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Branch Banking has radically changed. The evolution of multiple distribution channels means that banks no longer require their high street branches to carry out many of their traditional functions. The role of the branch has had to adapt to these recent changes and a new strategic focus is required to maximise competitive advantage.

SMi’s Branch Banking is the only conference this year that will discuss the important issues in branch banking faced by banks today. These include the recent trends in branch banking, the development of new technology and complementary delivery channels, the new role of the branch, methods to develop the branch further and how to create a customer centric branch.

It is your chance to examine the essential issues and exchange ideas with like-minded individuals. But please don’t take my word for this; take a look at some of the speakers we have on board at this event.

Robert Johnston, Senior Vice President, Channel Strategy & Development, Bank of America Steinar Juel, Senior Vice President, K-Bank, (Nordea Group) Caitlin Thomas, Head of Brand Management, Barclays Bank Gordon F Pell, Executive Director & Chief Executive, Retail Banking, Royal Bank of Scotland Group John Spence, Director of Branch Network, Lloyds TSB Bank Gary Hockey-Morley, Retail Marketing Director, Abbey National Steve Reid, Head of Branch Development, Woolwich Aidan Heslop, Assistant Director, Northern Rock Jonathan Hewett, Channels and Sales Director, Sainsburys Bank Basil Larkins, Managing Director, The Post Office

Please be aware that this conference will be marketed industry-wide, so you can be certain that your competitors will be there. Don’t let them take the upper hand. Register today and remain one step ahead of them.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Jonathan Charley

Jonathan Charley, Vice President, Financial Services, Cap Gemini Ernst & Young

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Simon Ronaldson

Simon Ronaldson, Lead Analyst, Datamonitor

  • The market for branch banking
  • The traditional role of the high street branch
  • How the role has evolved during the development of new delivery channels
  • Is a high street presence necessary in today’s marketplace?
  • Replacements for the traditional branch
  • Further uses for the high street branch
  • 9:40 REVERSING THE TREND

    Gordon F Pell

    Gordon F Pell, Executive Director & Chief Executive, Retail Banking, Royal Bank of Scotland Group

  • Overview of the Royal Bank of Scotland’s retail strategy
  • The re-launch of the NatWest brand
  • The cancellation of the closure programme
  • The role of the high street branch from the perspective of NatWest
  • 10:20 THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON THE BRANCH

    Steinar Juel

    Steinar Juel, Senior Vice President, K-Bank, (Nordea Group)

  • The role of other delivery channels which co-exist alongside the branch
  • The development of Internet banking
  • Giving customers access to their internet accounts through the branch
  • Eliminating the need for cashiers and keeping costs low
  • Using the branch to promote alternative channels to customers
  • Integrating the delivery channels to complement each other
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 IS A BRANCH NECESSARY?

    Jonathan Hewett

    Jonathan Hewett, Channels and Sales Director, Sainsburys Bank

  • Overview of Sainsburys Bank’s operations
  • How the role of the branch is undertaken by the Internet
  • Do consumers still require a branch?
  • Using the supermarkets to promote the financial services
  • Making the most of cross selling opportunities
  • Is virtual banking the future?
  • 12:00 THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTERACTIVE BRANCH

    Steve Reid

    Steve Reid, Head of Branch Development, Woolwich

  • The creation of an interactive branch
  • Overview of the interactive facilities offered by Woolwich
  • Integrating interactive and mobile banking with the branch
  • The impact on the branch
  • The importance of branding
  • Adjusting the branch strategy to complement the additional services to customers
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 INTRODUCING A BANK BRANCH FRANCHISE

    Mark Weil

    Mark Weil, Director, Oliver, Wyman & Company

  • A solution that will reduce costs and still produce revenue?
  • The benefits to the bank of shifting cost and revenue responsibilities to a third party
  • How control over the brand, technology and business processes is retained centrally
  • How the franchise system works
  • The risks and challenges associated with bank franchising
  • Is franchising a viable basis for branch management?
  • 14:00 DOING THINGS DIFFERENTLY OR DOING DIFFERENT THINGS ?

