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Throughout the Baltic States there are over 21 oil and gas companies with acreage exploring and testing for lucrative Shale Gas. In June 2011 the first borings from Poland showed high levels of saturation, promising signs for those hoping to operate in the region, with reserves estimated to be over 3.66 trillion cubic metres. Currently reserves in Europe from conventional resources are predicted to run out by 2068, unconventional gas could extend this to 2128 at the current rate of consumption.

 

The UK has been a net importer of gas for the last 8 years, exploiting the estimated shale gas reserves would change this. However the majority of those hoping to exploit this resources in europe are still in the early seismic survey stages but even these early stages of exploration have attracted negative attention, fuelled by media, speculation and experiences in the United States.This conference will present a balanced view of the Shale Gas debate, with a focus on the science, facts, and case studies from those with acreage.

 

Currently reserves in Europe from conventional resources are predicted to run out by 2068, unconventional gas could extend this to 2128 at the current rate of consumption. The UK has been a net importer of gas for the last 8 years, exploiting the estimated shale gas reserves would change this. However the majority of those hoping to exploit these resources in Europe are still in the early seismic survey stages but even these early stages of exploration have attracted negative attention, fuelled by media, speculation and experiences in the United States.
 

SMi Group’s third bi-annual conference will present a balanced view of the Shale Gas debate, with a focus on the science, facts, and case studies from those with acreage.
Over 2 days 25 leading experts will separate the myths from the truths, leading to a open and balanced discussion of what may be a revolutionary source of energy.

  • Building Control Manager
  • Campaign Manager & Team Leader
  • Chief of Operations
  • Commercial Director
  • Development Projects Manager
  • Director of Exploration
  • Director of HSEQ and Regulatory Affairs
  • Economic Officer
  • Energy and Climate Change Policy Officer
  • Environment Science Technology and Health Counselor
  • Environmental Advisor
  • Group Head of Environment
  • Head of Energy and Environment
  • Project Manager
  • Senior Analyst
  • Senior Climate Change Policy Officer
  • Senior Commerical Analyst
  • Senior Economist
  • Senior Engineer
  • Team Leader, Energy & Minerals
  • Technical Director

 

Prevous attendees

Adjility Consulting; Advanced Well Technologies; D B E Technology; Dassault Aviation; Deimos Imaging Spain; Gedling Borough Council; Grumman Corp; INDIAN IMMUNOLOGICALS LTD; INTERNATIONAL DRUG & CHEMICAL CO; INVINEX LABORATORIES LIMITED; Ogi Lab; R M 5 Software Oy; S I T A; Samsung Fire And Marine Insurance Co Ltd; Shell Exploration & Production Company (Sepco); Southern California Edison; St George's, University of London; T V N Z; Xanthus Consulting International;

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Alan Riley

Alan Riley, Professor of Law, City Law School, City University

9:10 Golden Rules for a Golden Age of Gas

Capella  Festa

Capella Festa, Senior Energy Analyst, IEA

• What energy trends can we expect between now and 2035?
• What role might unconventional gas play in the future global energy mix?
• What ‘Golden Rules’ are necessary to ensure that public concerns are met?
• What would a high or a low scenario for unconventional gas imply for global gas trade, energy security and climate change?

9:50 Facts, facts, facts: the Shale Gas Information Platform SHIP is launched

Andreas  Hubner

Andreas Hubner, Project coordinator, Shale Gas Information Platform

• Concept: Information, Discussion, Publication.
• A scientist network at the heart of SHIP to get the message across
• Interaction - the key to fact-based discussion
• SHIP and its kind: how to communicate the science of shale gas

10:30 Morning Coffee

11:00 Can shale gas fit with a sustainable energy future?

Chris Shearlock

Chris Shearlock, Environment Manager, The Co-operative Group (C W S) Ltd

• What do resource estimates imply for UK and global carbon budgets?
• Have groundwater contamination concerns been correctly addressed?
• Alternatives approaches for our energy future

11:40 Myths and realities: The impact of shale gas on climate change

Jenny Banks

Jenny Banks, Energy and Climate Change Policy Officer, WWF UK

• How low carbon is shale gas?
• What role can gas play in meeting future climate change targets
• Options for decarbonisation – the relative merits of low carbon technologies

12:20 Networking Lunch

13:40 Environmental Due Diligence Monitoring for the Unconventional Petroleum Sector

