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The question of how to efficiently utilise residual waste has become imperative for numerous reasons – increasing landfill taxes, the drive for a low carbon economy, the requirements of resource efficiency and the search for increased energy security.

The value of residual waste is now widely recognised, and the market potential in this sector is considerable. Its use as a fuel source through a variety of technologies is acknowledged in numerous strands of government policy, from the Renewable Energy Strategy, government heat strategy, energy efficiency, low carbon buildings to transport fuels.

Energy from Waste 2010 considers all the interconnecting policies and legislation, assesses the hurdles that beset the industry in terms of finance, planning and acceptance, and analyses the latest developments in technologies, feedstocks and markets.

 

Waste Management
Key topics to be addressed:
  • The political dimension of delivering waste infrastructure
  • Using waste to produce energy from a retailer's perspective
  • Procuring separate waste services and fuel use contracts
  • The procurement process and planning aspects
  • Lowering the carbon footprint of waste management in a risk averse market
  • A review of Waste to Energy plants and technologies
  • Development and growth of Combined Heat and Power and waste incineration potential
  • Managing risk in EfW projects from an investor's perspective

See the full two day Energy from Waste 2010 agenda

 

  • Understand the key challenges affecting the development of the Energy from Waste industry in 2010
  • Hear from key policy developers, programme directors and waste management experts
  • Compare and contrast international projects and financing methods
  • Update your knowledge of the current market to ensure future success

See which leading industry publications are supporting the event

 

 

All those involved in developing Energy from Waste projects including utility companies, technology providers and financiers including:

  • Project Developers
  • Project Engineers
  • Chief Financial Offiers
  • Policy Officers
  • Head of Infrastructure
  • Head of Planning and Strategy
  • Commercial Directors
  • Head of Waste and Waste Infrastructure
  • Waste Management Programme Directors

 

 

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chair's Opening Remarks

John Twitchen

John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

9:10 THE POLITICAL DIMENSION OF DELIVERING WASTE INFRASTRUCTURE

Malcolm Chilton

Malcolm Chilton, Managing Director, Covanta Energy

  • New political and policy priorities following the election
  • Key political challenges for the new government
  • Managing the national/local interface
  • Developing relationships for project delivery
  • Overcoming barriers to development
  • 9:50 THE REQUIREMENTS AND ISSUES SURROUNDING MEASUREMENT OF BIOGENIC CONTENT OF WASTE FEEDSTOCKS FOR CONVERSION TO ALL TYPES OF ENERGY

    Chris Manson-Whitton

    Chris Manson-Whitton, Biomass Energy Manager, Progressive Energy

  • The techniques available
  • The role of Carbon-14 and it's status in the UK
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 CASE STUDY: DELIVERING RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM FOOD WASTES

    Dean Pearce

    Dean Pearce, SE Regional Account Manager, PDM Group

  • Utilisation of a variety of technologies/platforms
  • Renewable power generation - CHP combustion and anaerobic digestion
  • Challenges from using retail and manufacturing food wastes
  • 11:40 CASE STUDY: NORTH LONDON WASTE AUTHORITY - PROCURING SEPARATE WASTE SERVICES AND FUEL USE CONTRACTS

    Euston Ling

    Euston Ling, Fuel Use Manager, NLWA Harringay Council

  • The importance and means for delivering recycling ambitions
  • Managing the interface between the waste services and fuel use procurements
  • Developing a solid recovered fuel (SRF) specification and potential technological solutions available for producing that fuel
  • Potential technological solutions to maximise the SRF potential
  • Capturing the potential benefits of financial instruments such as ROCs, LECs, ECAs, RHI, etc.
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 CASE STUDY: MERSEYSIDE PFI CONTRACT

