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There is still a real need for increased productivity in the pharmaceutical industry. The cost of developing an innovative drug is becoming higher, so the importance of reducing the attrition rate of drugs in development is ever increasing. It is the aim of this conference to offer high quality guidance to ways of reducing the attrition rate and therefore reducing the failure of so many drugs in the clinical stages of development. Of every 5000 compounds, only 250 enter preclinical trials and only 1 in 10 of these drugs are approved: statistics, which need to be improved. The low percentage of drugs making it through the process and reaching registration has scoped to improve as a result of new technology in drug discovery.

There is a great need to improve the selection process of drugs in the late stages of discovery to limit the numbers of costly failures. The current approaches include the use of rapid parallel synthesis and combinatorial chemistry, robotic screening, intelligent library design, involving an understanding of the properties of drugs and the ability to predict activity. The conference will look at how these methods might be improved, together with developments in screening methods and target selection. Reducing the attrition rate of drug discovery is increasingly dependent upon knowledge of Informatics, Drug modelling, in silico etc. and improvements in these technologies will also be assessed.

5 Key benefits of attending

1. Keep up with the latest developments
2. Learn from leading experts
3. Understand the key methods for reducing the attrition rate in drug discovery
4. Compare strategies of leading companies
5. Take advantage of networking opportunities

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Dale Johnson

Dr Dale Johnson, Vice President, Pre-clinical & Predictive Development, Eos Biotechnology

9:10 DIRECTIONS FOR RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Dr Cyndy Lumley

Dr Cyndy Lumley, Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs, CMR International

  • Where are the pressures on discovery coming from? Key development drivers (output, time, attrition)
  • Attrition in context: measuring productivity in discovery
  • Measuring attrition: pitfalls and caveats
  • Reducing attrition in discovery: can it be achieved and what will be the impact?
  • Key determinants of future success
  • 9:40 IMPROVING LEAD DISCOVERY PROCESS

    Dr Kurt Stoeckli

    Dr Kurt Stoeckli, Vice President, Global Head, Lead Discovery Technologies, Aventis

  • Latest developments in lead discovery technologies
  • Strategic shift towards quality
  • Complementary approaches (diversity vs focused screening)
  • Importance of alignment with up and downstream interfaces to HTS
  • Productivity increase in lead discovery
  • Determining which lead discovery approach is appropriate for your projects
  • 10:20 FINDING LEADS MORE EFFICIENTLY

    Dr John Harris

    Dr John Harris, Technical Director, BioFocus

  • Do we have enough hits? Too many?
  • Do we have enough drug leads? If not, why not?
  • Designing and screening focused libraries
  • High-quality leads for kinases and GPCRs
  • Examples of the benefits of the focused approach
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 DRUG DISCOVERY: THE CHANGING ROLE OF RESEARCH INFORMATICS

    Dr David Wadsworth

    Dr David Wadsworth, Head, Research Information Management & Technology, F. Hoffmann – La Roche

  • Pre-history
  • Classical Discovery Informatics
  • The Genomic Age
  • The Post-Genomic Age
  • Consistent Constants
  • 12:00 STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING THE ATTRITION RATE IN RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

    Dr John Mills

    Dr John Mills, Director, Biology, Amedis Pharmaceuticals

  • Problem analysis – Amedis solution
  • Application of in silico, AL technology
  • Early ADME prediction affords a “fail fast” approach
  • Therapeutic switching – a fast route to the clinic?
  • Enhanced analogues – application of chemistry technology
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 PARALLEL OPTIMISATION

    Dr Anthony Baxter

    Dr Anthony Baxter, Chief Executive Officer, Argenta Discovery

  • The need to increase the rate of attrition in research to decrease it in development
  • How parallel optimisation is the way to do this
  • In silico prediction of eADMET for parallel optimisation
  • In vitro prediction of eADMET for parallel optimisation
  • 14:40 AUTOMATION OF THE DISCOVERY PROCESS

    Dr Andreas Sewing

    Dr Andreas Sewing, Head, Automated Screening Technologies, Pfizer

  • Automation in drug discovery – past and present
  • The need for improvement and development of the discovery process
  • Industrialisation of R&D
  • Does technology deliver high quality candidates?
  • 15:20 SCREENING METHODS FOR SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES

