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The energy sector in Ireland has been subject to significant changes in recent years- European and International policy and legislation have provided the Irish energy market with newly defined market structures. The EU's objectives for competition in the internal market and improved environmental protection have become major factors in Irish energy policy. There has been a shift in emphasis on environmental issues, pushing forward markets such as sustainability and renewables to ensure future security of supply. With an increase in the uptake of energy from renewable sources, competition in Ireland is stronger than it's ever been and continues to drive the market forward. Undoubtedly, this surge in new market opportunities has provided market openings for new entrants - Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland markets are converging with Northern Ireland recognising the benefit of being part of an "All-Island" of Ireland electricity market and being connected to the Great Britain grid. As a result, trading relations must be improved and built on and one way of doing so is to look further afield at European merging markets, further ahead in the liberalisation game. The industry must work hard to minimise entry barriers in a transparent way and with minimal risk involved. As the Irish energy market continues to prosper, so will the opportunities for growth and investment, in all areas.

This conference will focus on the evolving Irish energy policy framework, new market structures, driving competition forward and sustainable energy strategies across all sectors.

In particular the following areas will be addressed:

Gas - Electricity - Wind farms - Regulations/Policies - Wave-Generated energy - Case studies from international markets

  • Ability to meet environmental objectives and the cost of compliance to the Kyoto agreements
  • ESB is very dominant and is controlling 95% of the market
  • Wind energy: Problems with safety of the grid as it can't deal with large capacity of wind
  • Sustainable/renewable energy
  • Security of supply - economically sustainable production
  • All-island Market - Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland convergence
  • Creating new business environments to encourage new players onto the market
  • Options for future renewable energy policy, targets and programmes

BENEFITS OF ATTENDING BULLET POINTS:
  • FULL MARKET OPENING: Understand the implications of new market arrangements and assess how customers will benefit from deregulation in 2005
  • IRISH ENERGY REGULATIONS: Identify the challenges of implementing a legislative and regulatory framework, while considering the EU legislation
  • WIND ENERGY: Evaluate wind energy as the major source of power for energy in Ireland and discover offshore wind energy projects
  • COMPLYING WITH THE KYOTO AGREEMENT: Hear about the new environmental approach of emissions trading, the implications for energy producers and future challenges
  • INTERCONNECTOR TRADING: Maximise the integration of the Irish energy market with the UK market, overcome problems encountered and assess future progress and opportunities

INDUSTRY EXPERTS:
  • Tom Reeves, Commissioner, Commission for Energy Regulation
  • Denis Cagney, Head, Electricity Networks & Tariffs, Commission for Energy Regulation
  • Douglas McIldoon, Director General, OFREG
  • John Barry, Project Manager, Bord Gais Eireann
  • Kieran O'Brien, Managing Director, ESB National Grid
  • Dr Eddie O'Connor, Chief Executive, Airtricity
  • Gary Ryan, Sales & Marketing Director, Energia
  • Andreas Wagner, Director Marketing, Communications & Government Affairs Europe, Wind Energy, GE Energy
  • Morgan Bazilian, Department Head, Sustainable Energy Ireland
  • Dr Hans Christian Soerensen, Chairman, Wave Dragon, Chief Executive Officer, SPOK Aps

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Tim Cowhig

Tim Cowhig, Chairman, Irish Wind Energy Association

9:10 NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE IRISH ENERGY MARKET

Tom Reeves

Tom Reeves, Commissioner, Commission for Energy Regulation

9:50 REGULATION

Douglas McIldoon

Douglas McIldoon, Director General, OFREG

  • Implementing a legislative and regulatory framework, while regarding the EU legislation and the development of an all-island energy market
  • Liberals and environmentalists
  • Empowering consumers while creating an effective market
  • Influence of future regulations and policies on the energy market
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 MARKET LIBERALISATION

    Andrew Cooke

    Andrew Cooke, Manager, Regulatory & Pricing, ESB National Grid (Eirgrid)

  • Building the infrastructure
  • Implications for participants
  • All island perspective
  • Implications for renewables
  • 11:40 COMPETITION POLICY IN IRISH ENERGY MARKETS

    Dave O’Connell

    Dave O’Connell, Case Officer, The Competition Authority

  • Background – principles and objectives of liberalisation
  • Progress of gas and electricity market liberalisation
  • Gas and electricity markets – similarities and differences
  • Actions required
  • Conclusion
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 FULL MARKET OPENING: WILL CUSTOMERS REALLY NOTICE?

