Home
overview

Shale gas is natural gas that is found within shale formations. Trapped within these rock formations the gas is released through horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing (a process in which water, chemicals, and sand are pumped into the well to unlock the hydrocarbons trapped in shale formations by opening fractures in the rock) allowing large volumes of gas to be released that were previously uneconomical to do so before. Horizontal drilling is used to provide greater access to the gas trapped deep in the producing formation.


Shale gas has become an increasingly important source of natural gas in the United States over the last 15 years, which has resulted in a widespread interest in gas shales throughout the rest of the world. In 2000 shale gas provided only 1% of U.S. natural gas production; by 2010 it was over 20% and the U.S. government's Energy Information Administration predicts that by 2035, 46% of the United States' natural gas supply will come from shale gas alone.

Europe however, faces a different set of challenges and the extent at which the success of shale gas in the US can be emulated is very much in debate. The variety of legislation and policy throughout the European Community makes multinational operations incredibly difficult, with some countries offering wholehearted support, whilst others have banned it outright, which serves to limit competitiveness and prevent the move away from a reliance on coal importation. The greater population density also means that the impact on local populations is increased, whose opinions are equally polarised. The most contentious issue being the impact that fracking has on the environment.

The extraction and use of shale gas can potentially affect the environment through a number of means- the leaking of chemicals and waste into local water supplies, the leaking of greenhouse gasses during the extraction process, and the pollution caused by the incorrect processing of natural gas, and seismic activity caused by the fracking process itself.
 

SMi's 4th Shale Gas Environmental Summit will build upon the 2012 events with focussed sessions from industry leaders on today's hot topics in the field, including the legal landscape currently in place in the EU and the evolution of managable policy solutions, monitoring and mitigation methods, cutting edge technology used in maintaining safe and sustainable extraction, improving public engagement and understanding, management of environmental risk and the current research surrounding pollution and seismic activity. 

  • Sort the myths from the facts surrounding pollution and seismic activity
  • Debate legislation currently in place and the evolution of policy for better regulation
  • Evaluate the technological advancements in environmentally sustainable fracking solutions
  • Analyse public-private awareness & engagement initiatives
  • Discuss environmental risk management
  • Assess the reality of shale gas as an economically viable alternative to meet the UK and Europe’s increasing energy consumption
 Assistant Manager
Associate
Associate Director, Oil & Gas
Climate Change & Energy Advisor
Climate Change Advisor
Contracts Manager
Director
Director for Environmental and Community Affairs
Director of Exploration
Director of HSEQ Regulatory Affairs
Earth Science Officer
Economist
Energy and Climate Change Policy Officer
Energy and Climate Reporter
EOR Team Leader
Geologist
Group Commercial Manager
Group Head of Environment
Head of Oil, Gas & Petrochemicals, Project Finance
HSE Manager
Legal Advisor
Low Carbon Technology Manager
Partner
Principal Process Engineer
Regional Upstream Advisor
Responsible for Environment Non Conventional E&P
Sales Director
Senior Advisor
Senior Consultant
Senior Geo Scientist
Senior Legal Counsel
Soil & Groundwater Consultant
Team administrator
Trade & Economic Policy

 
 

AEA Technology; BBC; Campaign To Protect Rural England; City University London; CMS Cameron McKenna LLP; CNG Services Limited; Drewry Maritime Services; Durham University; Eastern Research Group; Environment Agency; ESCP Europe; European Investment Bank; European Offshore and Energy; Finding Petroleum; Fluxys Belgium S.A.; GDF SUEZ; Gibb; Green Party Of England And Wales; Greenshale Energy LLC; Ground-Gas Solutions; IEA; IFAKO IJAYE OJOKORO LCDA; IGas; Institution Of Mechanical Engineers; Intelligence Research; Interfax; Interfax Europe; Interfax Natural Gas Daily; Maplecroft; Minoils Media Ltd; MJM Energy; No Hot Air; Plexus Energy; Polish Oil And Gas Company (PGNIG); PPS Group; Reach Exploration (North Sea) Ltd; Saipem Ltd; Shale Gas Information Platform ; Siemens; SMi Group Ltd; Sobieski Institute; Tata Steel; Tebodin Ukraine; The Co-operative Group (C W S) Ltd; The Petroleum Economist Ltd; The University of Manchester; Total; US Embassy; Wwf Uk;

