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There has been a significant drive by the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries to find and develop compounds that will become tomorrow’s outstanding new drugs. This has led to a proliferation in new technologies, new strategies and new ways of thinking for the industries. With the rapidly expanding proteomics sector playing a key role in the acceleration of new products in the new era of drug discovery, the potential applications of proteomics are enormous, offering the key to the future success of next generation drugs.

SMi’s “Proteomics” conference will explore the latest proteomics-based approaches to drug discovery and development, providing you with the latest information within this exciting field. The conference will address the key issues, including the development of novel technologies, integration of proteomics into the drug development process, and strategic applications of proteomics to ensure product success. Commercial issues such as regulatory, intellectual property and partnering issues will also be discussed. This top-level forum brings together experts in the field of proteomics to offer a valuable insight into the promising potential of proteomics within the future of the drug industry.

Benefits of attending:

· Keep up to date with industry developments in this vital area

· Explore the latest developments and innovations in proteomics

· Learn about the latest strategy techniques to increase both your efficiency and productivity

· Meet the key players: Bristol-Myers Squibb, Oxford Glycosciences, Eli Lilly, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, The Human Proteome Organisation.

What’s more there will be plenty of opportunities to network with leaders in the fields of proteomics, drug discovery and emerging technologies.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Mike Kelly

Dr Mike Kelly, Manager, Pharmacoproteomics & BioSourcing, Oxford GlycoSciences

9:10 IMPORTANCE OF PROTEOMICS

Dr Alfred Gaertner

Dr Alfred Gaertner, Head, Proteomics, Genencor International

  • Deciphering the “omes” – protein science versus proteomics
  • Opportunities in the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of disease
  • The challenges of clinical research using proteomics
  • Linking the transcriptome with the proteome
  • Fishing for function – high throughput methods for upstream separation
  • Correlating protein structure and function
  • 9:40 THE POWER OF TARGETED ONCOLOGY

    Dr Larry Witte

    Dr Larry Witte, Vice President, Research, ImClone Systems

  • C225? An example of targeted oncology at work
  • Recognising a potential oncology target
  • Qualifications of a clinically relevant target
  • Therapeutic applications
  • Proteomics and the production of thousands of drug targets.
  • 10:20 PROTEOMICS IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Kevin Pritchard

    Dr Kevin Pritchard, Director, Protein Science, AstraZeneca

  • Using the genome in proteomics
  • Building on the Human Genome Project
  • Protein expression profiling
  • Functional proteomics
  • Proteomics adding value to the pharmaceutical pipeline
  • The technology marketplace: proteomics and genomics tools
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PROTEOMICS-BASED DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    Prof. Ian Humphery-Smith, Chief Scientific Officer, Glaucus Proteomics

    Prof. Ian Humphery-Smith, Chief Scientific Officer, Glaucus Proteomics, , Researcher, University of Utrecht, and Co-founder, Human Proteome Organisation

  • Trends in proteomic drug discovery
  • Target identification, selection and validation
  • Development of practical high-throughput protein purification and analysis methods
  • Insights into 3-D sequence, sequence-structure and structure-function relationships
  • Intelligent information management of pathway-based drug discovery and design
  • Development of protein chips and array displays of designed synthetic peptides
  • 12:00 INDUSTRIAL-SCALE PROTEOMICS

    Prof Keith Rose

    Prof Keith Rose, Chief Scientific Officer, GeneProt

  • GeneProt Inc.
  • Protein separation overview
  • Large and small proteins
  • Mass spectrometry: MALDI and electrospray
  • Bioinformatics
  • Protein synthesis
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 METHODOLOGY

    Dr David Edwards

    Dr David Edwards, President and Chief Executive Officer, Hybrigen

  • Proteomic technologies that will play an important role in drug discovery
  • Technology to effectively study proteins within cells
  • Protein-based technologies for target validation
  • Tools and data to improve and accelerate protein selection and pathway modelling
  • Bioinformatics technology to cross-reference protein informatics with genomic databases
  • Successful partnership strategies
  • 14:20 MINING PROTEOMICS (IMAGE, NUMERIC AND TEXTUAL) DATA

    Dr Suzanne Mattingly

    Dr Suzanne Mattingly, Vice President, Scimagix

  • High throughput proteomics requires new, more accurate 2D gel analyses
  • Mining of 2D gel analysis data using an Oracle database provides scalability, extensibility and speed of retrieval to review data
  • Proven image data mining approach provides pharmaceutical researchers with insights and a better understanding of mechanism of action
  • Latest developments in data visualization assist researchers to find, validate and use/reuse protein expression data in pharmaceutical R & D
  • Integration of proteomics data provides a comprehensive knowledge base
  • Linking proteomics data with other image and non-image data impacts decision-making in discovery research
  • 15:00 IN SILICO PROTEOMICS

    Dr Gareth Roberts

    Dr Gareth Roberts, Chief Executive Officer, Proteom

  • Data on protein sequence, structure and functionality is becoming a commodity

    Processing data to yield biological tools and ligands is a critical choke point in drug discovery

  • Smart informatics and data mining are revealing patterns in the way proteins interact with each other
  • A knowledge of validated patterns or rules provides a powerful predictive in silico paradigm
  • Using this paradigm it is possible to design specific ligands, identify binding regions on proteins and predict protein partners
  • This new knowledge opens up the frontier to in silico drug discovery

    Initial exploration and design takes place in silico, the results of this work are then validated in specific, focussed biological experiments

  • In silico approaches can supplant the ‘high throughput, random screening, combinatorial library’ paradigms

    In silico proteomics offers a fast, directed and intelligent way from a linear protein sequence into a drug discovery programme.

