY IN NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL INTELLIGENCE

    Chris Lorenz

    Chris Lorenz, Senior Space Engineering Manager, Security and Intelligence, Canadian Space Agency/Government Liaison Office (Ottawa) CSA/DND Directorate of Space Development 15ST*

  • Canadian geospatial policy (history, legislation, etc)
  • Overview of CSA's capabilities (present and planned)
  • Role of the CSA in national/international intelligence frameworks
  • Assuring interoperability
  • 12:10 US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    Karen Siderelis

    Karen Siderelis, Associate Director, Geospatial Information and Chief, Information Officer, US Geological Survey

  • An introduction to the US Geological Survey and National Geospatial Programs Office
  • Contributions to homeland security through the improved mapping of urban environments and data sharing
  • Maximising the potential of geospatial and satellite observations
  • Improving collaboration and interoperability among a variety of agencies that contribute to the geointel picture in the United States
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:00 UK HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE

    Ruth Adams

    Ruth Adams, Head, Additional Military Layers , UK Hydrographic Office

  • Aims and concepts of Additional Military Layers (AML)
  • Relationship of AML to the Recognised Environmental Picture (REP)
  • Consistency of environmental data across NATO
  • Portrayal issues of environmental data
  • Hurdles to interoperability
  • 14:40 WHAT CAN GMES DO FOR SECURITY?

    Dr Mark Doherty

    Dr Mark Doherty, Head, Exploitation and Services Division/Science and Applications Department, Earth Observation Programmes Directorate, European Space Agency (ESA)

  • GMES users and their needs
  • GMES data sources and infrastructure
  • Service providers and service issues
  • Interaction between security and environment
  • Security aspects
  • Sustainability
  • Future prospects
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 BRING SPACE-BASED EO INTO THE NATION'S ISR TOOLKIT

    Professor Jan-Peter Muller

    Professor Jan-Peter Muller, Image Understanding and Remote Sensing, Department of Geomatic Engineering, University College London

  • Analysing the requirements for remote monitoring
  • Minimising the gaps in data collection opportunities
  • The need to integrate across collection sources
  • Automating the collection of intelligence using image understanding techniques
  • Assessing what civilian space assets have to offer for the near future
  • 16:20 THE ROLE OF DUTCH SMEs AND TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTES IN GEOINT

    George Lavigne

    George Lavigne, Managing Director, Imagem B.V / Intel Account Manager, Geomatics Business Park Defence Group

  • Sensors and data acquisition
  • Satellite and airborne assets
  • Ground segment - information extraction
  • Feeding the C2 chain
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett

    Colonel (Ret'd) Jeremy Barrett, Principal Consultant, The Salamander Organization

    9:10 THE ROLE OF GI IN PROVIDING SUPPORT TO MILITARY OPERATIONS

    Brigadier Nicholas Rigby

    Brigadier Nicholas Rigby, Director, Defence Intelligence Joint Environment (DIJE), Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Bringing together all the various disciplines into a coherent manageable state
  • The provision of the framework and the derived Geospatial Intelligence to help plan, train and operate
  • 9:50 THE CONTRIBUTION OF GEOSPATIAL INTELLIGENCE IN PROVIDING TERRAIN INFORMATION TO THE WARFIGHER

    Major John Tate

    Major John Tate, Senior Instructor, Terrain Analysis, Royal School of Military Survey, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • What will Geospatial Intelligence deliver to the warfighter?
  • Terrain (environmental) information and terrain analysis provision to the warfighter
  • Providing terrain information with sufficient detail, when and where it is required with appropriate tools for expoitation
  • Adapting what we deliver today to meet the needs of tomorrow's warfighter
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 ROLE OF GEOSPATIAL SUPPORT IN FUTURE OPERATIONAL STRATEGY AND FORCE TRANSFORMATION

    Major Soenke Fischhoefer

    Major Soenke Fischhoefer, SO2 Geo Ops and Policy, J2, NATO SHAPE

  • Meeting NATO requirements and the challenges presented by the NRF
  • Provide geospatial support to NATO and operational theatres
  • NATOs future core GIS capabilities
  • 11:30 SHAPING GERMANY'S NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY POLICY

    Senior Representative

    Senior Representative, Federal Army, Gemany

    12:10 THE IMPORTANCE OF STANDARDIZATION

    Karen Irby

    Karen Irby, Director, National Center for Geospatial Intelligence Standards (NCGIS), National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

  • Why standardization matters for GEOINT systems
  • Goals of the NGA Standards Program
  • Role of GEOINT Standards Working Group (GWG)
  • Standards selection criteria
  • NGA-OGC relationship in developing GEOINT standards
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:00 THE IMPORTANCE OF DEVELOPING AND ESTABLISHING STANDARDS FOR GIS

    Olaf Ostensen

    Olaf Ostensen, Chairman, ISO/TC 211, Geographic Information/Geomatics, Norwegian Mapping Authority

  • Objectives of ISO/TC 211
  • The importance of developing and establishing GIS standards
  • ISO standardisation process and status of work
  • OGC-ISO relationship in developing standards
  • Adoption and implementation - case studies
  • 14:40 IT STANDARDS FOR GEOINT - EXTENDING ISO DESIGN - TO STANDARDS TO BUILD - TO SPECIFICITY

    Sam Bacharach

    Sam Bacharach, Executive Director, Outreach, Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)

  • The influence of the OGC in the current and future geospatial marketplace
  • Responding to the needs of the wider community - providing for both a Common Operating Picture and an unlimited number of user-defined operating pictures
  • The role that standards-based web services play in GEOINT and data-sharing
  • The Common Services Framework via Open Geospatial Web Services (OWS)
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 GEOSPATIAL INTELLIGENCE - A CRITICAL CAPABILITY FOR CRIME CONTROL

     Assistant Chief Constable Tofiluk

    Assistant Chief Constable Tofiluk, Intelligence, West Midlands Police

  • The development of operational doctrine
  • Opportunities to act against serious and organised crime
  • Development of a linked intelligence system
  • 16:20 RUMOUR AND THREAT VS INTELLIGENCE AND MANOEUVRE IN THE NIGER DELTA

    Brigadier (Ret'd) Chris Holtom CBE

    Brigadier (Ret'd) Chris Holtom CBE, Information Director, Mars Omega

  • Very complex, dynamic operating environment of the Niger Delta
  • Ambitious business targets in a virtual war zone
  • A way of looking at complexity
  • Changing the game and changing the culture
  • Measures of success
  • 17:00 INTEGRATION OF MULTIPLE DATA SOURCES

    Commodore (Ret'd) Patrick Tyrell OBE

    Commodore (Ret'd) Patrick Tyrell OBE, Director, Vale Atlantic Associates

  • Hardware and software costs have tumbled yet why do IT costs continue to soar?
  • What can be done about legacy data systems?
  • How can we base decisions on Geospatial Intelligence?
  • What is "actionable intelligence" ?
  • How to develop the intelligence of intelligence?
  • Seeing is believing - impact of geospatial data, technologies and techniques on society
  • Effects based Geospatial Intelligence
  • 17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.