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Joe  Howe

Joe Howe, Director, UCLan Centre for Sustainable Development, University Of Central Lancashire

9:10 Role of shale gas in a low-carbon economy

David  Kennedy

David Kennedy, Chief Executive, Committee on climate change

• Overview of the path to building a low-carbon economy
• Economics of investment in low-carbon technologies compared to gas-fired generation
• Potential roles for shale gas in providing power and heat

9:40 Politics of public acceptance across Europe

Marco Althaus

Marco Althaus, Professor of Social Sciences, Wildau Technical University

• Not an engineer's world: Political logic, language, and lawmaking
• Uncertain trumpets: Why the shale gas industry can't sell itself
• NIMBY 2.0: The 21st century variants of the Not-In-My-Backyard Syndrome
• Campaign momentum: Transnational movement politics and media tactics
• Lose the battles, win the war: Why strategy must be unconventional
• The lobbying-leadership quest: Shaping the terms of acceptance through advocacy

10:10 Morning Coffee

10:40 The UK Shale Industry- its Social Licence to Operate

Ken Cronin

Ken Cronin, Chief Executive, UK Onshore Operations Group

  • Identify the areas of environmental concern
  • Identify the benefits
  • Identify how the industry is addressing
  • Shale Gas Well Guidelines
  • Engagement Charter
  • Community benefits
  • Information
  • Identify the  Government’s role
  • Planning Guidance
  • Regulatory Efficiency
  • Information provision
  • Next steps - what the future holds

     

  • 11:10 Getting the message right – perspectives on shale gas communications

    Simon Whitehead

    Simon Whitehead, Managing Director, Hill & Knowlton

  • Importance of clear and consistent positioning and messaging
  • Stakeholder management and collaboration
  • Branding and reputation
  • Current issues and perspectives
  • 11:40 Western Australia’s natural gas from shale and tight rock – an emerging new industry

    Kevin Skipworth CVO

    Kevin Skipworth CVO, Agent General For Western Australia, Government of Western Australia

  • A look at the regulation in place for Western Australia’s emerging natural gas from shale and tight rock sector
  • The importance of protecting the community and environment
  • The need for strong community engagement
  • 12:10 Networking Lunch

    13:30 Finding common ground for shale gas development in Europe

    Rob Foulkes

    Rob Foulkes, Senior Associate, Critical Resource

    • Shale gas in Europe and the ‘socio-political license to operate’
    • Experience from extractive companies elsewhere
    • Finding common ground for shale gas development

    14:00 Regulating exploratory shale gas operations: the experience of the Environment Agency (England)

    Matt Georges

    Matt Georges, Senior Advisor, Environment and Business, Environment Agency

  • Understanding environmental risks from shale gas
  • What is the regulatory framework in the UK
  • What do operators need to demonstrate in their permit applications
  • 14:30 Regulatory requirements for fracking

    Jake White

    Jake White, Environmental Lawyer, Friends Of The Earth

    • What is the regulatory environment for fracking?
    • Is it adequate?
    • If not, what changes are needed?
    • How would these changes take account of local communities’ concerns?