    Carl Beer

    Carl Beer, Director, Merseyside Waste Disposal Authority

  • EfW contract fundamentals
  • Funding through PFI
  • Developing the most appropriate mix of technologies on the most appropriate sites
  • Benefits and obstacles
  • 14:30 CASE STUDY: THE PROCUREMENT PROCESS AND PLANNING ASPECTS

    Ian Benson

    Ian Benson, Project Director W2R, Staffordshire County Council

  • Closing out the project
  • The way forward
  • Lessons learned
  • 15:10 EFFECTIVELY COMMUNICATING EFW

    John Twitchen

    John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

  • Informing, consulting and involving stakeholders
  • Community benefit, community buy-in
  • Political and other influences on decision-making
  • 15:50 Chair’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    John Twitchen

    John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chair's Opening Remarks

    John Twitchen

    John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

    9:10 CAN WASTE AND BIOMASS PLAY A BIGGER ROLE IN RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION?

    Egan Archer

    Egan Archer, Director and Chief Technical Officer, Aleltho Energy

    • An alignment of the  push and pull drivers for waste management and renewable energy generation?
    • The UK’s commitment to renewable energy and its current performance in this regard
    • Should ambitions for renewable energy from waste and biomass be greater than that targeted?
    • Estimated cost commitments to achieve the 2020 renewable target
    • Infrastructure development
    • Feedstock and technology considerations

    9:50 CASE STUDY: PLASMA GASIFICATION – LESSONS LEARNED AT THE ECOVALLEY EFW FACILITY

    Kevin Willerton

    Kevin Willerton, VP, Strategic Alliances and Business Development, Alter NRG

  • Megan Macadam Ecovalley, the largest plasma gasification EfW facility in the world
  • The Japanese plant and has been operating since 2003
  • The facility, operated by Hitachi metals, experienced 3 significant commissioning issues
  • Each issue, its resolution and the impact on the operations at Ecovalley
  • How the learnings from Ecovalley have been incorporated into the latest plasma gasifier design
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 WASTE TO ENERGY PLANTS AND TECHNOLOGIES

    Paul James

    Paul James, UK Project Development Director, Ramboll

  • Future residual waste treatment
  • An overview of key drivers and selection criteria
  • Update on BAT
  • 11:40 LEVERAGING NEW WASTE INFRASTRUCTURE TO CREATE MARKETS FOR RENEWABLE HEAT

    James Buckingham

    James Buckingham, Project Director / Transactor, Local Partnerships / Waste Infrastructure Delivery Programme

  • Harnessing the renewable heat incentive
  • Overcoming procurement constraints
  • Investment considerations
  • Optimising value for money
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH OF CHP POTENTIAL

    Tony Grimshaw

    Tony Grimshaw, Project Director, Ener G

  • Technical and planning issues surrounding increased heat production
  • Securing ROCS
  • Heat delivery barriers
  • Business models and partnership structures
  • 14:30 MANAGING RISK IN EFW PROJECTS FROM AN INVESTOR'S PERSPECTIVE

    Ed Simpson

    Ed Simpson, Investment Manager, The Carbon Trust

  • Project risk in the EfW sector
  • Raising debt and equity finance for an EfW project
  • Types of potential investors
  • Typical risk mitigation techniques required prior to funding commitment
  • 15:10 FINANCING ENERGY FROM WASTE INFRASTRUCTURE – THE ROLE OF THE LENDER

    Andrew Hartley

    Andrew Hartley, Head of Infrastructure, Bank of Ireland

  • Project fundamentals for attracting funding
  • Differentiating your project - role of merchant waste, CHP
  • Hurdles in getting to financial close
  • Financing structures to address project risks
  • 15:50 Chair’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

    John Twitchen

    John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

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    Workshops

    Waste Collection Challenge
    Workshop

    Waste Collection Challenge

    Crowne Plaza - The City
    5th October 2010
    London, United Kingdom

    Crowne Plaza - The City

    19 New Bridge Road
    London EC4V 6DB
    United Kingdom

    Crowne Plaza - The City

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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