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The pharmaceutical industry is undergoing a massive transformation, one in which computing and software companies are playing a major role in the acceleration of new products. Bioinformatics is becoming increasingly essential to all aspects of drug development from target discovery to target validation. The evolution to this new era of discovery has significant implications for all companies seeking better methods for aggregating, accessing, manipulating and analysing data with those pharmaceutical companies embracing informatics being propelled towards success. Bioinformatics now holds the key to separating the winners from the losers.

Bioinformatics in the 21st Century aims to explore the current key issues within the industry and the opportunities for the future of drug design. Topics covered at the conference will include data management and streamlining in a secure environment and the practical application of bioinformatics in drug design in areas such as genomics and proteomics. The future economic, regulatory and legal issues generated by the explosion of bioinformatics will also be covered. I

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Abdelazize Laoui

Dr Abdelazize Laoui, Head, Chemoinformatics, Aventis

9:10 BIOINFORMATICS IN THE PHARMA INDUSTRY: FROM PROMISE TO DELIVERY

Dr Carl Firth

Dr Carl Firth, Associate Director, Bioinformatics, AstraZeneca

  • Lessons learnt from the honeymoon
  • Critically assessing the value of bioinformatics
  • Balancing facilitation and exploitation
  • Evolving bioinformatics into a powerful research tool
  • Towards a biological data nexus
  • 9:40 INDUSTRY TRENDS

    Dr Dominic Clark

    Dr Dominic Clark, Consultant, Life Sciences, Scientific Generics

  • The bioinformatics market
  • Information and resources
  • Bioinformatics software sector
  • Database and services sectors
  • Bioinformatics ASPs, internet portals and information integration
  • Bioinformatics consulting services
  • 10:20 THE NEW AGE OF DIGITAL BIOLOGY

    Dr Seth Taylor

    Dr Seth Taylor, President, Molecularware

  • Automated workflows
  • Data management: workflows versus knowledge
  • Digital biology data explosion
  • Meta-data defines data quality
  • From data to biology
  • The impact on drug discovery
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 LIFE-SCIENCE INFORMATICS

    Andrew Payne

    Andrew Payne, Business Analyst, NetGenics

  • Tell me everything we need to know about…
    integrating data from disparate sources
  • What’s new
    alerting user(s) to updated information
  • Who would know about this:
    enabling collaboration
    eliminating duplication
  • I wonder if
    testing ideas with a novel ad-hoc query tool
  • What should I do next
    workflow and risk management in an integrated environment
  • 12:00 STATISITCAL ANALYSIS OF HIGH DENSITY AFFYMETRIX GENECHIP DATA AND BEYOND

    Dr Fiona Brew

    Dr Fiona Brew, Field Applications Support Manager, Affymetrix

  • Why Affymetrix derived a new method to analyse their data?
  • How did Affymetrix derive and test statistically based algorithm
  • The effect of the new algorithm on GeneChip probe array data
  • Successful methodologies to mine high density GeneChip probe array data
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 COMPUTATIONAL PRIORITIZATION

    Dr Nick Tisnoremas

    Dr Nick Tisnoremas, Vice President, Genomics, DoubleTwist

  • Using human genome sequences to generate a range of gene predictions sorted by type and depth of evidence
  • Multiple ab-intio gene finders and sequence-based association of experimental evidence optimising the ability to predict human genes
  • Case study- BLASTN/SIM4 mapping of clustered human and mouse expressed DNA sequences to the genome
  • Genome annotation using a rule-based system
  • Deriving estimates of sensitivity and specificity for different classes of gene predictions
  • Inclusion of multiple high sensitivity prediction methods is vital to direct future experimental investigation for possible novel genes
  • 14:20 THE GENELYNX SYSTEM

    Dr Wyeth Wasserman

    Dr Wyeth Wasserman, Group Leader, Gene Regulation Bioinformatics, Pharmacia / Karolinska Institute

  • Integrating human gene-specific information
  • Interface to public domain resources
  • Establishing hyperlinks to intranet resources
  • Example: Annotation of microarrays
  • Generation of gene summaries
  • 15:00 BIOINFORMATICS

    Victor Markowitz

    Victor Markowitz, Chief Information Officer & Senior Vice President, Data Management Systems, Gene Logic

  • Genomic data volume and heterogeneity
  • Modelling genomic data: characteristics
  • Data-acquisition vs data warehousing
  • Genomic data integration issues
  • Solutions and outlook
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 COMBINATORIAL AND INTEGRATIVE BIOINFORMATICS

    Matthias Fellenberg

    Matthias Fellenberg, Manager Bioinformatics Project, Biomax Informatics

  • Systematic genome analysis
  • Functional and structural classification
  • Functional analysis employing independent data types
  • Integration of heterogenous data sources
  • 16:40 BIOINFORMATICS- BRIDGING ISLANDS OF INFORMATION

    Dr David Fenyo

    Dr David Fenyo, , ProteoMetrics

  • Identifying core processes in target identification
  • The islands of information
  • Automated processes
  • Partnering for specialized analytics
  • Communication between partnered resources
  • Beyond automation