    15:00 Afternoon Tea

    15:30 Managing the regulatory, planning and real estate issues associated with shale projects in the UK

    Vanessa Havard-Williams

    Vanessa Havard-Williams, Partner and Global Head of Environment and Climate Change Team, Linklaters

  • Property rights, compulsory purchase and case law relevant to onshore shale projects
  • Key planning policy and stakeholder engagement issues
  • Community benefit sharing under existing policy and proposals
  • Emerging UK and EU energy and environmental regulation
  • 16:00 Regulatory developments for the exploration of shale gas in Central and Eastern Europe

    Kostadin Sirleshtov

    Kostadin Sirleshtov, Partner, CMS Cameron McKenna LLP

    • Update on the current status of the legislation of Bulgaria, Romania, Ukraine and Poland regarding the shale gas exploration;
    • Environmental aspects of the shale gas exploration in CEE; Environmental Impact Assessments
    • The public procurement aspects of shale gas exploration in CEE
    • Outline of the likely developments in the shale gas regulation in CEE

    16:30 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    Joe  Howe

    Joe Howe, Director, UCLan Centre for Sustainable Development, University Of Central Lancashire

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Joe  Howe

    Joe Howe, Director, UCLan Centre for Sustainable Development, University Of Central Lancashire

    9:10 Golden Rules for a Golden Age of Gas

    Keisuke Sadamori

    Keisuke Sadamori, Director of Energy Markets & Security, International Energy Agency

    • Medium term outlook for the gas demand and supply
    • Impact of Shale revolution
    • Is the golden age of gas for Europe coming?
    • Golden rules: How “social license” can be earned?

    9:40 UK Shale: balancing the environmental debate

    Joseph Dutton

    Joseph Dutton, Research Associate, Global Gas Security Project, University Of Leicester

  • Lessons for the UK and Europe from the US experience 
  • The realities of environmental impacts in the UK
  • The National Planning Policy Framework and UK shale development
  • In which arena should the environmental shale debate be framed
  • 10:10 Morning Coffee

    10:40 Shale gas and groundwater in the UK

    Robert Ward

    Robert Ward, Director of Groundwater Science, British Geological Survey

    • Water demand and sourcing
    • Relationship of potential shale gas source rocks and aquifers
    • Potential contaminants and migration pathways
    • Baseline monitoring – ahead of the game

    11:10 What’s in it for me? Sustainable community investment

    Michael  Holgate

    Michael Holgate, Independent Energy Consultant, Plexus Energy

  • Lessons learned the hard way from within extractive industries
  • Community conversations: building understanding and trust
  • Community investment:  renewable opportunities
  • Examples of community renewable investments
  • Business models for community participation
  • Economics of wind, solar and biomass schemes
  • 11:40 Shale Gas: Skills, Security and Sustainability

    Joe  Howe

    Joe Howe, Director, UCLan Centre for Sustainable Development, University Of Central Lancashire

  • The Energy Challenge
  • Maximising Local Economic Impact Through Supply Chain Development and Social Sustainability
  • Regulation, Health and safety
  • Research informed Shale Gas growth Co-alitions
  • Investment in Training and Education programmes
  • 12:10 Networking Lunch

    13:30 Will Europe Miss the Shale Gas Revolution?

    Benny Peiser

    Benny Peiser, Director, The Global Warming Policy Foundation

    • Shale Shock & the Crisis of Europe's Climate & Energy Policy
    • EU Between Lisbon Agenda and Green Agenda
    • Cheap Shale, US industrial revival & Europe's Competitive Crisis
    • Britain's shale schizophrenia
    • The Myth of Europe's small shale reserves
    • Green Vs Growth: Who will win the Battle for Europe's energy future?

    14:00 Replacing or Displacing Demand for Coal?

    Anthony  Froggatt

    Anthony Froggatt, Senior Research Fellow, Chatham House

    • How permanent is the rise in cheaper gas in the US?
    • What has this done to domestic production and demand for coal?
    • How has the enlarged US coal export affected the fuel mix in Europe and other parts of the world?

