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Targets set by the European Landfill Directive state that England and Wales must landfill no more than 8 million tonnes of biodegradable municipal waste by 2012/2013 and 5.5 million tonnes by 2019/202. Currently 30.9 million tonnes of municipal waste is collected a year and England and Wales must therefore find alternative methods of waste management and maximising this resource.

 

Energy from Waste will now more than ever play a bigger role in contributing to these targets and a new energy policy. SMi's 5th annual conference will evaluate the contribution and effect Energy from Waste will have on our energy future.

It is predicted that EfW can provide 11% of our total energy needs from unrecyclable waste and SMi Group's fifth annual Energy from Waste conference will bring together a panel of over 30 industry experts to provide an evaluation of the contribution and effect it will have on our energy future, and an assessment of the current EfW landscape in the UK. This will be done through thorough examination of updated regulatory and political frameworks which govern and encourage the industry’s development via recent case studies, success stories, proposed plant projects and regulatory updates.

 

Energy from Waste capacity in the UK lags behind the greenest countries in Europe, with 25 plants for a 61 million population, whereas Denmark has 32 plants for a population of just 5 million. EfW gives Denmark 16% of its heat and power by combusting unrecyclable material. The UK has a growing energy crisis with supply not equalling demand from 2017. The situation is made worse by the rising cost of importing gas, decreasing availability of landfill space and companies pulling out of building nuclear power stations. Attendee's of the conference will have the opportunity to network with, discuss and hear from current industry leaders as to the role EfW will have over the next 10 years over 2 days.

 

 

Images courtesy of Veolia Environmental Services
 

  • Advisor project
  • Assistant Programme Manager
  • Bio-Energy Manager
  • Chief Consultant
  • Development Manager
  • Director Business Development
  • Director of Environmental Services
  • Field Marketing Manager
  • Finance Director
  • Head of Commercial Group
  • Head of Proposal
  • M&A adviser
  • Manager - Operations
  • Manager, International Sales
  • Managing Director
  • Operations Manager
  • Project Manager
  • Senior Commercial Manager
  • Technology Opportunity Manager

ADAS; Addleshaw Goddard; Air Products Plc; Alter NRG; Amec Group; Aquilex Welding Services; Audeh Group; Bioenergen LTD; Biossence; Black & Veatch (U.K.) Limited; Centrica Energy; Clarke Energy Ltd; DONG Energy; Doosan Power Systems; Energy Technologies Institute; Envi Con & Plant Engineering GmbH; Ethanol - Jobs Com; Eversheds; FORCE Technology ; G4 Consulting Engineers; Gaia Power; Golder Associates (UK) Ltd; Infinis; Keppel Seghers Belgium N V; Kier Property Ltd; Larne Borough Council; London Waste and Recycling Board; MCF Corporate Finance; Merseyside Waste Disposal Authority; MVV Environment Ltd; Norfolk County Council; North London Waste Authority; OEM Domestic Appliances Ltd; Organic Power ; Ramboll UK; Renergy Biogas Limited; Sauce Consultancy; Saudi Geophysical Consulting (S G C O); Schmack CARBOTECH GmbH; Shell International Petroleum; Sita UK; SMBC Europe Division; UTI Facility Management; Walker Morris Solicitors; Welsh Assembly Government;

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

John Twitchen

John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

9:10 Delivering efficiencies in Waste Services

John Enright

John Enright, Project Director-Waste Programme Lead for Joint Working, Local Partnerships

• Tighter budgets, so can we protect, even improve public services?
• Change is needed, but what are the barriers.
• Examples of innovations being made and where partnerships are delivering savings in waste management.
• Examples of service improvements
• Sink, or swim like crazy to stay afloat. Are these the only options?

9:40 The growing importance of heat in energy policy: The role for waste

Tim  Rotheray

Tim Rotheray, Head of Policy, Combined Heat And Power Association

• Implications of the Government’s heat strategy
• Changes to the incentive regime
• The overall view for investors for EfW CHP

10:10 Morning Coffee

10:40 Case study of the Plymouth EfW CHP plant and the impact of recent legislative changes

Paul Carey

Paul Carey, Director, MVV Environment Ltd

• History and current status of this high efficiency CHP project
• Prospect for further CHP and district heating
• Impact of the RHI and RO changes
• Discussion of risk sharing mechanisms

11:10 Financing Energy from Waste

Stephen Hazelton

Stephen Hazelton, Senior Executive, Ernst & Young

• Large scale projects
• Small scale projects
• Anaerobic Digestion
• Local Authority Funding

