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On the 1st of May 2004, 10 new countries have joined the EU, creating a single market of 25 EU member states. Following recent announcements to introduce PPP techniques as a way of increasing private sector involvement in the provision of public services in the new EU member states, secretariats and inter-ministry taskforces are being set up to co-ordinate these Government efforts.

This conference is going to include all the major accession countries and will cover the various sectors that are expected to start using these PPP structures, including the following countries and sectors:

  • Czech Republic
  • Poland
  • Hungary

  • Railroads
  • Roads
  • Public transport
  • Water
  • Social infrastructure ( Schools, Prisons)

    Speakers representing Government bodies include:
    Imre Rethy, Secretary of State, Ministry of Economy and Transport, Hungary
    Irena Herbst, Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Economy, Labour and Social Policy, Poland
    Jiri Paroubek, Deputy Mayor, Municipality of Prague
    Senior representative from the European Union, DG Regional Policy
    Dr Tom Mann, Deputy Director, Commercial Team, Department of Health
    Krzysztof Roman Siwek, Head of PPP Division, Department for Infrastructure Financing and European Funds, Ministry of Infrastructure, Poland
    Miklos Muranyi, Director, National Motorway
    Colonel Zoltan Cseri, Prison Service, Ministry of Justice, Hungary
    Mark Simpson, Senior Analyst, National Audit Office, UK
    Dr Istvan Fiala, Commissioner, Investments of Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Hungary

  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:10 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Campbell Steedman

    Campbell Steedman, Partner, Head of the Central European Group, Norton Rose

    9:20 KEYNOTE ADDRESS: THE HUNGARIAN GOVERNMENT’S ROLE IN PROMOTING PPP INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS

    Imre Rethy

    Imre Rethy, Secretary of State, Ministry of Economy and Transport, Hungary

  • The procedure of submitting proposals to the Government
  • The PPP interdepartmental committee
  • The motorway development plans up to 2015
  • The M5 and the M6 projects
  • Other ongoing projects
  • 9:40 THE ROLE OF THE NEW PROPOSED POLISH PPP LAW IN ESTABLISHING A PPP STRATEGY IN

    Irena Herbst

    Irena Herbst, Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Economy, Labour and Social Policy Poland

  • Main objectives of the PPP law - Removal of mental barriers - Removal of legal obstacles in other legislative acts - Basic regulation of the PPP agreements - Promotion of PPP
  • Main issues enclosed in the PPP law: Definition, PPP policy, Financial aspects, PPP centre
  • 10:10 NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR PRIVATE FINACE IN THE TRANSPORT SECTOR IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC

    Jiri Paroubek

    Jiri Paroubek, Deputy Mayor, Municipality of Prague

  • Construction of ring roads
  • Construction and extension of the underground, the underground lines, and the construction of a new tram line
  • The construction of the north-west part of the inner city ring road and tunnels
  • Introducing debt finance
  • Co-operation with the European Investment Bank
  • Looking for alternative financing of major transport projects

    Financing possibilities and co-operation with the private sector (PPP projects)

  • 10:40 Morning Coffee

    11:00 INTEGRATING EU GRANTS WITH PPP TO OPTIMISE VALUE FOR MONEY

    Marcel van denBroek

    Marcel van denBroek, Managing Partner, ECORYS Finance

  • The EU perspective on hybrid financing
  • The Polish perspective on hybrid financing
  • The private perspective on hybrid financing
  • The pitfalls of integrating EU grants with PPP in general
  • The pitfalls of integrating EU grants with PPP in Poland
  • The proposed solution
  • 11:30 THE ROLE OF THE CLINET IN A PPP PROJECT

    Dr. Alister W. Coutts

    Dr. Alister W. Coutts, Director of Property & Architectural Services, PPP Project, The Highland Council

  • Setting the strategic and operational context
  • Political and management structures to achieve corporate governance
  • Central and local Government requirements for PPP initiatives
  • Criteria for judging the project a success
  • Observations on the use of PPPs for local Government Projects
  • 11:30 THE ROLE OF THE CONSULTAND IN A PPP PROJECT

