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In order to meet warfighter sustainment needs and the operational requirements of today, the structure of supply chain management is constantly being forced to react. Fundamental changes and collaborative initiatives are occurring in order to maximise quality processes and to eliminate waste.

This conference will address the relative successes in supply chain management advancement, examining leading edge concepts and discussing how they are working in the real world. It will explore some of the expectations associated with supply chain and decide whether they can be legitimately guaranteed. Challenges in partnerships and supplier management will evidently be a source of discussion, identifying key enablers and strategies of management. The conference will cover the many issues emerging from the competitive market of the defence industry with a specific view to supply chain management development, looking at global issues of integration as well as asset, performance and supplier management.

Lessons learned and industry best practises will be examined, demonstrating possible solutions to reoccurring problems in many supply chain management concepts. In addition to identifying and discussing key areas of responsibility and challenges that are related to achieving supply chain objectives, the conference will focus on what needs to be done to keep the promises that have been made.

Benefits of Attending:

REVIEW country specific supply chain management policy and doctrine
MAXIMISE supply chain efficiency and cost effectiveness
GAIN a valuable insight into the latest defence supply chain initiatives
ASSESS the benefits of implementing e-business throughout your organisation
EXPLORE the future trends and developments in the supply chain arena
DEVELOP key contacts through focused networking forums

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:

  • Major General Jean Pierre Bansard, Head of Logistics, Armaments and Resources Division, NATO
  • Rear Admiral Linda Bird, Commanding Officer, Defense Supply Center Columbus, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Brigadier General Charles Fletcher Jr, Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, US Army
  • Air Commodore Matt Wiles, Director, Supply Chain Integration, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Captain Alasdair Finlayson, Materiel Flow Capability Change Team Leader, Supply Chain Integration, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Stephen Smith, Chief Executive, Medical Supplies Agency, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel Debbie Miller, Team Leader, Supply Chain/Positioning PCO, Material Acquisition and Support Optimization Project, Department of National Defence, Canada
  • Lieutenant Colonel Kate Ireland, Defence Policy and Planning, Logistics Section, International Military Staff, NATO
  • Lieutenant Colonel Wiek Noldus, Chief of Maintenance Policy Branch, Royal Netherlands Airforce
  • Lieutenant Colonel Paul Dyer, Head of Logistics Engineering, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation (LARO), Corporate Technical Services, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Marie Tinka, Deputy Chief, Supply Operations Division, Air Force Material Command, US Air Force
  • Richard Sylvester, Deputy Director, Acquisition Resources and Analysis (Property and Equipment Policy), Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, Department of Defense, USA
  • Major Michael Malm, Project Manager, Command and Control Division, Swedish Defence Research Agency
  • Senior Representative, DSDA, Ministry of Defence, UK

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Brigadier (ret'd) Frank Steer

Brigadier (ret'd) Frank Steer, Director General, Institute of Quality Assurance

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS LOGISTICS IMPLICATIONS OF NATO’S TRANSFORMATION

Major General Jean Pierre Bansard

Major General Jean Pierre Bansard, Head of LAR Division, NATO HQ

  • Deployability and sustainability of expeditionary forces
  • The capabilities required for supporting the NATO Response Team
  • The importance of implementing the multinational logistics concept
  • The need for development within third party logistics support services
  • 9:50 IMPLEMENTING SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Rear Admiral Linda Bird

    Rear Admiral Linda Bird, Commanding Officer, Defense Supply Center Columbus, Defense Logistics Agency

  • The DLA’s role in facilitating Department of Defense supply chain management practice
  • An assessment of current actions and initiatives at the DLA
  • Present end-to-end distribution capabilities required to meet 21st century deployment and sustainability requirements
  • The implementation of e-business systems within the DLA
  • Future developments and priorities of the DLA
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT WITHIN THE US ARMY

    Brigadier General Charles Fletcher

    Brigadier General Charles Fletcher, Commanding General of the Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, US Army

  • Post Iraq developments within the US Army
  • US Army transformations to improve efficiency
  • Priorities and practices
  • Future developments in defence supply chain
  • 11:40 PLANNING AND PROCUREMENT WITHIN THE MEDICAL SUPPLIES AGENCY