    Simon Rubin

    Simon Rubin, Vice President Marketing EMEA, NCR

  • The introduction of kiosks and ATMs as branch replacements
  • Advantages of running smaller outlets
  • Can kiosks generate revenue?
  • The pitfalls of replacing branches with kiosks
  • Privacy and security issues with kiosks and ATMs
  • Is self-service banking the future for high street branch?
  • 14:40 INTRODUCING A BANK SUPERSTORE

    Ron D'Mello

    Ron D'Mello, Head of Local Communications, Abbey National

  • Overview of the Croydon Superstore
  • The aims of the superstore
  • Creating a new banking experience
  • Partners involved with Abbey National in the project
  • The role of the superstore in Abbey National’s convenience retailing strategy
  • What next?
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 PROVIDING BANKING SUPPORT IN COMMUNITIES

    Basil Larkins

    Basil Larkins, Managing Director, Managing Director

  • History of the relationship between the Post Office and banking
  • Further agreements with other banks
  • The benefits to the Post Office
  • Can the Post Office provide the same services as the branch?
  • The future for the Post Office as a banking services outlet
  • The Universal Bank
  • 16:30 THE BRANCH: A KEY ELEMENT IN A MULTI-CHANNEL STRATEGY

    Kari Hale

    Kari Hale, Partner, Head of Retail Banking, UK Assurance and Risk Consulting, Arthur Andersen

  • Using the Branch to generate and retain customers
  • Intelligent product distribution strategy
  • Combining the branch with other channels
  • Pros and cons of e and m commerce for specific products
  • The synergy of a combined marketing strategy
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Philip D Middleton

    Philip D Middleton, Partner, European Head of Banking Strategy, KPMG Consulting

    9:10 FROM SEPARATE CHANNELS TO SEAMLESS DELIVERY

    John Hutchinson

    John Hutchinson, Director, Setanta Performance International

  • Breeding mutual respect across and within channels
  • Valuing customer facing technology as virtual colleagues
  • Building frontline confidence and driving customer behaviour
  • Delivering a seamless service and demonstrating customer benefits
  • Reinforcing the message contact to contact, front and back of house
  • 9:40 UNIFYING DELIVERY CHANNELS

    John Sexton

    John Sexton, President & CEO, FPS Voyager.com

  • Integrating and unifying delivery channels
  • The challenges to efficient operation across all delivery channels
  • Redesigning the business processes and facilitating channel integration
  • Creating new efficiencies
  • Reducing overheads from the branch network
  • Providing faster access to funds
  • 10:20 AN ASSET OR A LIABILITY?

    John Spence

    John Spence, Director of Branch Network, Lloyds TSB Bank

  • A cost-benefit analysis of the high street branch
  • The costs of branch closures
  • To the consumer
  • To the bank
  • The costs of keeping a “redundant” branch
  • How the branch can be developed to play a more strategic role
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE CHANGING FUNCTION OF THE BRANCH

    Aidan Heslop

    Aidan Heslop, Assistant Director, Northern Rock

  • Becoming a more cost efficient outlet
  • Providing further services to customers
  • Using a high street presence to gain competitive advantage over stand alone banks
  • Integrating the branch with the increased distribution channels
  • Using the branch to demonstrate and support further functions of the bank
  • The future for the branch in the business strategy
  • 12:00 THE DEVELOPMENT OF BANK BRANCHES IN THE US

    Rob Markiewitz

    Rob Markiewitz, Senior Vice President, Channel Strategy & Development, Bank of America

  • Creating an infrastructure for continuous innovation
  • Transitioning from a “one size fits all model”
  • Testing revenue strategies such as the ability to capture investment assets
  • Integrating other channel and e-commerce strategies by building a “bricks and clicks” model
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 THE CHALLENGES FACING TODAY’S BRANCH

    Richard Sowerbutts

    Richard Sowerbutts, Partner-in-Charge of Financial Services Practice, Deloitte & Touche

  • The role of the branch in the bank’s distribution and overall strategy
  • Building the required infrastructure to allow successful strategy implementation
  • Ensuring the branch conforms to the bank’s strategy
  • Closing redundant branches or retaining them for customer contact?
  • The costs for customers and the bank if branches are closed
  • 14:40 TRANSFORMING THE BRANCH

    Peter Champion

    Peter Champion, Director, First Partnership Design Consultants

  • Is the branch an endangered species?
  • Assessing the role of the branch network in banking business strategy
  • Using physical spaces to out-perform other channel competitors
  • Ensuring the role of staff is optimised Using the branch to cross market the bank’s products
  • Building a template for all the branches
  • Evidence of success from previous redesigned branches
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 ACHIEVING THE SINGLE CUSTOMER VIEW IN THE BRANCH

    Stephen Overton

    Stephen Overton, CRM Director, Logica

  • The market place
  • The importance of the branch
  • Technology in the branch
  • Integrated teller/seller solutions
  • 16:20 SO WHAT'S REALLY IN IT FOR CUSTOMERS?

    Richard Lowrie

    Richard Lowrie, Global Thought Leadership Executive, IBM

  • What customers and prospects really value
  • What other stakeholders seek
  • Knowledge creation and management
  • Do we really mean "Branch Banking"?
  • 'Offline' and 'Online'
  • What the crystal ball is showing
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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