    Carolyn Low

    Carolyn Low, Manager, Deloitte MCS

  • Understanding the strategic and operational context
  • Knowledge transfer and the application of best practice
  • The consultant’s role at key stages of the procurement process
  • Building strong client/consultant relationship
  • Meeting client expectations in the future
  • 12:10 THE RISE AND RISE OF PFI IN WASTE

    Ronald Bates

    Ronald Bates, Head of Funding and Scrutiny, Waste Implementation Programme, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (DEFRA), UK

  • The impact of the Waste Implementation Programme and PFI
  • The basic model
  • Current constraints
  • Alternative models
  • (Last yet first) the need to be strategic
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    13:50 CASE STUDY: SOCIAL SERVICES PPP

  • The Greenwich Neighbourhood Resource Centres for Older People · Background to the project · What needs the project is satisfying · Why was a PPP approach adopted? · The relationship between the two public sector authorities - the National Health Service and the Local Authority
  • A banker's view of PPP projects in the social care sector · What makes a care PPP project bankable · Key challenges · How to mitigate the risks
  • Legal issues in social care projects · Outline contract structure · Risk allocation · Care in or out? · Joint procurement by two authorities
  • Jane Schofield

    Jane Schofield, Chief Executive, Greenwich Primary Care Trust (NHS)

    Christine Galeon

    Christine Galeon, Assistant Director, Dexia

    Christopher Causer

    Christopher Causer, Partner, Nicholson, Graham & Jones

    14:50 PPP IN HEALTHCARE – EXPERIENCES FROM THE UK

    Dr Tom Mann

    Dr Tom Mann, Deputy Director, Commercial Directorate, Department of Health

  • NHS needs assessment- International comparisons on elective surgery - national gaps - waiting lists
  • Political impetus for the new Government policy: PFI and PPP in the UK
  • The scope and progress of the ISTC programme
  • Implications: Clinical quality, measurements to the NHS
  • Hurdles to delivery of the schemes: - special interest groups - timelines - workforce issues (additionality, accreditation, work permits, redundancies) - local healthcare politics

    Outcomes: measurements and patient satisfaction

  • Future directions and implications

    Successes and lessons learnt

  • 15:30 Afternoon Tea

    15:50 GETTING THE MOST OUT OF HEALTHCARE PROJECTS

    Dr Adrian Bull

    Dr Adrian Bull, Managing Director, Carillion Health

  • Opportunities to improve the procurement process
  • Improving project efficiency
  • Knowledge management
  • Key issues for negotiation
  • Future development
  • Adapting the UK experience to other countries
  • 16:30 INSURANCE IN THE RISK MANANGEMENT PROCESS

    Mark Courtneidge

    Mark Courtneidge, Director, AON

  • How insurance fits into the risk management model
  • Overview of insurance coverages
  • Insurers on site – benefits and downsides
  • Rectification of the current insurance market imbalance
  • How can the new EU member states utilise insurance as part of their risk management strategy?
  • 17:10 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Campbell Steedman

    Campbell Steedman, Partner, Head of the Central European Group, Norton Rose

    9:10 NEW PPP DEVELOPMENTS IN THE UK MARKET, AND THEIR APPLICABILITY IN CEE MARKETS

    Charles Varga

    Charles Varga, Senior Partner, Charles Varga Law Firm, Budapest

    Chris Brown

    Chris Brown, PPP Partner, Norton Rose, London

    9:40 PPP’S - TRADITIONAL FINANCE - EU FUNDS

    Krzysztof Roman Siwek

    Krzysztof Roman Siwek, Head of PPP Division, Department for Infrastructure Financing and European Funds, Ministry of Infrastructure, Poland

  • Traditional thinking and mummified administration structures in defence of traditional financing models
  • Traditional behaviour is easier and safer
  • Demand for legal and structural support for PPP’s
  • Good experience ( pilot projects) are desired
  • The role of experience with EU funds

