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The recent Russia-Ukraine crisis, Iran's end of compliance with the IAEA, and world-wide effects of disasters related to climate change (Hurricane Katrina and Rita ), rising Oil prices and import dependancy has highlighted the urgent need for the West to diversify its energy supply.
The public, politicians and analysts alike, are now putting this topical issue at the heart of their political and economic agenda. Energy Security has now become an urgent priority and global security concern.

SMi’s inaugural conference on Energy Security, will set the stage in the heart of London for a timely discussion on the most important issues surrounding oil and gas dependency.
Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to interact with leading experts while they discuss the problems and solutions of today’s greatest global security threat..

Energy Security.. "Fuel for the Future"

Programme Highlights:

Gain valuable insight into the future of energy demand and supply challenges from leading International Oil majors

Identify the key issues to continuing global economic prosperity and the importance diplomacy plays in our energy future

Develop a understanding of how competition, political and economic factors affect security of supply

Learn about the importance and technical challenges of infrastructure security and reliability

Hear how a leading oil major handled platform and facility recovery for the Gulf of Mexico 2005 Hurricane season

Assess the possibilities of nuclear energy, alternative energy, and discuss how we can overcome Oil dependency through technology and energy diversification

The excellent speaker line-up key industry leaders includes:

  • Russell G Bellis, Exploration Director, ExxonMobil International
  • Christof Ruehl, Deputy Chief Economist, BP
  • Dick Chifipa Mhango, Chief Economist, PetroSA
  • Sibongile Qoza, Principal Economist, PetroSA
  • Jake Ulrich, Managing Director, Centrica
  • Laszlo Varro, Chief Economist, MOL Group
  • Petter Nore, President, Hydro Russia
  • Bernard McCabe Jr, Global Head of Security, Marathon Oil
  • James C Davis, President, Chevron Energy Solutions
  • Gijs van Breda Vriesman, General Manager, European Business Development Shell Hydrogen
  • Robert Armour, General Counsel & Company Secretary, British Energy
  • Dr Jacob Klimstra, Senior Energy & Engine Specialist, Wärtsilä Power
  • Dr Konstantin Simonov, Director, Center for Current Politics in Russia
  • Commodore Bruce Williams OBE, Deputy Commander, UK Maritime Force / Commander UK Task Force, Royal Navy
  • Malcolm Grimston, Nuclear Policy Expert, Chatham House
  • Stanley Morris, Russell Pride and Marc Steen, Joint Research Centre, European Commission
  • Dr Patrick Cronin, Director of Studies, International Institute of Strategic Studies
  • Hans Holger Rogner, Section Head, Planning and Economic Studies Section, Department of Nuclear Energy, IAEA
  • Kevin Rosner, Vice-President, Center for Energy Defence, Switzerland


Mr Ewan Wallis

Conference Producer

SMi - Energy Division

( Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6746

Ê Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6747

* Email: ewallis@smi-online.co.uk

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Andrew  Kaine

Andrew Kaine, Managing Director, AKE Group

9:10 ENERGY OUTLOOK

Russell Bellis

Russell Bellis, Exploration Director, ExxonMobil Group

  • By 2030, energy demand will increase by almost 50% from today's level, driven by economic progress and population growth.
  • Approximately 80% of this growth in energy demand will occur in non-OECD countries.
  • Energy efficiency gains, enabled by advanced technologies, will accelerate.
  • Oil, gas & coal will remain predominant, representing about 80% of total energy consumed; access to resources and timely investments remain vital.
  • Increases in fossil fuel use will lead to increases in CO2 emissions, with the vast majority of increases coming from the developing nations.
  • Nuclear power will be a growing option to meet electricity needs.
  • Technology advances will remain critical to successfully meeting energy supply and demand challenges.
  • 9:50 ENERGY SECURITY AND THE G-8

    Christof  Ruehl

    Christof Ruehl, Deputy Chief Economist , Bp International Limited

  • How to define energy security?
  • Where do we have it, and where do we not have it?
  • What changed after the G-8 meetings?
  • What role for economics and what for politics?
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE TRENDS IN CRUDE OIL PRICE

    Faizel  Mulla

    Faizel Mulla, Corporate Strategy Manager, Petro SA

  • The historical trends in oil price
  • Major economic and political factors influencing crude oil price
  • The role of OPEC in influencing prices and impact of rising prices on the industry
  • What influences consumption demand?
  • How can the world embrace itself for the future of the energy sector?
  • 11:40 SECURING ENERGY SUPPLIES IN A UNCERTAIN WORLD

  • The implications of a changing geopolitical energy environment
  • Our European neighbours: friend or foe?
  • Enter the Dragon: a global competition for energy
  • Back to the source: building relations with gas-producing nations
  • Building bridges: The role of diplomacy
  • Jake Ulrich