11:40 Panel Discusion - Renewable Energy Incentives and Investment

Gaynor Hartnell

Gaynor Hartnell, Chief Executive, Renewable Energy Association

Stephen Hazelton

Stephen Hazelton, Senior Executive, Ernst & Young

Robert Gregory

Robert Gregory, Principal, Golder Associates (UK) Ltd

Andrej Miller

Andrej Miller, Policy Manager, DECC

12:10 Networking Lunch

13:10 Case Study Project W2R – Post Closure & Contract Management

Ian Benson

Ian Benson, Commissioner for the Sustainable County , Staffordshire County Council

• Staffordshire’s experiences Post PFI closure since 2010
• Importance of Contract Management
• Construction to date
• The future and CHP

13:40 Riverside Resource Recovery Energy from Waste Facility

Andy Pike

Andy Pike, Director, Cory Environmental Ltd

•Background to the project, planning and development
•Plant specification and contracting structure
•Construction, reliability & performance testing
•Operations

14:10 Norfolk Waste PFI: a residual waste treatment project case study

Joel  Hull

Joel Hull, Project Director, Residual Waste Service, Norfolk County Council

• Using competitive dialogue for smarter procurement
• Delivering an Energy From Waste project - achievements and lessons learnt
• Looking to the future - challenges and opportunities

14:40 Waste to Energy- U.S. Central Command Operational Needs Science & Technology Support

Brett  Scharringhausen

Brett Scharringhausen, Deputy Chief & Command Science Advisor, Uscentcom (Ccca)

• Overview of the USCENTCOM Area of Responsibility (AOR)
• The Threat USCENTCOM and  Allies Face
• Case Study- USCENTCOM requirement's to include a Waste to Energy System
 

15:10 Afternoon Tea

15:40 Oxfordshire’s Energy from Waste Project – A successful Public Private Partnership

Andrew Pau

Andrew Pau, Head of Waste Management, Oxfordshire County Council

• Oxfordshire 2012                
• The Procurement Strategy
• Technology
• Planning Strategy and process
• Value for money
• Lesson learnt

16:10 Achieving Zero Waste: The Role of EfW in Integrated Waste Management Strategies. A Greater Manchester Case Study

• The Greater Manchester Recycling and Waste Management Solution
• The Role of EfW in this Solution
• Lessons Learnt
• Progress on our Journey to Zero Waste

David Taylor

David Taylor, Director of Contract Services, Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority

Peter Scholfield

Peter Scholfield, Construction Manager, Viridor Laing

16:40 The Industry view of EfW’s potential

David Sher

David Sher, Policy Advisor for Materials & Energy Recovery , Environmental Services Association

  • Industry view of the potential of EFW
  • Range of EFW technologies
  • CHP + EFW
  • Impact of energy market reform
  • 17:10 Greatmoor Energy from Waste

    Dan  Murphy

    Dan Murphy, Bid Director, WRG

    • Project overview
    • The procurement process
    • Challenges to delivery

    17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    John Twitchen

    John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    John Twitchen

    John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

    9:10 Renewables Obligations as a Catalyst for EfW?

    Andrew  Hirst

    Andrew Hirst , Associate, Eversheds

    • Update on the Renewables Obligations  
    • The Electricity Market Reforms
    • Impact on viability and funding of EfW plants
    • Experience from recent closed projects

    9:40 The Renewable Heat Incentive and opportunities for Energy from Waste

    Andrej Miller

    Andrej Miller, Policy Manager, DECC

    • An overview of the RHI
    • What support it offers for EfW
    • Planned future improvements

    10:10 Morning Coffee

    10:40 Case Study: Renewable Energy Project in London

    Ralf  Trottnow

    Ralf Trottnow, Business Development Director, Biossence

  • Project Deliverability Issues for advanced thermal conversion technology (ACT) using SRF as fuel
  • Efficiency of ACT technologies
  • Bridging the Funding Gap for ACT projects,
  •  Examples of an operating ACT plant in Europe
  • 11:10 Bio Methane to Grid from Adnams Bio Energy to Fairfield Bio Energy

    Steve Sharratt

    Steve Sharratt, Group Chief Executive , Bio Group Limited

    • Bio Group – an introduction
    • Using Low Carbon as a driver for what we design, build and operate
    • Getting our technology deployed
    • The Adnams Bio Energy facility
    • The Fairfield Bio Energy facility
    • The Dunsfold Bio Energy facility and the next steps

    11:40 Fuels from Waste or waste activities

    Stuart  Hayward-Higham

    Stuart Hayward-Higham, Technical Director, SITA UK

  • Opportunities and threats to feedstock, incentives and products
  • SITA experience from the Albury LFG to LNG project
  • SITA-Cynar plastic to fuel project
  • Other technology opportunities
  • 12:10 Ready for roll-out: with finance, planning, regulation and policy all in place, are we about to see a step-change in the pace of new developments?