  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Stefan Henning

    Dr Stefan Henning, Director, Functional Biology, Xerion Pharmaceuticals

  • The “Loss of Function” concept in functional proteomics
  • Drug target validation
  • Chromophore-assisted Laser Inactivation (CALI)
  • From CALI to XCalibur™
  • Identification of disease relevant proteins
  • 16:30 HIGH-THROUGHPUT PROTEOMICS

    Dr Bob Marchmont

    Dr Bob Marchmont, Business Development Director, Nonlinear Dynamics

  • Generating high-throughput proteomics data
  • Managing and tracking the explosion in proteomics data
  • Maintaining high performance data mining and interrogation
  • Integration with diverse, complimentary biodata
  • Scaling bioinformatics solutions for the future
  • 17:00 PRIORITISING THE PROTEOME

    Dr John Overington

    Dr John Overington, Vice President, Drug Discovery, Inpharmatica Ltd

  • An integrated informatics approach to drug discovery
  • Applying structural bioinformatics to functional annotation
  • Scope of the druggable genome
  • Chemoinformatics approach to defining druggable targets
  • 17:30 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Prof. Ian Humphery-Smith, Chief Scientific Officer, Glaucus Proteomics

    Prof. Ian Humphery-Smith, Chief Scientific Officer, Glaucus Proteomics, and, Researcher, University of Utrecht, Co-founder, Human Proteome Organisation

    9:10 POST-GENOMICS AREA: FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS & PROTEOMICS

    Dr Dirk Pollet

    Dr Dirk Pollet, Vice President, Business Development, Galapagos Genomics

  • Selection of disease relevant proteins
  • Adenoviral expression (PhenoSelect™) libraries in combination with cell-based screens for target identification
  • Established libraries in arrayed (‘one protein one well’) and miniaturised (384 well) format
  • High-throughput automation platform for library construction and screening
  • Galapagos Custom Adenovirus Production™ services for target validation
  • 9:40 THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

    Dr Stanley Hefta

    Dr Stanley Hefta, Director, Proteomics, Bristol-Myers Squibb

  • Integration of genomics and proteomics technologies
  • Protein profiling and analysis of post-translation modification
  • Identifying specific proteins for therapeutics
  • Increasing the speed and efficiency of clinical trials
  • 10:20 INTEGRATION OF PROTEOMICS AND PREDICTIVE TOXICOLOGY

    Dr Sandy Kennedy

    Dr Sandy Kennedy, Director, Non-Clinical Development, Oxford Glycosciences

  • Application of toxicology information
  • Utilising proteomics in toxicology problem solving
  • Current challenges
  • Proteomic biomarkers
  • Screening for early selection
  • Solving toxicity issues
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 RISKS AND BENEFITS

    Dr A Bout

    Dr A Bout, Executive Director, Protein Production, Crucell

  • Introduction to mAbstract technology
  • Identification of proteins with tumor specific glycosylation
  • Disease-associated confirmational alterations of proteins
  • Therapeutic applications
  • 12:00 QUALITY CONTROL OF PROTEINS

    Dr Alex Drake

    Dr Alex Drake, Senior Lecturer, Department of Pharmacy, Kings College London

  • Identity: amino acid content, sequence, -S-S- linkage, molecular shape
  • Chemical purity: external and internal
  • Physical properties: solubility, freeze-drying, self-association and metal ions
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 HIGH-RESOLUTION PROTEOMICS

    Dr S Arnaud

    Dr S Arnaud, Scientific Support, Hybrigenics

  • Therapeutic intervention in drug developments
  • Developments with protein interaction and mass spectometry
  • Analysis of human samples on the proteome level
  • Purification of recombinant proteins
  • Future target and drug validation in human diseases
  • 14:10 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ISSUES V PROTEOMICS

    Sarah Turner

    Sarah Turner, Solicitor, Lovells

  • Current issues in proteomic patenting
  • Insights into unknown terrain
  • How will protein structures and functions be treated?
  • 14:50 CORPORATE STRATEGY AND ALLIANCES

    Dr Charles Fowler

    Dr Charles Fowler, Business Alliance Manager, Eli Lilly

  • Developing strategic vision
  • Linking alliances to corporate strategy
  • Considerations for a successful alliance
  • Assessing and developing winning relationships
  • Identifying key partners
  • Implementation and management
  • 15:30 Afternoon Tea

    15:50 COMMERCIALISATION AND MARKETING

    Dr David Huckle

    Dr David Huckle, Chief Executive, Adams Business Associates

  • Increasing market growth
  • Developing and marketing novel proteomic diagnostic kits and reagents
  • Therapeutic intervention earlier, with correct selection
  • Novel routes for commercialisation
  • Altering marketing strategies for Pharma & Life Science companies
  • 16:30 GETTING A PRODUCT TO MARKET

    Prof. Rolf Werner

    Prof. Rolf Werner, Corporate Director Biopharmaceuticals, Boehringer Ingelheim

  • Achieving breakthrough
  • Obtaining regulatory approval
  • Pricing and reimbursement
  • Developing a market strategy
  • Competing with other products
  • Developing relationships with key organisations, professionals and the public
  • 17:10 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Developing an Optimal Methodology for Valuing Emerging Technologies
    Workshop

    Developing an Optimal Methodology for Valuing Emerging Technologies

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    30th January 2002
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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