    Jake Ulrich, Managing Director , Centrica

    Sarwjit  Sambhi

    Sarwjit Sambhi , Director of Portfolio Optmisation, Centrica PLC

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 ENERGIZING CONFLICT

    Dr Patrick  Cronin

    Dr Patrick Cronin , Director of Studies, iiss

  • Myths of energy and conflict
  • Energy as a rare but occasional major link to conflict
  • Energy as fuelling protracted conflict
  • Energy competition
    - a potential contributor to major power competition and cold war
  • 14:30 ENERGY SECURITY OF SUPPLY

    Senior Representative M.O.D Royal Navy

    Senior Representative M.O.D Royal Navy, Admiral, Ministry of Defence

  • Introducing the maritime contribution – seeking to ensuring free movement of supplies on the high seas
  • Supply vulnerabilities – chokepoints, regional instabilities and their potential impact
  • Dealing with the threat – the unique maritime challenges – practical, jurisdictional and diplomatic
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NATURAL GAS MARKETS

    Laszlo  Varro

    Laszlo Varro , Chief Economist , MOL Group

  • A historical overview; high reliance on Russian sources, East – West infrastructure, segmentation, distorting subsidies
  • The new member states as a crucial transit region between EU15 and Russian/Caspian
  • Prospect for a integrated Central European Market, demand assessment
  • New infrastructure developments: The Nabucco pipeline, LNG proposals
  • Energy security initiatives: strategic storage, demand reduction

  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Andrew  Kaine

    Andrew Kaine, Managing Director, AKE Group

    9:10 A REGIONAL APPROACH TO ENERGY SECURITY

    Lucille Langlois

    Lucille Langlois, Planning and Economic Studies Section, IAEA

  • Energy outlook in the Baltic states (Lithuania, Latvia & Estonia) after closure of Ignalina NPP
  • Impact on energy import dependence
  • Supply security mitigation options
  • Nuclear power in a regional rather national context
  • 9:50 SECURITY AND RELIABILITY OF OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURES AND SUPPLY

    Dr Stanley  Morris

    Dr Stanley Morris , Project Manager, EU Commission

  • An international overview of the threats to the physical security of the oil and gas infrastructures and reliability of supply
  • Technical challenges to improve overall resilience of the infrastructures to these threats and to develop and understanding of the consequences of supply disruptions, such as
  • -Interconnectivity of gas infrastructures and adequacy of storage capacity in the EU; simulation of disruption scenarios and consequences

    - Exploiting the results of pipeline monitoring projects (threats to pipelines) including EU – Russia - Ukraine co-operations in this field

    - developing the capacity for EU – CIS scientific/technical networking aimed at a "best practice" approach to physical security of gas and oil infrastructures and reliability of supply

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 PLATFORM AND FACILITY RECOVERY -THE SECURITY FACTOR

    Bernard  McCabe Jr

    Bernard McCabe Jr , Global Head of Security , Marathon Oil Company

  • Setting the stage
  • Pre - hurricane preparation
  • Post - storm response
  • Katrina and Rita infrastructure damage
  • Petroleum response issues
  • Lessons learned
  • 11:40 SAFETY IN NUMBERS

    Jim  Davis

    Jim Davis , President of Chevron Energy Solutions, Chevron Energy Solutions

  • Security, environmental and economic factors driving energy resource diversification
  • The role of performance contracting
  • Case studies and trends in the U.S public sector
  • Private sector examples: efficiency and alternative power projects at Chevron
  • The road ahead
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF THE ELECTRICITY SECTOR IN IMPROVING FUEL EFFICIENCY AND SUPPLY RELIABILITY

    Dr Jacob Klimstra

    Dr Jacob Klimstra, Senior Energy and Engine Specialist, Wartsila Power Nederland

  • The electricity sector as the single largest fuel consumer
  • The worldwide low fuel efficiency of this sector
  • Electricity as the real motor of the economy and energy carrier of the future
  • The need for flexibility in power capacity and in fuels
  • Improvement opportunities depending upon local boundary conditions
  • 14:30 ALTERNATIVE ENERGY

  • New energy drivers
  • Sustainable mobility and fuels
  • Renewables (wind and solar)
  • Hydrogen
  • Carbon management
  • Duncan  McCleod

    Duncan McCleod , Vice President , Shell Hydrogen BV

    Gijs  van Breda Vriesman

    Gijs van Breda Vriesman, General Manager, European Business Development, Shell Services International

    15:00 Afternoon Tea

    15:30 NUCLEAR

    Robert  Armour

    Robert Armour , General Counsel & Company Secretary , British Energy Group Plc

  • Developments in nuclear generation around the globe
  • Uranium reserves and where they come from
  • Nuclear technologies: generation III and generation V
  • 16:10 NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Malcolm  Grimston

    Malcolm Grimston, Nuclear policy expert , Chatham House

  • Why did nuclear fall out of fashion?
  • Why is back in the debate?
  • What are the drivers for a nuclear build?
  • What are the barriers?
  • How will it turn out?
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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