    Mr Stephen Smith

    Mr Stephen Smith, Chief Executive, Medical Supplies Agency, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Key strategic goals and core values of the MSA
  • The role of the MSA in peacetime and conflict
  • Overview of recent improvements in the procurement of medical supplies
  • The importance of partnerships in medical logistics
  • The future plan for the MSA
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    14:00 SUPPLY CHAIN OPTIMIZATION

    Debbie Miller

    Debbie Miller, Team Leader Supply Chain/ Positioning PCO, Materiel Acquisition & Support Optimization Project, Department of National Defence, Canada

  • Material Acquisition and Support Optimization Project (MASOP)
  • Inventory rationalization, positioning and footprinting optimization
  • Supply chain/inventory management
  • Performance management factors
  • Bridging defence and industry – optimized weapons support management – CF188 Hornet, CC130 Hercules, Light Armoured Vehicle (LAV III)
  • 14:40 SUPPLY CHAIN INTEGRATION IN THE US AIR FORCE

    Marie Tinka

    Marie Tinka, Deputy Chief, Supply Operations Division, Air Force Material Command, US Air Force

  • The integration of supply chain management and purchasing to meet warfighter requirements
  • Business process and change management
  • Moving towards a new partnering arrangement with industry
  • Supplier management, enablement and performance
  • Future trends in supply chain integration
  • 15:20 TRANSFORMING LOGISTICS IN NATO DEFENCE

    Lieutenant Colonel Kate Ireland

    Lieutenant Colonel Kate Ireland, Defence Policy and Planning. Logistics Section, International Military Staff, NATO HQ

  • SCM as an operational enabler
  • Logistics chain rather than supply chain
  • Current multinational logistics situation
  • NATO’s concept development and experimentation strategy
  • The focus for future development
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Len Nockles

    Len Nockles, Academic Leader, Cranfield University

    9:30 TRANSFORMING THE DEFENCE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Air Commodore Matt Wiles

    Air Commodore Matt Wiles, Director, Supply Chain Integration, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The case for change
  • The blueprint for change
  • Business process improvements
  • IS-enabled business change
  • The future business
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 RISK MANAGEMENT IN THE DEFENCE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Dr Helen Peck

    Dr Helen Peck, Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield University

  • Risk? What kind of risk?
  • Overcoming the strategic disconnect
  • Risk transfer – fact or fiction?
  • Are networks the problem or the solution?
  • ICT and the downgrading of logistics
  • 11:40 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Senior Representative

    Senior Representative, Ministry of Defence, UK, Intelsat Global Service Corporation

    Steve Caunt

    Steve Caunt, DSDA, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Lessons learned from TELIC
  • Current developments within the DSDA
  • Overcoming problems relating to geography and unique military requirements
  • Meeting CSA requirements
  • The future structure and priorities of the DSDA
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    14:00 EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF THE REPAIR LOOP

    Leiutenant Colonel Paul Dyer

    Leiutenant Colonel Paul Dyer, Head of Logistics Engineering, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation (LARO), DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Repairables: the various categories
  • The importance of repairables
  • Estimating future needs – activity forecasting and metrics
  • The MoD and industry interface
  • Ownership and supply chain management
  • 14:40 THE IMPACT OF E-BUSINESS ON SUPPLY CHAIN INTEGRATION

    Richard Sylvester

    Richard Sylvester, Deputy Director Acquisition Resources and Analysis (Property and Equipment Policy), Undersecretary of Defence ( Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, Department of Defense, USA

  • The e-business strategy
  • Making weaknesses into strengths
  • Identification, valuation and transportation efforts
  • State of e-business today
  • The future of e-business
  • 15:20 IMPROVING TECHNOLOGY IN DEFENCE LOGISTICS

    Major Michael Malm

    Major Michael Malm, Project Manager, Command and Control , Swedish Defence Research Agency

  • Do we allow technology to change the business logic?
  • The core of business logic in defence logistics
  • Technology innovations of today and tomorrow
  • Diffusion of innovations in organisations
  • Seven levels of change
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea

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    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden, London, United Kingdom

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    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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