Home
overview
The financial model plays an integral part of the project development process. The role of the model is to provide important output information for the main shareholders, which will illustrate how the initial estimate transforms into cash flow, income and profit over the project life.

Financial Modelling in PPP/PFI 2004 will focus on the latest issues within this area of PPP/PFI.

The aim of this conference is to demonstrate how the success of a project is dependent largely on financial modelling, and through careful financial analysis. The conference will broaden the scope to address complex issues related to financial modelling, which will be illustrated through theoretical and practical case studies. The latest country specific financial modelling issues and case studies will be discussed including representatives from: United Kingdom, Northern Ireland, Portugal and the Netherlands

Just some of the issues covered in this event will be:
· Basic financial concepts in PFI projects – Avoiding the financial bear traps!
· Financial Modelling – Practical points to consider
· Financial modelling from an operational perspective
· Incorporating tax into the financial model
· Modelling techniques in Local Authority PFI Projects
· The role of Financial Modelling as an analytical tool
· Managing the modeller
· Refinancing and Financial Modelling

Benefits of Attending :
· Gain a thorough understanding of the latest Treasury report and its effect on financial modelling
· Identify how to develop an effective model to meet deal requirements
· Learn how to incorporate tax into the financial model
· Understand how to make sensible use of your financial model
· Prepare for the risks of PPP involvement
· Discover how to strategically tailor the model to your project
· Raise the profile of your organisation by learning from leading experts

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:

  • Jeremy Skinner, Senior Policy Analyst, HM Treasury
  • David Finlay, Head of PFI Development, National Audit Office
  • David Locke, Executive, 4ps
  • Sian Dunstan, Project Director, Partnerships UK
  • Paul McCormick, Education Officer – PFI & Premises manager, Sheffield City Council
  • Mike Inman, Head of Premises & Client Services and Paul Gerrard, Head of Education Finance Unit, Stoke-on-Trent City Council
  • Rodney Smith, Deputy Principal Economist, Department of Education for Northern Ireland
  • Jorge Abreu Simôes, President, Partnerships Health
  • Michael Redican, Managing Director, Deutsche Bank AG London
  • Paul Webber, Principal Consultant, Babtie Group
  • Paul Bartlett, Director of Real Estate Tax Group, Deloitte & Touche
  • Matthew Pitts, Head of Refinancing and Sandip Mahajan, and Senior Executive, Ernst & Young

    “Very useful networking opportunities and very informative”
    Previous delegate of Financial Modelling 2003 conference

  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Roland Davis

    Roland Davis, Executive Director, CIBC World Markets

    9:10 KEYNOTE INTRODUCTION

    David Finlay

    David Finlay, Head of PFI Department, National Audit Office

  • An overview of public sector and private sector needs for modelling
  • How financial modelling has developed within the two sectors
  • Key issues that need to be addressed
  • 9:20 OVERVIEW OF THE TREASURY REPORT

    Jeremy Skinner

    Jeremy Skinner, Senior Policy Analyst, HM Treasury

  • Introduction to appraisal and evaluation
  • New guidance on appraising PFI projects
  • Programme level assessment
  • Project level assessment
  • Procurement issues
  • 9:50 FINANCIAL MODELLING

    David Finlay

    David Finlay, Head of PFI Department, National Audit Office

  • Why the same problems seem to re-occur frequently
  • Pitfalls in financial modelling: what they are and how to avoid them
  • How to get to a usable answer in half the time
  • How modelling may develop in the light of the Treasury report
  • 10:20 THE REQUIREMENT OF FINANCIAL MODELLING IN PFI

    Sian Dunstan

    Sian Dunstan, Project Director, Partnerships UK

  • Anecdotes
  • Value of financial modelling
  • Why quality matters
  • Prudential framework
  • Consolidated and consistent framework for evaluation
  • The necessity for producing a sound financial model
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 FINANCIAL MODELLING FOR LOCAL AUTHORITY PROJECTS IN A PRUDENTIAL FRAMEWORK

    David Locke

    David Locke, Director, 4Ps, United Kingdom

  • Developing innovative financing models for long-term procurement projects
  • Assessing project characteristics
  • Sponsors and governance objectives
  • Financing structures available
  • Implementing innovative structures
  • Lessons learned from PPP and PFI projects
  • 12:00 FINANCIAL MODELLING IN PPP/PFI PROJECTS

    Paul McCormick

    Paul McCormick, Education Officer – PFI & Premises Manager, Sheffield City Council

  • Ensuring cost effective strategies through PFI/BSF
  • How crucial is the financial model?
  • Model development – Who should be involved
  • Dealing with long-term funding issues
  • Obtaining and maintaining value for money
  • Project life cycle expectations
    Impact of BSF on financial modelling
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 INNOVATIVE FUNDING OF A RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECT

