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Benefits of Attending
· Hear about the creation of the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) and what this means for the UK’s criminal justice system
· Assess the operational performance of PFI prisons in the UK
· Learn from different countries’ experiences through the international case studies regarding private finance and prisons
· Appreciate the legal and financial issues relating to using private finance in the criminal justice sector, especially topics such as risk and compensation, and contract design
· Realise the importance of design and the need to update facilities to cope with modern life and modern day crimes
· Understand the role of private finance in police, courts and youth justice and the future for these sectors
· Meet and network with leading industry players and raise the profile of your company

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
Robert Evans, Member of the European Parliament for London
Eithne Wallis, Director of NOMS Change Programme, National Offender Management Service, Home Office Paul Bowers, Director of Service Delivery, Youth Justice Board for England and Wales
Henri Vichard, Deputy Managing Director, Agence de Maîtrise d’Ouvage des Travaux du Ministère de la Justice (Building Agency of the Ministry of Justice)
József Radnay, Chancellor, Ministry of Justice, Hungary
Mzwandile Sokupa, Director - Facilities Planning & Development, Department of Correctional Services, Republic of South Africa
Stan Coats, Head of PPP Unit, Department for Constitutional Affairs
Councillor Stephen Murphy, Chairman, Greater Manchester Police Authority (GMPA)
Philip Airey, Audit Manager, National Audit Office
Paul Francis, Commercial Director, Securicor Justice Services
John Cann, Director - Police and Criminal Justice, Equion
Ben Rogers, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Public Policy Research (ippr)
Lesley Johnston, Resource Manager, and Ken Barr, Business Manager, Northern Ireland Court Service

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Philip Airey

Philip Airey, Audit Manager, National Audit Office

9:10 KEYNOTE SPEAKER: AN INTERNATIONAL MARKET UPDATE

Speaker to be confirmed

Speaker to be confirmed, ,

  • Over capacity in prisons – the common trend in Europe
  • Health issues and keeping up standards
  • PFI/PPP models in Europe – looking at the alternatives
  • The need for legislation alterations
  • The new and emerging trends – what is happening in the Prison Sector?
  • The economic rationale behind procuring through the PPP route
  • 9:40 NOMS – CREATING VISION INTO REALITY

    Eithne Wallis

    Eithne Wallis, Director of NOMS Change Programme, National Offender Management Service, Home Office

  • What is NOMS? - merging the Prison and Probation Services
  • How will NOMS affect the UK’s custodial service?
  • Moving central to regional – what are the challenges and obstacles to overcome?
  • How will NOMS be implemented?
  • Will the legislation need to change?
  • What changes should we expect to see?
  • 10:20 THE OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE OF PFI PRISONS

    Philip Airey

    Philip Airey, Audit Manager, National Audit Office

  • A pure form of PFI – design, construct, manage, finance – the contractor provides the whole service including custody, education and healthcare
  • Overview of report – the seven operational PFI prisons, our methods of assessment, conclusions
  • The treatment of prisoners - improved staff-prisoner relationships
  • The concerns regarding the lack of experienced staff – high staff turnover and security/safety issues
  • Inconsistencies between the targets set for PFI and public prisons, and issues regarding monitoring prison performance
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Robert Evans

    Robert Evans, a, Member of the European Parliament for London

    Mzwandile Sokupa

    Mzwandile Sokupa, Director - Facilities Planning & Development, Department of Correctional Services, Republic of South Africa

    Henri Vichard

    Henri Vichard, Deputy Managing Director, Agence de Maîtrise d’Ouvage des Travaux du Ministère de la Justice (Building Agency of the Ministry of Justice)

    Andrew Baker

    Andrew Baker, Associate Director, PFI Advisory Team, Mott MacDonald

    12:00 SOUTH AFRICAN PPPs IN PRISONS

    Mzwandile Sokupa

    Mzwandile Sokupa, Director - Facilities Planning & Development, Department of Correctional Services, Republic of South Africa

  • Procurement challenges faced by the South African prisons’ system
  • Background on the two PPP prisons – the two largest in the world
  • A comparison between PPP and conventional methods of procurement
  • Update on the two PPP prisons – renegotiating existing contracts
  • The future for PPPs in the Prison Sector – a comparative feasibility study to determine future procurement
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 PPPs IN THE FRENCH PRISON SERVICE

    Speaker to be confirmed

    Speaker to be confirmed, ,

  • Going down the PPP route for French prisons – the rationale behind the decision
  • Recent developments since the announcement of the planned projects
  • The French model for Public Private Partnerships
  • The new decree (3rd Article) - how will this shape the way for PPP opportunities in France?
  • The characteristics of a PPP – what are the challenges and obstacles facing the Ministry?
  • Financing and management – what role will the private sector play?
  • 14:40 OUTPUT SPECIFICATION AND RISKS

    Andrew Baker

    Andrew Baker, Associate Director, PFI Advisory Team, Mott MacDonald

  • Getting the contract right
  • Determining where risks lie
  • Risk assessment and allocation
  • Related issues of compensation and benefits
  • Sector differences
  • 15:20 LEGAL ISSUES RELATING TO THE USE OF PPP IN THE PRISON SERVICE

    Jancyn Gardiner

    Jancyn Gardiner, Partner, Norton Rose

  • The main legal challenges regarding PPPs in the Prison Service
  • Contract design and contracting procedures
  • The specialist advice and skills required by the legal team – project finance, construction and engineering, banking, property and environmental
  • The legal barriers to PPPs in prisons in many European countries
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    John Cousins

