Home
overview
The aviation industry directly provides jobs for over 180,000 people in the UK, and contributes some £10.2 billion to our gross domestic product. With the number of air passengers growing by 5% a year and the air freight market growing by 7%, the aviation industry is an important contributor to the UK economy. The Government is planning a long-term framework for the industry, looking ahead for the next 30 years. The aim is to ensure that the future of UK air transport is a safe and sustainable one. The Government is consulting on a wide range of aviation issues.

Key topics to be addressed include:
Predictions for the future shape of the industry
Airport expansion and terminal planning
Strategies for optimising commercial potential
Competition and liberalisation: challenges and opportunities
Looking towards the future shape of the air transport industry:
Implications for airports
Capacity: planning for the future
The impact of low-cost airlines on airports
The role of regional airports
AIRPORTS EXPANSION AND TERMINAL PLANNING
The challenges of a capital intensive industry in a difficult aviation market
Planning for increased capacity in an uncertain market
Recognising the growth potential of airport infrastructure
Developing and implementing strategies that balance short-terms imperatives with long term goals
Modelling techniques: understanding long-term investment planning
Realising the commercial potential of an airport
Balancing core and non-core revenue streams
Optimising operational efficiencies
A new airport management model: nurturing uniqueness with interdisciplinary skills
COMPETITION AND LIBERALISATION IN THE AIRPORTS SECTOR
What does competition within a liberalised market mean for airports?
Privatisation and liberalisation in Europe
Approaches to airport ownership post privatisation
Creating a beneficial market in airport slots

Previous Delegates to SMi Aviation conferences include;

Malaysia Airports Holdings Berhad , A B N Amro Corporate Finance Ltd, Pricewaterhousecoopers, Changi International Airport Services, Airports Authority of Thailand, Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein, Worldwide Flight Services, JPMorgan Chase & Co, Beijing Airport Ltd, British Airways, FR Aviation Ltd, Monarch Airlines, Signature Aircraft Engineering

Airport Finance and Infrastructure is currently in production and the full programme will be available shortly. To receive the full programme please select ‘more information’ and this will be sent to you as soon as it is completed. Delegate Bookings are being taken NOW so register your attendance TODAY to guarantee your place at this important event.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Genaro Zarazua

Genaro Zarazua, Director, Lufthansa Consulting

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Roderic van Voorst

Roderic van Voorst, Consultant intra muros, European Commission, DG Energy and Transport - Unit F4 Airport Policy and Security

  • The drive towards privatisation across Europe: the state of affairs
  • The impact of privatisation on competition
  • Changes to the role of the regulator as markets liberalise and airports privatise
  • 9:40 THE STATE RELATIONSHIP WITH AIRPORTS

    Michel Wachenheim

    Michel Wachenheim, Directeur General, Direction Generale de L’Aviation Civile, Francais

    10:20 KEY TRENDS WITHIN EUROPEAN AIRPORTS

    Andrea Gebbeken

    Andrea Gebbeken, Senior Manager Business Planning and Finance, HOCTIEF Airport

  • The financing options that are being implemented in airports
  • The successful methods that have been exploited
  • Creating an effective strategy and structure
  • Using past experiences to ensure success
  • Considering all the options
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE MACQUARIE FINANCING EXPERIENCE

    Chris Frost

    Chris Frost, Divisional Director, Airports, Macquarie Bank

  • Dealing with the substantial demand for runway capacity
  • Where the demand is going to be at its highest
  • The options available for finance
  • 12:00 DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN THE ITALIAN AIRPORTS

    Riccardo Paschina

    Riccardo Paschina, Head of Airport Infrastructures and Property Development, Aeroporti de Roma

  • Dealing with the current economic and political situation – new scenario for Italian airports
  • Proposed expansions and extensions of services
  • Assessing the long-term options available for financing developments and infrastructure
  • Future plans – looking towards 2020
  • Non-core activity and property development
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 DEVELOPING THE OPERATIONAL ASSETS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