    14:30 Getting shale gas to market in the UK

    John  Baldwin

    John Baldwin, Managing Director, CNG Services Limited

    • Briefing on UK gas grid (extent, ownership)
    • Location of shale compared to gas grid
    • Lessons from the UK biomethane to grid market
    • Options for test gas flows - gas to grid, electricity, CNG by road
    • Options for commercial gas flows
    • Gas quality requirements
    • Gas pressure
    • Capacity booking and gas sales
    • Project timetable for the different gas monetisation options

    15:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

    Joe  Howe

    Joe Howe, Director, UCLan Centre for Sustainable Development, University Of Central Lancashire

    +

    FEATURED SPEAKERS

    David  Kennedy

    David Kennedy

    Chief Executive, Committee on climate change
    Keisuke Sadamori

    Keisuke Sadamori

    Director of Energy Markets & Security, International Energy Agency
    Kevin Skipworth CVO

    Kevin Skipworth CVO

    Agent General For Western Australia, Government of Western Australia

    Anthony Froggatt

    Senior Research Fellow, Chatham House
    Anthony  Froggatt

    Benny Peiser

    Director, The Global Warming Policy Foundation
    Benny Peiser

    Corin Taylor

    Senior Economic Adviser , Institute Of Directors
    Corin Taylor

    David Kennedy

    Chief Executive, Committee on climate change
    David  Kennedy

    Jake White

    Environmental Lawyer, Friends Of The Earth
    Jake White

    Joe Howe

    Director, UCLan Centre for Sustainable Development, University Of Central Lancashire
    Joe  Howe

    John Baldwin

    Managing Director, CNG Services Limited
    John  Baldwin

    Joseph Dutton

    Research Associate, Global Gas Security Project, University Of Leicester
    Joseph Dutton

    Keisuke Sadamori

    Director of Energy Markets & Security, International Energy Agency
    Keisuke Sadamori

    Ken Cronin

    Chief Executive, UK Onshore Operations Group
    Ken Cronin

    Kevin Skipworth CVO

    Agent General For Western Australia, Government of Western Australia
    Kevin Skipworth CVO

    Kostadin Sirleshtov

    Partner, CMS Cameron McKenna LLP
    Kostadin Sirleshtov

    Marco Althaus

    Professor of Social Sciences, Wildau Technical University
    Marco Althaus

    Matt Georges

    Senior Advisor, Environment and Business, Environment Agency
    Matt Georges

    Michael Holgate

    Independent Energy Consultant, Plexus Energy
    Michael  Holgate

    Rob Foulkes

    Senior Associate, Critical Resource
    Rob Foulkes

    Robert Ward

    Director of Groundwater Science, British Geological Survey
    Robert Ward

    Simon Whitehead

    Managing Director, Hill & Knowlton
    Simon Whitehead

    Vanessa Havard-Williams

    Partner and Global Head of Environment and Climate Change Team, Linklaters
    Vanessa Havard-Williams

    Holiday Inn Regents Park

    Carburton Street
    London W1W 5EE
    United Kingdom

    Holiday Inn Regents Park

    Choose the well-connected Holiday Inn London-Regent's Park hotel, with a superb central London location and speedy transport links. Holiday Inn London-Regent's Park is in a leafy and cosmopolitan area of central London, a 10-minute walk from bustling Oxford Street. Leave your car in our NCP managed underground car park, and explore London by Tube. Great Portland Street Tube station is 25 metres from the hotel, from where you can reach the City and Canary Wharf in 30 minutes, and London Heathrow Airport in 45 minutes.

    Wireless Internet is available throughout the hotel, and you can invite up to 300 people to events at the Academy Conference Centre, with an IT technician and break-out zones. Holiday Inn London-Regent's Park is a 10-minute walk from Santander's offices and businesses in the BT Tower. Stroll 5 minutes to Regent's Park, where you'll find London Zoo and pretty Primrose Hill. We're a 10-minute walk from Bond Street boutiques and 20 minutes from Buckingham Palace and cruises on the River Thames.

    Ask our Concierge to plan your day out and book West End theatre tickets. Room Service is available 24 hours at Holiday Inn London-Regent's Park, or dine in the vibrant Junction Restaurant. Our Junction Bar has a menu of light bites, and a hot breakfast buffet is served daily.

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.