    Peter Conway

    Peter Conway, Director, Gaia Power

    Tom Fourcade

    Tom Fourcade, Investment Director , Bridges Ventures

    Didar Dhillon

    Didar Dhillon, Senior Associate, Pinsent Masons

    William Chubb

    William Chubb, CEO, Green Gas UK

    12:40 Plasma Gasification – A Real Commercial Alternative

  • Plasma Gasification at Air Product’s Tees Valley Project
  • Moving toward Fuel Cells and Liquid Fuels
  • Latest Commercial Reference Plants
  • Streamlined Planning and Permitting
  • Richard Fish

    Richard Fish, President, Westinghouse Plasma Corporation

    Lisa Jordan

    Lisa Jordan, Business Manager- Bio-energer Europe, Air Products Plc

    13:20 Networking Lunch

    14:20 Whither PFI? – delivering EFW infrastructure post PFI

    • the market post PFI
    • Feedstock supply  including SRF/RDF
    • Sharing the benefits – issues in incentives and offtake
    • C&I waste market
    • AD – key legal issues
    • Opportunities for local authorities?

    David Kilduff

    David Kilduff, Head of Commercial Group, Walker Morris Solicitors

    Ben Sheppard

    Ben Sheppard , Partner, Walker Morris Solicitors

    14:50 Alternative syngas utilisation options: turning waste into fuels & chemical intermediates

    George Mkushi

    George Mkushi, Senior technical adviser , Golder Associates (UK) Ltd

    • What are the large scale industrial processes that could use waste derived feedstock to create fuel (energy) or chemicals?
    • Carbon as an energy carrier - Why we have a carbon based economy
    • Evolutionary technology slotting into the current ecosystem

    15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:50 Options for and progress in advanced electricity production from wastes

    Geraint Evans

    Geraint Evans, Head of Biofuels and Bioenergy, NNFCC

    • There is increasing UK interest in advanced conversion technologies for the production of power from wastes – 700 MWe of projects have been identified by NNFCC.
    • A variety of advanced technology options are being progressed across a range of scales
    • As well as producing power, these technologies will in the future be used to produce additional products including fuels and chemicals.

    16:20 Online method of determining renewable energy yield from mixed municipal and commercial wastes

    Stuart Wagland

    Stuart Wagland, Academic Fellow in Energy from Waste, Cranfield University

    • Variability of municipal solid waste [MSW] and commercial & industrial [C&I] waste materials
    • Thermal Energy from waste
    • Renewable energy potential of MSW and C&I
    • Understanding biogenic content for renewable obligation certificates [ROCs]
     

    16:50 No longer Waste, but which form of Energy?

    Christopher Maltin

    Christopher Maltin, Chairman, Organic Power

    • Energy from Waste has historically been electrical generation via steam from incineration of household waste
    • Over 60% of household waste is organic which is about 70% water and so is not a good energy source!
    • Historically not a problem when waste contained 8% plastics giving 80% of the energy, but plastics now being recycled
    • Gasification and anaerobic digestion will give energy and also fertilisers as the nitrogen is not lost to incineration
    • Reasons for creating Renewable Energy indicate that making vehicle fuel might be better than generating electricity

    17:20 Similarities and differences in making LFG and AD biogas projects bankable

    Robert Gregory

    Robert Gregory, Principal, Golder Associates (UK) Ltd

    • Both landfill gas (LFG) and biogas projects rely on the degradation of waste; one in relatively uncontrolled conditions (LFG), one in relatively controlled conditions (AD).
    • There has been >20 years experience in LFG resource assessment forecasting in the UK, but there is much less experience in forecasting biogas from AD plants in the UK.
    • Investment costs, running costs, and revenue stream models are well rehearsed for both technologies, and both have benefitted from incentivisation.
    • LFG schemes fail mainly due to mismanagement of the landfill and poor understanding of the gas resource.  AD schemes fail due to the disproportionately higher relative cost of technology, lack of economies of scale, operational sensitivity to changing feedstock, inexperience in operation (in the UK), and the frequent need to dispose for no fee a potential revenue stream – digestate.
    • Consolidation of the AD market will eventually give AD operators comparable leverage when purchasing fixed plant or maintenance contracts that the LFG operators have now, but at the moment, small operations lack the muscle to negotiate the big wins that the LFG developers have.