    Paul Kehoe

    Paul Kehoe, Managing Director, London Luton Airport

  • An overview of the airports progress
  • Developments over the past few years
  • The financing strategy for building a new terminal
  • Considering all the options
  • Lessons learnt to date on effective financial sourcing
  • The use of PPP and its importance the aviation industry
  • 14:40 A SMALL AIRPORT CASE STUDY

    Andrew Walters

    Andrew Walters, Chief Executive, Regional Airports

  • Achieving sustainability
  • Demonstrating the balance between economic, environmental and social needs
  • Knowing when to implement a project.
  • Being prepared for future developments
  • 14:40 CASE STUDY

    Kjeld Binger

    Kjeld Binger, Executive Vice President, Copenhagen Airport

  • Where the developments were most needed
  • Identifying the most cost effective sources of finance
  • Considering the viability of a project
  • The consideration of PPP and joint venture initiatives
  • The importance the EU and the policies being imposed
  • Developments for the future - projects on the horizon
  • 15:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Genaro Zarazua

    Genaro Zarazua, Director, Lufthansa Consulting

    9:10 PPP AS A VIABLE SOURCE OF FINANCE

    Peter Stonor

    Peter Stonor, Global Transport and Infrastructure, ABN AMRO Corporate Finance

  • The introduction of private partners
  • Are airports still attractive to external investors?
  • Attracting and encouraging private sector involvement
  • To what extent will privatisation be possible
  • Finding the appropriate structure
  • From trade sales to PPP's - the pros and cons
  • 9:40 ASSESSING THE PRIVATISATION CONSULTING

    Hamish Mackenzie

    Hamish Mackenzie, Vice President - Transportation, Deutsche Bank London

  • Considering the difficulties that exist for financing
  • Planning for increased capacity in very uncertain times
  • Developing the infrastructure – the options available
  • Knowing the potential of an airport
  • Creating an effective strategy to modernise and develop the infrastructure
  • Considering the long term objectives
  • 10:20 THE LUTON EXAMPLE

    Krishan Sharma

    Krishan Sharma, Airport Client Manager, Luton Borough Council

  • Government imposed funding restraints for Local Authority owned airports
  • Options for funding
  • Objectives of Luton Borough Council
  • Option selected
  • Highlights over the first 5 years
  • The prosperous airport of the future
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 AIRPORT FACILITIES - APPROPRIATE FOR THE MARKET?

    Jon Horne

    Jon Horne, Managing Director, Cardiff International Airport

  • An ever changing market – keeping facilities relevant
  • Airline needs versus passenger needs
  • Airport operator needs
  • Terminal development – have we got it right?
  • Where the opportunities for growth exist Matching expectation and cost
  • 12:00 EXPANDING THE DEMAND AND CAPACITY OF AIRPORTS

    Neil Pakey

    Neil Pakey, Managing Director, Liverpool John Lennon Airport

  • Meeting the demands that exist
  • Creating new demand
  • Knowing when and how to implement a project
  • Creating the new airport at Doncaster Finningley
  • The differences between private and public airport owners
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 FORM AUTRALIA TO THE ASSESSION COUNTRIES

    David Manton

    David Manton, Head of Airports, BAE Systems

  • Definition of non - aeronautical revenues
  • Non aeronautical revenue development in Australia
  • Development in the Accession Countries
  • Future of aeronautical revenues
  • 14:40 LOW COST AIRLINE

    Robin Pratt

    Robin Pratt, Associate, Steer Davis Gleave

  • Differences in infrastructure requirements to suit different
  • Passenger profile / airline requirements
  • Opportunities for increased passenger revenue
  • Impact on surface transport providers (lower revenue from premium Services such as some airport express trains)
  • Impact on airport charges and consequent impact on investment programme
  • Demands for greater competition (eg. Ryanair demand for its own Terminal at Dublin, EasyJet call to split up BAA)
  • 15:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Afternoon Tea Close of Conference

    +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.