    Gary Ryan

    Gary Ryan, Sales & Marketing Director, Energia

  • Overcoming high acquisition costs
  • Access to competitively priced generation
  • Implications of new market arrangements
  • Dominance of incumbent players
  • Creating efficient customer service channels
  • 14:30 MANAGING YOUR CUSTOMERS FOR VALUE

    Paul Grey

    Paul Grey, Chief Technology Officer, Peace Software

  • Looking at the dynamics of customer profitability, customer loyalty and customer lifetime value (CLV)
  • The whale curve of profitability – identifying which customers are profitable and which are unprofitable using recent research
  • Just who is the loyal customer? Customer traits that contribute to the evaluation of individual customer loyalty
  • The individual nature of customers – the “golden”, “mercurial” and the “faithful” customers
  • Look at how CLV focuses on overall customer value going forward. It can help an energy retailer ascertain what it should be doing, with whom, when and how – having also established what it should not be doing, with whom, when and why
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 WIND POWER

    Tim Cowhig

    Tim Cowhig, Chairman, Irish Wind Energy Association

  • Ireland’s energy supply; the potential of wind power
  • Problems with the grid
  • Provides economic growth, security of energy supply, employment and technology development
  • Reforms of the rules, regulations and infrastructure
  • Wind energy as the major source of power for energy in Ireland
  • 16:20 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    Dr Ken Macken

    Dr Ken Macken, Programme Manager, Emissions Trading Unit, Environmental Protection Agency

  • Update on greenhouse gas emissions – where Ireland is now
  • What will happen on 1st January 2005 – are you ready?
  • Implications for energy producers
  • Role of environmentally sustainable energy
  • Future challenges for Ireland
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Fergus Cahill

    Fergus Cahill, Chairman, Irish Offshore Operators’ Association

    9:10 EAST-WEST INTERCONNECTION

    Denis Cagney

    Denis Cagney, Head, Electricity Networks & Tariffs, Commission for Energy Regulation

  • Benefits to be found
    • Enhanced security of supply
    • Increased competition
    • Integrate Ireland into the wider European energy market
  • Integrating the Irish energy market with the UK market
  • Creating more market opening
  • Problems that have been encountered and how to overcome them
  • Future progresses and opportunities
  • 9:50 NI-RoI INTERCONNECTION

    Robin McCormick

    Robin McCormick, Systems Operations Manager, System Operator for Northern Ireland (SONI)

  • Interfacing with MAE
  • Market operation vs system operation
  • Maximising training opportunities
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 GAS MARKET

    John Barry

    John Barry, Project Manager, Bord Gais Eireann

  • The North West pipeline
  • The South North pipeline
  • 11:40 WIND ENERGY

    Andreas Wagner

    Andreas Wagner, Director Marketing, Communications & Government Affairs Europe, Wind Energy, GE Energy

  • Ireland’s and Europe’s wind energy resource
  • Current status of development in Ireland and in the EU
  • Wind energy outlook 2010/2020
  • GE’s wind turbine technology
  • Offshore wind energy in Ireland and elsewhere
  • Barriers and obstacles for further development
  • Regulatory and grid issues
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 RENEWABLE SOURCES

    Morgan Bazilian

    Morgan Bazilian, Department Head, Sustainable Energy Ireland

  • Interaction with the electricity market
  • Intermittency and reserves
  • Fiscal support options
  • 14:30 IMPACT OF MARKET LIBERALISATION ON THE WIND ENERGY MARKET

    Dr Eddie O’Connor

    Dr Eddie O’Connor, Chief Executive, Airtricity

  • Meeting Ireland’s requirements (targets, legislation, key players, infrastructure)
  • Increasing penetration of energy sources (incentives, technologies, constraints)
  • Long-term energy agreements
  • A review of current projects
  • Problems with wind and the stability of the grid
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CASE STUDY

    Dr Hans Christian Soerensen

    Dr Hans Christian Soerensen, Chairman, Wave Dragon, Chief Executive Officer, SPOK Aps

  • Renewable energy source with considerable commercial potential
  • The “prototype” in Nissum Bredning fjord
  • Challenges encountered and how they have been overcome
  • Opportunities for the future
  • 16:20 THE ALL-ISLAND MARKET

    Patricia Lawless

    Patricia Lawless, Partner, McCann FitzGerald

  • The broader European Context
  • Next steps to realising convergence
  • The challenges in aligning both markets
  • Implications for market players
  • Legislative, contractual, technical and regulatory issues involved
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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