John Naylor

John Naylor, Technical Director, Ground-Gas Solutions

• The importance of environmental due diligence
• Regulatory imperative?
• Collecting evidence – baseline to beyond well abandonment
• Continuous environmental monitoring – gas and water
• Stakeholder communication

14:20 Effective communication: Getting the message across regarding the environmental impact of shale gas

Paul Kelly

Paul Kelly, Director, PPS Group

• Gasland transformed profile of the environment issues surrounding on-shore oil and gas exploration in the UK.
• Operators need to invest in open and transparent communications and engagement to maintain the social licence to operate.
• Some rules for effective communication with local people, politicians and the media

15:00 Afternoon Tea

15:30 Managing the Environmental Risks From Shale Gas Within England and Wales

Martin  Diaper

Martin Diaper, Climate Change Advisor, Environment Agency

• Current state of play in England and Wales
• Environmental risk and public perception
• How environmental regulation addresses these risks
• Where next with environmental regulation

16:10 Shale Gas Geological Risk

Richard Davies

Richard Davies, Director of Durham Energy Institute, Durham University

• Assess what the safe separation distance between fracking depth and shallower water aquifers
• Look at the global record of induced earthquakes and compare this to what we know about earthquakes induced as a direct result of hydraulic fracturing
• Look at some of the other potential risks that have yet to be raised but should be researched in order to be ruled out

16:50 The geological challenges of shale gas reservoirs

Kevin Taylor

Kevin Taylor, Professor in Basin Studies , The University of Manchester

• There is significant geological uncertainty that limits confidence in the development of shale gas exploitation. 
• This uncertainty is multi-scale in nature, from km-scale down to nano-scale processes and products, presenting a unique challenge to both exploration and extraction. 
• This presentation will highlight the manner of these geological challenges and recent progress towards minimising uncertainty

17:30 Shale gas and the planning system

Tom Leveridge

Tom Leveridge, Energy and Climate Change Senior Policy Officer, Campaign To Protect Rural England

• Environmental trade-offs
• Impact on the countryside
• Shale gas in the planning system
• The importance of community engagement

18:10 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

Alan Riley

Alan Riley, Professor of Law, City Law School, City University

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Alan Riley

Alan Riley, Professor of Law, City Law School, City University

9:10 Development of Unconventional Resources. A deep change in Culture

Philippe Charlez

Philippe Charlez, Unconventional Resources Development Director , Total

• How geosciences drivers impact development drivers
• Consequences in terms of environment (water supply, waste management,  and acceptability of major stakeholders (reality but sometimes myths)

9:50 More than a Gamechanger: The Impact of Shale Gas in the 21st Century

Alan Riley

Alan Riley, Professor of Law, City Law School, City University

• In terms of the developments in the energy industry since the beginning of the industrial revolution how big a development is shale gas?
• Can is the likely impact of gas markets worldwide...how far can shale gas grow the global gas market?
• What are the geostrategic implications of shale gas
• What are the positive and negative consequences for climate change?

10:30 Morning Coffee

10:50 UK Shale Gas: An Industrial Strategy? An Engineering Perspective

Tim Fox

Tim Fox, Head of Energy and Environment, Institution Of Mechanical Engineers

• UK Energy Security and Affordability in an International Context
• The Big Issues – Water, Earthquakes and Localism
• Lessons Learnt from the USA
• An Engineering Perspective – The Institution’s Position

11:30 Panel Discussion

Tim Fox

Tim Fox, Head of Energy and Environment, Institution Of Mechanical Engineers

Philippe Charlez

Philippe Charlez, Unconventional Resources Development Director , Total

Joanna Hanson

Joanna Hanson, Independent Consultant, Plexus Energy

12:10 Networking Lunch

13:30 Shale Gas Risks – Lessons from the Americas

James Lockhart-Smith

James Lockhart-Smith, Head of Latin America, Maplecroft

• Policy and stakeholder perspectives
• Analysis of the policy and regulatory environments for shale gas operations
• Emerging policy changes
• Surrounding political and social issues
• Environmental stresses

14:10 Environmental risks, opportunities and regulatory challenges in the US and Europe

• Environmental risks of shale gas exploration and extraction – knowledge and uncertainty
• The European regulatory framework and its applicability to shale gas
• Flowback and produced water management in Pennsylvania and its relevance to Europe
• Recent developments in water treatment and re-use options, and future issues

Mark  Broomfield

Mark Broomfield , Principal Consultant , AEA Technology

Betsy Bicknell

Betsy Bicknell, Environmental Engineer, Eastern Research Group

14:40 Afternoon Tea

15:00 Hydrocarbon taxation: where state and private interests meet (or come apart)

Greg Pytel

Greg Pytel, European Commission Advisor and Energy Expert, Sobieski Institute

• Tax on profits (CIT) v Royalties
• General taxation v Contracts (such PSC)
• Short term gain v long term risks
• Financial equilibrium v social and political equilibrium

15:40 Can natural gas replace oil dependence in UK transport?