    Dr Alastair Riddell

    Dr Alastair Riddell, Chief Executive Officer, Pharmagene

  • Pre-clinical in vitro human testing
  • Integrating gene expression, protein localisation and function
  • Patterns of target expression throughout the body revealing pathways, clusters and “orphan” roles
  • Cell based assays using primary human liver cells
  • The metabolic and toxicological profiles of the glitazones
  • Examples of how the above strategy has produced new leads and drugs for IBS, migraine and cystic fibrosis
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    Followed by Afternoon Tea

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Hartmut Voss

    Dr Hartmut Voss, Vice President, Scientific Content Management, Lion Bioscience

    9:10 TURNING QUANTITY INTO QUALITY

    Dr Jochen Konig

    Dr Jochen Konig, Business Development Management, Genedata

  • High throughput data generation for drug discovery
  • How do genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome contribute to a common picture?
  • Have the “-omics” failed to deliver on their promise?
  • What you put in is what you get out – assuring data quality
  • Establishing specialised workflows for data analysis
  • Enabling automation of genomics R&D
  • 9:40 ORGANOTYPIC TISSUE CULTURE SYSTEMS FOR LEAD SELECTION AND OPTIMISATION

    Dr Lars Sundstrom

    Dr Lars Sundstrom, Chief Scientific Officer, Capsant Neurotechnologies

  • Models of excitotoxicity and ischaemia
  • Organotypic tissue culture systems
  • Lead Identification and optimisation
  • Prospects for target discovery and validation
  • 10:20 PREDICTIVE TOXICOLOGY

    Dr Albert Li

    Dr Albert Li, President & Chief Executive Officer, Phase-1 Molecular Toxicology

  • Needs of early clinical drug development
  • Advantages in gene expression technologies and bioinformatics to help reveal mechanisms of toxicity
  • How to make quicker and more effective decisions regarding toxic responses to the drug
  • HTS techniques for identification of hypersensitivity to particular drugs
  • Development of predictive biomarkers for drug toxicity
  • Establishing best practice for toxicity testing
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ROLE OF IN SILICO ADME AND TOXICITY PREDICTION IN IMPROVING SUCCESS RATE

    Dr Alan Wilson

    Dr Alan Wilson, Senior Director & Senior Fellow, Pharmacia

  • Current status of in silico modeling for prediction of biopharmaceutical properties, ADME and toxicity
  • Strategies for the development and implementation of in silico models
  • Approaches to integrating predictive modeling into high throughput screening and drug discovery
  • Future opportunities and challenges of in silico modeling
  • 12:00 DATA INTEGRATION AND DECISION SUPPORT IN THE DRUG DISCOVERY PROCESS

    Dr Hartmut Voss

    Dr Hartmut Voss, Vice President, Scientific Content Management, Lion Bioscience

  • Past usage of data handling in drug discovery
  • The need for improvement and development of the discovery process
  • Integration of in silico and wet lab / HTS activities
  • Linking the target validation and the lead identification/optimisation process
  • Decision support: fail early, fail cheap
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 NEW APPROACHES TO PREDICTIVE TOXICOLOGY

    Dr Dale Johnson

    Dr Dale Johnson, Vice President, Pre-clinical & Predictive Development, Eos Biotechnology

  • Genome-wide biomarker discovery for human toxicity
  • Quality control of genomic platforms
  • Tissue specific gene expression
  • Integrated gene expression analysis
  • Application to high throughput screening
  • 14:40 ACCESS TO PATIENTS

    Dr Tom Ruane

    Dr Tom Ruane, Director, Investigator Services, Quintiles

  • Appreciating the ‘evolved’ clinical patient
  • The clinical trial process – get it right first time
  • From “feasibility” to Patient Referral Mapping
  • Ensuring success by not only recruiting but also retaining patients
  • The value proposition and return on investment
  • Current understanding and future strategies
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE DECISION MAKING PROCESS IN DRUG DISCOVERY

    Dr Alejandro Aruffo

    Dr Alejandro Aruffo, President, Abbott Bioresearch Center

  • Current situation: unacceptably high attrition rate
  • Improving the process
  • Differences between attrition rates for biologic vs un-biologic drug candidates
  • Where do we go from here?
  • 16:20 ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH DRUG DISCOVERY

    Mark Shillito

    Mark Shillito, Partner, Intellectual Property & Life Sciences Group, Herbert Smith

  • Justification of spending in genomics and drug discovery
  • Practical protection for your investment
  • Funding issues related to intellectual property
  • Morality and social efficiency of allowing companies exclusive rights
  • Use of information from third party databases as part of the discovery process
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Drug Discovery Technology
    Workshop

    Drug Discovery Technology

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    22nd January 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

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    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

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    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

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