    Putting it all together

  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    9:10 BIOINFORMATICS IN THE DRUG DISCOVERY PROCESS

    Dr Vladimir Saudek

    Dr Vladimir Saudek, Senior Director, Bioinformatics, Incyte Genomics

  • From sequence to active molecules
  • Target selection and validation
  • What is a drugable target?
  • Hit generation and beyond
  • Case Study
  • 9:40 DRUG DISCOVERY THROUGH DIGITAL SYSTEMS BIOLOGY

    Dr Eric Neumann

    Dr Eric Neumann, Vice President, Bioinformatics, Beyond Genomics

  • Genomic information will have the most value when contexts of disease, tissue and genetics are included
  • Merging genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data in order to uncover mechanisms
  • Elucidating molecular pathways from multiple data sources
  • Extending proteomics to maximize value and significance
  • Moving from correlated facts to casual models of action
  • Using models to identify biomarkers and next generation targets
  • 10:20 MINING INTEGRATED DRUG AND TARGET DISCOVERY DATA

    Dr Luc Dehaspe

    Dr Luc Dehaspe, Chief Scientific Officer, PharmaDM

  • Introduction a role for data mining in science: the in silico research assistant
  • Data Preparation building integrated and mineable data representations: the importance of multi-relational databases
  • Data Mining
    - exploring an integrated database of biological, chemical and clinical data
    - approaching the data from multiple angles (bio,chemo,clinical)
    - scanning the best-of-breed data mining technologies for an optimal solution
    - using relational data mining to discover patterns in multi-relational data
  • Sample bioinformatics applications
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 CHEMOINFORMATICS LOOKS TO BIO

    Dr Abdelazize Laoui

    Dr Abdelazize Laoui, Head, Chemoinformatics, Aventis

  • Developing new drug discovery informatics solutions; designed to deal with the challenges in today’s data-rich environment
  • Challenges arising from the volume, diversity and variable quality of data being generated
  • Data pipelining has emerged as a practical technology for accelerating the discovery process
  • Bridging the gap between bioinformatics and chemoinformatics quickly
  • Implementing a new paradigm in drug discovery: Chemical Biology
  • Case Study: Examples of application to the identification of Farnesyl transferase inhibitors and G-quadruplex DNA ligands
  • 12:00 BIOINFORMATIC SYSTEMS

    Dr Jonathan Sheldom

    Dr Jonathan Sheldom, Head of Bioinformatics, Oxford Glycosciences

  • Proteomics is the drug discovery and development technology of choice for the 21st century
  • High throughput proteomics is highly automated
  • Data is automatically acquired form mass spectrometers and other instruments
  • Proteomics data is combined with protein sequences. DNA sequences and other genome related data to create complex databases
  • Value is obtained from these databases using bioinformatic and data mining tools
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 LEVERAGING BIOINFORMATICS FOR DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Anthony Kerlavage

    Dr Anthony Kerlavage, Senior Director, Product Strategy, Celera Genomics

  • Value of an accurately assembled and annotated genome
  • The power of comparative genomics
  • Understanding gene regulation
  • The effects of human variation on drug development
  • Linking genomics and proteomics
  • How bioinformatics can support target validation
  • 14:20 INFORMATICS- DRIVEN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Malcolm Weir

    Dr Malcolm Weir, Chief Executive Officer, Inpharmatica

  • Discovery of drugs against novel targets derived from genomic information is a highly inefficient and attritional process
  • The pivitol step is selecting the most drugable and biologically valid targets from the genome
  • A unifying informatics framework that reconciles biological and chemical information
  • Protein and small-molecule structure provides the foundation for this framework
  • Informatics must be applied on a genomic scale for target selection and subsequent drug discovery steps to be truly rational
  • Heavy investment in infrastructure and automated, robust, scaleable systems based on powerful algorithms and engineering

    The practice of drug discovery needs to be based on informatics and information generation which is transformed to ‘gene-to-drug pipeline’ thinking

  • 15:00 BIOINFORMATICS IN RESEARCH

    Steve Lincoln

    Steve Lincoln, Chief Scientific Officer & Senior Vice President, Product Development, InforMax

  • Bioinformatics: The scientific challenge
  • The emerging market for bioinformatics
  • The evolution of bioinformatics: post-genome informatics
  • High-throughput research: data integration, genomic integration, and laboratory productivity
  • The discovery R & D value chain
  • Applied bioinformatics: A practical example

    The impact of bioinformatics on the pharmaceutical and biotech industries

  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

    Trevor Cook

    Trevor Cook, Partner, Bird and Bird

  • Types of protection- patents, database rights or confidential information?
  • When and what to patent- tools themselves or the results of their use?
  • Current issues in gene patenting
  • Current issues in bioinformatics patenting
  • 16:40 REGULATORY ISSUES

    Simon Harper

    Simon Harper, Senior Associate, Lovells

  • Regulating the new genetic era
  • Licensing procedures
  • Potential value of licences on product life-cycle protection
  • The future regulatory environment
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Workflow data management in the new age of digital biology
    Workshop

    Workflow data management in the new age of digital biology

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    18th January 2002
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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