    Paul Webber

    Paul Webber, Principal Consultant, Babtie Group

  • Scheme instigators
    Stakeholders
  • Project drivers
    Scheme developments
  • Risk analysis and mitigation
    Funding sources and issues
  • Funding models
  • Procurement strategy
  • Opportunities generated
  • 14:40 CASE STUDY

  • What’s in, What’s out – affordability
  • Sampling for data – accuracy
  • Procurement time – affordability
  • Change mechanisms
  • Public Sector Comparator
  • Pre-contract modelling
    Post – contract modelling
  • Mike Inman

    Mike Inman, Head of Premises and Client Services, Stoke on Trent City Council

    Paul Gerrard

    Paul Gerrard, Head of Education Finance, Stoke-on-Trent City Council

    15:20 MODELLING TECHNIQUES IN LOCAL AUTHORITY PFI PROJECTS

    Darryck Luiz

    Darryck Luiz, Manager, Grant Thornton

  • Sculpting the unitary charge – what are the benefits?
  • What are the risks to, procurers, bidders and funders?
  • Alternative approaches to contract debtor – financial impact and UK GAAP perspective
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One Followed by Afternoon Tea

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Paul Evans

    Paul Evans, Director, Enumera

    9:10 INCORPORATING TAX INTO THE FINANCIAL MODEL

    Paul Bartlett

    Paul Bartlett, Director of Real Estate Tax Group, Deloitte & Touche

  • The fixed asset approach to taxing PFI and PPP
  • The contract debtor approach to taxing PFI
  • How to determine the most appropriate tax assumptions for the financial model
  • Changing the tax assumptions on refinancing
  • Latest developments in PFI/PPP taxation
  • 9:40 MODELLING CONSIDERATIONS IN EDUCATION

    Rodney Smith

    Rodney Smith, Deputy Principal Economist, Department of Education for Northern Ireland

  • Background – PFI/PPP in the Northern Ireland Education Sector
  • Early modelling – do we have a potential runner?
  • Modelling the Public Sector Comparator
  • Bidders’ models – what is the public sector looking for and how does this differ from what they are telling us?
  • Modelling the payment mechanism – what do the different stakeholders require?
  • Lessons to be learnt and feedback to future projects
  • 10:20 MANAGING THE MODELLER

    Michael Moseling

    Michael Moseling, Project Finance Director, Atkins

  • Users’ control of model functionality
  • Clarity in setting model outputs
  • Organising input data – control, co-ordination and audit
  • Control of model changes
  • Reality checks
  • Documentation – the audit trail and operational instructions
    Dynamic status post financial close
  • 10:40 Morning Coffee

    11:00 BASIC FINANCIAL CONCEPTS IN PFI PROJECTS

    Edward Yescombe

    Edward Yescombe, Director, Yescombe Consulting

  • Investment analysis
  • Gearing/cover ratios, and their effect on the Unitary Charge
  • Common financial errors in project agreements
  • Refinancing calculations
  • 11:40 FINANCIAL MODELLING

    David Crowley

    David Crowley, Managing Director, PFI Solutions
    View Bio

  • Contents
  • Components of an effective Financial Model
  • Defining the purpose of a Financial Model
    Obtaining the base data
  • Ensuring the financial model reflects the specification
    Evaluating Risk
  • Evaluating the completed Financial Model
  • Closing remarks
  • 12:20 REFINANCING AND FINANCIAL MODELLING

  • How opportunities for refinancing arise
  • Refinancing objectives
  • Refinancing modelling issues: - Private sector perspective - Public sector perspective - Current developments
  • Matthew Pitts

    Matthew Pitts, Head of Refinancing, Ernst & Young

    Sandip Mahajan

    Sandip Mahajan, Senior Executive, Ernst & Young

    13:00 Lunch

    14:00 MODELLING CONSIDERATIONS IN HEALTHCARE

    Jorge Abreu Simôes

    Jorge Abreu Simôes, President and CEO, Partnerships Health

  • PPP Model for new and replacement hospitals
  • Payment mechanisms and payment flows
  • Preparation and Ex-Anta evaluation of PPP schemes in healthcare
  • The role and modelling of the Public Sector Comparator/ ‘Value for money’ requirements
  • The typical PPP procurement process
  • Private financial modelling, bid evaluation and final negotiations
    Key issues
  • 14:40 MODELLING AS A SOURCE OF ADDED VALUE FOR YOUR BID

    Invitation to: Paula Jennings

    Invitation to: Paula Jennings, Director, BDO Hayward

  • Developing the model during the procurement process
  • Common modelling problems and how to avoid them
  • Optimising the model
  • Passing the audit process
  • Presenting your position to the public sector
  • 15:20 PPP’S AND FINANCIAL MODELLING IN THE NETHERLANDS

    Errol Scholten

    Errol Scholten, Financial Engineer, Strukton Integrale Projecten

  • Case study: a Dutch school project
  • Modelling from a contractor’s perspective
  • Modelling from a modeller’s perspective
  • Specific Dutch modelling issues
  • Challenges
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference Followed by Afternoon Tea

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.