    Incentives for PPP development in the new accession countries

  • Looking for allies

    On the way to real PPP opportunities

    Conclusions – issues to be learn (roads, railways, municipal projects)

  • 10:10 THE ROAD TO SUCCESS - THE NEW M6 ROAD PROJECT

    Miklos Muranyi

    Miklos Muranyi, Director, National Motorway Rt, Hungary

  • The role of the National Motorway Rt.
  • New European priorities
  • Outline of the Hungarian PPP/PFI approach to risk allocation
  • Drivers for change since the first signed Hungarian BDFO road projects
  • Critical financing and practical issues

    What interests need to be aligned?

  • Commercial interest in the project so far and expected timeframes for tendering
  • 10:40 THE NEW M6 PROJECT

    Béla Kilyénfalvi

    Béla Kilyénfalvi, Director, ING Hungary

  • The aims of the payment mechanism
  • The components of the availability fee
  • Deductions for unavailability
  • Other deduction factors
  • The safety component and the traffic related component
  • Performance deductions
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:30 SUCESSFUL PROJECTS IN THE NORDIC COUNTRIES

    Gunnar Lundberg

    Gunnar Lundberg, Senior Vice President, Skanska BOT

    12:00 THE NEW PRISON PROJECTS IN HUNGARY – LEGAL, CONTRACTUAL AND SOCIAL ISSUES

    Brig. Gen. Dr László Huszár Ph.D

    Brig. Gen. Dr László Huszár Ph.D, Organisational Deputy of the General Director, Hungarian Prison Service

  • Setting up an inter-ministry taskforce to co-ordinate the government’s PPP efforts
  • Identifying and removing the legal obstacles that restrict the use of PPPs
  • Identifying the provision and operation of prisons as s suitable opportunity for using PPP techniques
  • Planning a privately financed and constructed 700 bed prison
  • Getting the Government’s Economic Committee to approve the plan
  • 12:30 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE OF PFI PRISONS

    Mark Simpson

    Mark Simpson, Senior Analyst, National Audit Office, UK

  • Introduction
  • PFI prisons against their contract
  • PFI prisons against comparators
  • Wider benefits of having PFI prisons in the public sector estate
  • Conclusion
  • 14:30 PPP INVESTMENTS IN HUNGARIAN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Dr Istvan Fiala

    Dr Istvan Fiala, Commissioner, Investments of Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Hungary

  • Background to the Hungarian Education system
  • Pathfinder status and progress
  • Key issues to be addressed
  • Challenges and obstacles encountered and outline of the possible solutions
  • 15:00 DEAL PROCESS: REACHING A BANKABLE DEAL IN THE ACCOMMODATION SECTOR

    Anthony Sykes

    Anthony Sykes, Deputy General Manager, Sumitomo Mitsui Bank SMBC

  • Opportunities for private sector involvement in the accommodation sector
  • Practical experiences from the UK (and Europe)- an insight into accommodation sector deals, including schools and Government buildings
  • Aligning interests between all parties
  • What makes accommodation deals attractive
  • The future for the sector
  • 15:30 Afternoon Tea

    15:50 BRIDGING THE GAP

    Tim Neal

    Tim Neal, Head of Public Private Finance Consulting, EC Harris

  • Transparency and bankability from a technical perspective
  • The “right” private sector response
  • Enabling bankable projects both for private and public sectors
  • 16:30 CENTRAL EUROPE’S INFRASTRUCTURE: ARE PPP’S THE ANSWER

    Andrew Bride

    Andrew Bride, Managing Director, Special Finance Unit, DepFa Bank

  • Key successes and failures
  • Conclusions drawn
  • Pointers for the future
  • 17:10 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Procurement and Associated Risks in PPPPFI Projects
    Workshop

    Procurement and Associated Risks in PPPPFI Projects

    Sofitel Atrium
    2nd July 2004
    Budapest, Hungary

    Sofitel Atrium

    H-1051 Budapest
    Roosevelt tér 2
    Budapest
    Hungary

    Sofitel Atrium

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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