John  Baldwin

John Baldwin, Managing Director, CNG Services Limited

•   CNG Services Ltd
• NGV briefing – worldwide
•  NGV - UK
•  Dual fuel trucks
• Use of LTS to supply gas to CNG stations
•  Saving in oil imports
•  Conclusions

16:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

Alan Riley

Alan Riley, Professor of Law, City Law School, City University

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FEATURED SPEAKERS

Martin  Diaper

Martin Diaper

Climate Change Advisor, Environment Agency
Peter  Wood

Peter Wood

Petroleum Engineer, IEA
Philippe Charlez

Philippe Charlez

Unconventional Resources Development Director , Total

Alan Riley

Professor of Law, City Law School, City University
Alan Riley

Andreas Hubner

Project coordinator, Shale Gas Information Platform
Andreas  Hubner

Betsy Bicknell

Environmental Engineer, Eastern Research Group
Betsy Bicknell

Capella Festa

Senior Energy Analyst, IEA
Capella  Festa

Caroline Lucas

MP, Green Party Of England And Wales
Caroline Lucas

Chris Shearlock

Environment Manager, The Co-operative Group (C W S) Ltd
Chris Shearlock

Greg Pytel

European Commission Advisor and Energy Expert, Sobieski Institute
Greg Pytel

James Allan

Principal Environmental Analyst , Maplecroft
James Allan

James Lockhart-Smith

Head of Latin America, Maplecroft
James Lockhart-Smith

Jenny Banks

Energy and Climate Change Policy Officer, WWF UK
Jenny Banks

Joanna Hanson

Independent Consultant, Plexus Energy
Joanna Hanson

John Baldwin

Managing Director, CNG Services Limited
John  Baldwin

John Naylor

Technical Director, Ground-Gas Solutions
John Naylor

Kevin Taylor

Professor in Basin Studies , The University of Manchester
Kevin Taylor

Mark Broomfield

Principal Consultant , AEA Technology
Mark  Broomfield

Martin Diaper

Climate Change Advisor, Environment Agency
Martin  Diaper

Paul Kelly

Director, PPS Group
Paul Kelly

Peter Wood

Petroleum Engineer, IEA
Peter  Wood

Philippe Charlez

Unconventional Resources Development Director , Total
Philippe Charlez

Richard Davies

Director of Durham Energy Institute, Durham University
Richard Davies

Tim Fox

Head of Energy and Environment, Institution Of Mechanical Engineers
Tim Fox

Tom Leveridge

Energy and Climate Change Senior Policy Officer, Campaign To Protect Rural England
Tom Leveridge

Copthorne Tara Hotel

Scarsdale Place
Kensington
London W8 5SR
United Kingdom

Copthorne Tara Hotel

The Copthorne Tara Hotel London Kensington is an elegant contemporary four-star hotel in prestigious Kensington, located just a two minutes walk from High Street Kensington underground station, making exploring easy. The hotel offers well-appointed and comfortable guest rooms combining Standard, Superior and Club accommodation. Club rooms offer iconic views over the city and include Club Lounge access for complimentary breakfast and refreshments. Guests can sample the authentic Singaporean, Malaysian and Chinese cuisine at Bugis Street, traditional pub fare at the Brasserie Restaurant & Bar or relax with a delicious drink at West8 Cocktail Lounge & Bar.

The Copthorne Tara Hotel boasts 745 square meters of flexible meeting space, consisting of the Shannon Suite and the Liffey Suite, ideal for hosting conferences, weddings and social events. Facilities include access to the business centre 24 hours a day, fully equipped fitness room, gift shop, theatre desk and Bureau de Change. With ample onsite parking outside the London congestion charge zone and excellent transport links via Heathrow Airport, the hotel is the perfect location for business or leisure stays. The hotel is within close proximity to the shops of High Street Kensington, Knightsbridge and Westfield London, Olympia Conference Centre, Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Palace and Hyde Park.

 

HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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WHAT IS CPD?

CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

GLOBAL CPD

Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

CPD Certificates

We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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