    17:50 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

    John Twitchen

    John Twitchen, Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy

    +

    FEATURED SPEAKERS

    Andrew Pau

    Andrew Pau

    Head of Waste Management, Oxfordshire County Council
    David Taylor

    David Taylor

    Director of Contract Services, Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority
    Ian Benson

    Ian Benson

    Commissioner for the Sustainable County , Staffordshire County Council
    Joel  Hull

    Joel Hull

    Project Director, Residual Waste Service, Norfolk County Council

    Andrej Miller

    Policy Manager, DECC
    Andrej Miller

    Andrew Hirst

    Associate, Eversheds
    Andrew  Hirst

    Andrew Pau

    Head of Waste Management, Oxfordshire County Council
    Andrew Pau

    Andy Pike

    Director, Cory Environmental Ltd
    Andy Pike

    Ben Sheppard

    Partner, Walker Morris Solicitors
    Ben Sheppard

    Brett Scharringhausen

    Deputy Chief & Command Science Advisor, Uscentcom (Ccca)
    Brett  Scharringhausen

    Christopher Maltin

    Chairman, Organic Power
    Christopher Maltin

    Dan Murphy

    Bid Director, WRG
    Dan  Murphy

    David Kilduff

    Head of Commercial Group, Walker Morris Solicitors
    David Kilduff

    David Sher

    Policy Advisor for Materials & Energy Recovery , Environmental Services Association
    David Sher

    David Taylor

    Director of Contract Services, Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority
    David Taylor

    Didar Dhillon

    Senior Associate, Pinsent Masons
    Didar Dhillon

    Gaynor Hartnell

    Chief Executive, Renewable Energy Association
    Gaynor Hartnell

    George Mkushi

    Senior technical adviser , Golder Associates (UK) Ltd
    George Mkushi

    Geraint Evans

    Head of Biofuels and Bioenergy, NNFCC
    Geraint Evans

    Ian Benson

    Commissioner for the Sustainable County , Staffordshire County Council
    Ian Benson

    Joel Hull

    Project Director, Residual Waste Service, Norfolk County Council
    Joel  Hull

    John Enright

    Project Director-Waste Programme Lead for Joint Working, Local Partnerships
    John Enright

    John Twitchen

    Managing Director, Sauce Consultancy
    John Twitchen

    Lisa Jordan

    Business Manager- Bio-energer Europe, Air Products Plc
    Lisa Jordan

    Nigel Proctor

    Partner, Eversheds
    Nigel Proctor

    Paul Carey

    Director, MVV Environment Ltd
    Paul Carey

    Peter Conway

    Director, Gaia Power
    Peter Conway

    Peter Scholfield

    Construction Manager, Viridor Laing
    Peter Scholfield

    Ralf Trottnow

    Business Development Director, Biossence
    Ralf  Trottnow

    Richard Fish

    President, Westinghouse Plasma Corporation
    Richard Fish

    Robert Gregory

    Principal, Golder Associates (UK) Ltd
    Robert Gregory

    Stephen Hazelton

    Senior Executive, Ernst & Young
    Stephen Hazelton

    Steve Sharratt

    Group Chief Executive , Bio Group Limited
    Steve Sharratt

    Stuart Hayward-Higham

    Technical Director, SITA UK
    Stuart  Hayward-Higham

    Stuart Wagland

    Academic Fellow in Energy from Waste, Cranfield University
    Stuart Wagland

    Tim Rotheray

    Head of Policy, Combined Heat And Power Association
    Tim  Rotheray

    Tom Fourcade

    Investment Director , Bridges Ventures
    Tom Fourcade

    William Chubb

    CEO, Green Gas UK
    William Chubb

    Workshops

    Energy from Waste Project and Technology Optimisation
    Workshop

    Energy from Waste Project and Technology Optimisation

    Copthorne Tara Hotel
    19th September 2012
    London, United Kingdom

    Copthorne Tara Hotel

    Scarsdale Place
    Kensington
    London W8 5SR
    United Kingdom

    Copthorne Tara Hotel

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel London Kensington is an elegant contemporary four-star hotel in prestigious Kensington, located just a two minutes walk from High Street Kensington underground station, making exploring easy. The hotel offers well-appointed and comfortable guest rooms combining Standard, Superior and Club accommodation. Club rooms offer iconic views over the city and include Club Lounge access for complimentary breakfast and refreshments. Guests can sample the authentic Singaporean, Malaysian and Chinese cuisine at Bugis Street, traditional pub fare at the Brasserie Restaurant & Bar or relax with a delicious drink at West8 Cocktail Lounge & Bar.

    The Copthorne Tara Hotel boasts 745 square meters of flexible meeting space, consisting of the Shannon Suite and the Liffey Suite, ideal for hosting conferences, weddings and social events. Facilities include access to the business centre 24 hours a day, fully equipped fitness room, gift shop, theatre desk and Bureau de Change. With ample onsite parking outside the London congestion charge zone and excellent transport links via Heathrow Airport, the hotel is the perfect location for business or leisure stays. The hotel is within close proximity to the shops of High Street Kensington, Knightsbridge and Westfield London, Olympia Conference Centre, Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Palace and Hyde Park.

     

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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