    John Cousins, Director, Management Consultancy, Mouchel Parkman

    9:10 YOUTH JUSTICE AND PPPs

    Paul Bowers

    Paul Bowers, Director of Service Delivery, Youth Justice Board for England and Wales

  • Overview of projects to date
  • Requirements of those in custody – due to age or need deemed as vulnerable and in need of care and attention
  • Importance of education centre – must provide formal education 25hrs per week, 52 weeks per year
  • Using PFI to provide more suitable establishments for these offenders
  • Future projects
  • 9:40 THE USE OF PPPs IN CUSTODIAL AND JUSTICE SERVICES

    Paul Francis

    Paul Francis, Commercial Director, Securicor Justice Services

  • Working in partnership with other agencies
  • Providing custody and rehabilitation for adults and young offenders
  • Lessons learnt from our role developing and managing the first PFI project – HM Prison and Young Offenders’ Institution Parc
  • Recognising the importance of education, work and innovation in rehabilitation – workshop, A-Levels, Offending Behaviour Programmes
  • Update on Oakhill Secure Training Centre – working directly with the Youth Justice Board
  • 10:20 THE UK POLICE PFI MARKET

    John Cann

    John Cann, Director - Police and Criminal Justice, Equion

  • Overview of market – signed deals current value of over £500 million, 17 of the 43 police forces across England and Wales have modernised their estates
  • New challenges - our changing modern world requires new police facilities and new skills
  • The importance of physical design and location
  • Vital skills for PFI providers involved in police projects – keeping to time and budget, flexibility, understanding operational needs
  • Importance of a genuine partnership – communication, adaptations, re-workings
  • Integrating the role of regeneration and consultation with local people
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 CASE STUDY – GREATER MANCHESTER POLICE STATIONS

    Councillor Stephen Murphy

    Councillor Stephen Murphy, Chairman, Greater Manchester Police Authority (GMPA)

  • Our strategy to improve facilities across the force
  • Manchester’s 17 new police facilities – update on our progress to date
  • The bidding process and selecting the consortium
  • Concentrating on design – a more ‘public friendly’ image
  • The importance of a close partnership between the consortium and the police - ‘User Group Meetings’
  • Our expectations for the future
  • 12:00 PANEL DISCUSSION

    John Cann

    John Cann, Director - Police and Criminal Justice, Equion

    Stan Coats

    Stan Coats, Head of PPP Unit, Department for Constitutional Affairs

    Paul Bowers

    Paul Bowers, Director of Service Delivery, Youth Justice Board for England and Wales

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 PPPs AND THE COURT SECTOR

    Stan Coats

    Stan Coats, Head of PPP Unit, Department for Constitutional Affairs

  • Using PPPs as a major element of our plans to improve court facilities and services
  • Overview of operational and signed projects, and projects in procurement
  • The need for new courts to meet modern operational needs and improve efficiency of our services
  • 14:20 CASE STUDY – HUMBERSIDE COURTS PPP PROJECT

    Eric Twigger

    Eric Twigger, Senior Consultant, Andrew Gibson Consulting (former Manager and PFI Sponsor for Humberside Magistrates' Courts Committee)

  • Overview of the £36 million project for three new build courts including accommodation and HQ
  • East Riding Council’s contract with Modern Courts Humberside – the consortium led by John Mowlem and Innisfree
  • How PFI has allowed us to work with the Private Sector to improve the facilities and the standards of service for all the people who use the courts
  • The range of the facilities provided
  • Design issues – constructing in accordance with the design principles set by the Lord Chancellor’s Department (now Department of Constitutional Affairs) Design Guide
  • Update – summary of the construction and operation of the courts to date and the future of Courts Contracts across both Crown, County Courts, Magistrates Courts and other tribunals
  • 15:00 PPPs AND THE COURT SECTOR CONTINUED

    Stan Coats

    Stan Coats, Head of PPP Unit, Department for Constitutional Affairs

  • Providing project management, funding, and technical support, and developing central PFI policy and best practice
  • Key issues – the service requirement, building design/quality, risk
  • Overview of progress to date and aims for the future
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CASE STUDY – BELFAST’S LAGANSIDE COURTS

  • The PFI project – our contact with Consul Services to design, build, finance, and operate a 16 court complex
  • From Brownfield site to award winning fully-operational courthouse
  • Benefits of having a multi-court complex in one location – flexibility, convenience, an increase in court sittings and a reduction in the backlogs of Crown Court business
  • The financial package
  • Two years in operation – the benefits and lessons learnt
  • Lesley Johnston

    Lesley Johnston, Resrouce Manager, Northern Ireland Court Service

    Ken Barr

    Ken Barr, Business Manager, Northern Ireland Court Service

    16:20 DESIGN ISSUES ACROSS THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SECTOR

    Ben Rogers

    Ben Rogers, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Public Policy Research (ippr)

  • The need for better policing and better police-public relations
  • The importance of design – shapes the way victims, witnesses, detainees, and the public relate to the police
  • Bringing together the public, designers, police and politicians and other stakeholders to stimulate discussion
  • Importance of design freedom to encourage change and innovation in design solutions
  • Operationally led design and the question of whole life costing
  • Our Criminal Justice Forum and our newly established working party on Citizenship and the Public Services
    Our findings and recommendations to date
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Financial Issues Relating to PPPs in the Criminal Justice Sector
    Workshop

    Financial Issues Relating to PPPs in the Criminal Justice Sector

    Park Street Training and Meeting Centre, at etc. venues
    22nd June 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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